12 Records out of 22207 Records

Health information systems reform in Kenya : an institutionalist perspective

Author: Bernardi, Roberta

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Information and Communication Technology ; Health ; Health information ; Donors ;

Abstract:

The development outcome of ICT and information systems in developing countries is often influenced by international development policies and the action of international actors such as donor agencies. In particular, ICT adoptions and implementations in developing countries may be influenced by the contradictions arising mainly from the tension between international managerialist development policies and the main rationalities of actors in the local implementation context. Based on the case study of health information systems in Kenya, the objective of this thesis is to increase the understanding of how these contradictions may affect the development and change potential of health information systems and ICTs in developing countries in relation to international development policies. Drawing on a dialectical perspective on institutional work, the thesis argues that the change and development trajectories arising from the implementation and usage of health information systems depend on how actors involved in the restructuring of health information systems i.e. donor partners, national decision makers and local health information systems managers and users respond to the ongoing dialectic between global and local pressures of institutional change and stability. The main findings of the research presented in this thesis point to the importance of analysing political donor relations and the institutional entrepreneurship of local actors in order to understand the change and development outcomes of health information systems and ICT in developing countries.

Private equity in Kenya : an analysis of emerging legal and institutional issues

Author: Tuimising, Nathan R

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Equity/Equity financing/Equity capital/Capital markets/Finance/Investments/ ;

Abstract:

In Kenya, like in many other countries around the world, private equity?s emergence as a creative method for financing companies, is attracting attention as the government seeks new ways of financing its private sector which it now recognises as the engine for Kenya?s economic development. This policy outlook is undermined by the reality of a yet extensively under-capitalised private sector, and the lack of a coherent body of knowledge and experience on Kenyan private equity. This study, for the first time, brings together that dispersed body of knowledge to facilitate coherent analysis of the emerging legal and institutional issues that private equity introduces. Using case law and statutory analysis, documentary reviews, interviews and surveys to construct the complete picture of Kenyan private equity, this empirical legal inquiry finds that the law on private equity in Kenya is incomplete: it is patchy and dispersed, and is not uniformly applied among and across all private equity market intermediaries. Secondly, the institutions charged with supervising the implementation of the law are under-capacitated, with the result that regulatory supervision within the private equity industry remains weak and largely unfelt. Thirdly, the legal institutions supporting private equity practice in Kenya (security of property rights, security of financial contracts and integrity in financial reporting) are in a nascent state of development. Fourthly, there is no clear policy on alternative investments generally, and private equity particularly, in Kenya, undermining precision in regulatory objectives. These realities combine to blunt the impact of private equity in driving creative entrepreneurship. These realities support the need for structured national capacity enhancement across all spheres of private equity practice, such as would strengthen regulatory supervision, the emergence of a ?home brand? to private equity, the increased visibility of structured government engagement in channelling private equity into economically productive sectors linked to the nation?s development strategy. These findings mirror earlier research investigating the under-performance of private equity in emerging markets, with the upshot that a law and institutional growth model for private equity in Kenya is the necessary catalyst that will trigger the rapid expansion of the Kenyan private equity industry in aid of national development.

Biography of an English language textbook in Kenya : a journey from conceptualization to the classroom

Author: Kiai, Alice Wanjira

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: English language/English teaching/Textbooks/English as a second language/ ;

Abstract:

This biography tells the life story of a secondary school English coursebook in Kenya following market liberalization (1998) and curriculum review (2002). In ELT, Gray (2007, 2010) first applied the ?circuit of culture? model to global English coursebooks; in contrast, I examine the case of a single local publication. The textbook has been described as a politico-economic, socio-cultural, and curriculum product. I focus on it primarily as a curriculum product and delink the circuit of culture from its original application in textbook studies in the service of a sociocultural perspective. I posit that the model has the explanatory power to capture the various research focuses that textbook studies may take. The circuit of culture has five processes or ?moments?: representation, identity, regulation, production and consumption. Following preliminary work, my ?journey? begins in the representation moment, using Littlejohn?s (1992, 1998) framework for materials analysis. In the regulation moment, I interview three participants linked to the curriculum development body (KIE). In the production moment, I interview four authors, the editor and the publishing manager of the selected coursebook. In the consumption moment, I interview sixteen teachers who are or have been users of the materials. Four of the teachers participate in classroom observation and their learners respond to a questionnaire. Finally, I build a key identity statement about the coursebook, pooled from the findings in each moment. I reposition the identity moment and posit its centrality at the core of the circuit. Spurred by insights on innovation in English language education, I support the strengthening of ?feedback loops? across moments, and the recognition of the consumption moment as the zone for promoting dynamism and synergy in textbook development. This can (ideally) result in curriculum products and practices capable of overcoming challenges of interpretation and transition, while promoting good practices across moments.

The localization of international refugee law : implications of law, policy and practice of refugee admission and protection in Kenya

Author: Aukot, Ekuru

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2004

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Refugees ; Legislation ; International law ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Managing without institutions : the role of communication networks in governing resource access and control. [Kenya].

Author: King, A

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: Index To Theses ;

Subject Terms: Economics/Communications networks/Resource allocation/Management/ ;

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the way groups or individuals tackle resource access and control problems does not always reflect identifiable institutional processes. This was tested through a case study of livelihoods and resource access problems of a Kenyan coastal community dependent on small scale fisheries. The structure of the study was based on the need to understand the context in which people live in order to interpret their behaviour. Each chapter sought to examine aspects of people's social and biophysical setting, paying particular attention to changes and causes of change. This involved a reconstruction of the community's historical relations with other groups in their area; socio-economic analysis of the livelihoods of different groups within the community; and social network analysis of people's actions in response to resource access and control problems. All groups within the community depended on a range of activities to provide food and income, but the role of fishing was dominant. Changes in local natural environments were shown to have led to a decrease in household productivity over the last five decades. This was attributed to colonialism, international development and cultural changes. This also led to increased effort in the sea, leading to overfishing. The overall socio-economic situation of the community was revealed as poor. Social network analysis showed that administrative and political actors were found to be more important than actors with a legal mandate to solve resource related problems. It was shown that formal institutions relating to natural resources stifled the process of problem resolution. Local people were found to use alternative processes, based on communication networks, to solve problems, thus supporting the hypothesis. The findings stress the importance of understanding local people's socio-economic and socio-political situation before developing resource management strategies. Resource managers could make use of social network analysis to identify and understand the roles of key people, groups and organisations

A food security approach to marine protected area impacts on surrounding fishing communities : the case of Kisite Marine National Park in Kenya.

Author: Malleret-King, Delphine

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Economics ; Food security ; Kisite-Mpunguti Marine National Park ; Fishing industry ; Marine parks and reserves ;

Abstract:

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been suggested as one of the solutions to coral reef fisheries management. It is thought that their effects on biomass, species diversity and habitat could improve surrounding fisheries yields through fish migration and increased recruitment. However, MPAs' benefits on surrounding fisheries are difficult to establish due to the lack of historical data. Furthermore, the lack of involvement of stakeholders have led to a number of failures. MPAs in the form of No Take Zones (NTZ), which aim to promote the sustainable use of fisheries resources, might contribute to the successful management of coral reef fisheries. However, few studies have considered their benefits from the point of view of surrounding fishing communities. It is evident that if stakeholders are to be further involved in MPA management, they need to perceive the benefits. The hypothesis tested was that if NTZs are of benefit to surrounding communities, their food security situation would be improved. The fieldwork was carried out in Southern Kenya with five fishing communities located around a long established MPA. The study showed that a range of food security indicators gave good information on MPAs' benefits to the surrounding communities. It was found that these benefits were highly affected by distances. Thus, although fishing households were the least food secure, they were better off if they fished nearer the protected reefs. Households dependent on MPA-related tourism were the most food secure but this dependency decreased with the communities' distance from the main tour operators. The results showed that MPAs' benefits were not equally shared by the communities bearing most of the costs. In addition, it was also found that tourism seasonality does not always compensate for the seasonality of other activities. Furthermore, tourism could not be assumed to develop around MPAs and provide reliable alternative employment

Reproducers reproduced : social-legal regulation of sexuality and fertility among adolescent girls in Kenya

Author: Kabeberi-Macharia, J W

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Girls/Teenagers/Sexual behavior/Fertility/Legislation/ ;

Abstract:

This study analyses socio-legal issues pertaining to sexuality and reproduction within the context of the realities and lives of Kenyan women and in particular, Kenyan adolescent girls. The study explores the regulatory mechanisms relating to adolescent sexuality and fertility, and examines how these have been historically constructed both to limit and to open up the knowledge and choices of adolescent girls regarding their sexuality and reproduction. It examines the historical nature of the actors and the regulatory mechanisms (within the specific contexts), how these define the status of women within their families and communities, and their ability to regulate their sexuality and fertility. It unearths the intricate nature of the inter-relationship between the actors and regulatory mechanisms, and develops a framework of analysis for this task. The study argues that regulation of adolescent sexuality and fertility is complex and multi-dimensional. Thus efforts at regulation must consider the nature of sexuality, its construction, the gender relationships, and the power relationships between the social actors. The study concludes that more qualitative studies that focus on the regulation of adolescent sexuality and fertility, the plural nature of law and its relationship with other non-legal forms of social regulation are crucial, if the complexity of this process is to be better understood.

An investigation into ESL students' academic writing needs : the case of agriculture students in Egerton University, Kenya

Author: Kurgatt, K P

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: English as a second language/University students/Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks

Author: Ochanda, H

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 1994

Holding Libraries: International Livestock Research Institute Library ;

Subject Terms: Ticks ; Theileria parva ; Rhipicephalus ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Trade liberalisation in small open economies : the case of Kenya

Author: Ng'eno, N K C A

Awarding University: University of Warwick, England

Level : PhD

Year: 1990

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Trade liberalization ; Economic policy ;

Abstract:

The object of this thesis is to determine the consequences of trade liberalisation on the Kenyan economy. This is done by simulating the effects of tariff reduction, devaluation of domestic currency and export subsidies. In addition, the effects of quantitative controls and markup pricing are simulated. The structure of the economy is modelled through the specification of alternative closure rules. Policy changes are simulated using a computable general equilibrium model (CGE). A nine sector model based on a Social Accounting Matrix is constructed using the TV-approach to modelling introduced by Drud, Grais and Pyatt (1986). We depart from neoclassical models, and therefore other CGE models of Kenya, by assuming product differentiation between domestic goods and imports and between gross output sales to domestic and export markets. Our model is essentially Keynesian but for comparative purposes, neoclassical closures are specified in some simulations. In general, the basis argument for or against trade liberalisation concerns its contribution to economic growth. The neoclassicals argue that by improving efficient allocation of resources, liberalisation stimulates higher economic growth. The structuralists, on the other hand, argue that because of structural rigidities in LDC economies and because of unfavourable international conditions, liberalisation will have minimal efect on economic growth. CGE models are useful in sorting out these arguments. It should be noted however that the assumptions underlying these models often reflect the modeller's view about the structure of the economy. The usefulness of CGE models for policy purposes will therefore depend on how realistic they reflect the structure of the economy being modelled. The results of our model show that the gains from trade liberalisation, in terms of the growth of real GDP, are low. This applies to both neoclassical and Keynesian closures. However, it is shown that changes in returns to factors, consumption levels and aggregate price levels, depending on the closure adopted, are significant. This is also true for the policy effects on exports, imports and on the prices and quantities at the sectoral level. These results reinforce the view that for policy purposes it is important that the model being used reflects the structure of the economy under consideration. It also means that it will not make sense to have tailor made policy recommendations for all LDCs.(