177 Records out of 22207 Records

Red palm oil consumption and its contribution to vitamin A status of women of reproductive age in Matayos Division, Busia District, Kenya

Author: Cheboswony, Rosemary Jepkosgei

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Oils and fats ; Palm oil ; Women ; Vitamin A ; Matoyos Division, Busia District ; Nutrition ;

Abstract:

Vitamin A deficiency (V AD) is a public health concern globally and women of reproductive age are vulnerable. In Western Kenya, prevalence of acute and moderate V AD is 6.9% and 58.7% respectively among women. Dietary diversification is a long term approach that can control many nutrient deficiencies. Red palm oil is the highest plant source of provitamin A carotenoids providing 6700 ug REI100 g and can be used as an affordable food source to combat VAD. Farmers in Matayos division process oil palm fruits into cooking oil. However, its uses, consumption and effect on vitamin A status among women of reproductive age in the area is unknown, hence the purpose of this study. The study adopted an Ex-post facto research design. A total sample of 241 women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) from palm oil users (Matayos Division) and non-users (Budalangi division) was randomly selected to represent the population. A sample size of 123 subjects (51.3%) was selected to provide blood samples for serum retinol analysis. A researcher administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Food Frequency Questionnaire and a 24-Hour Dietary Recall were also used to collect data. Vitamin A intake was calculated using Nutrisurvey for windows computer software. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.5. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the data. Correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between variables. Student's t-test was used to compare means between variables. Results show that all households in palm oil producing area used the oil for cooking while only 0.8% used the oil for soap production. Women consumed 11.8 g of the palm oil per day. There was no statistical difference of total intake of vitamin A between the women from palm oil growing area and nongrowing area (1339.45 ug ? 808.5 verses 1070.05 ug ? 1032.9). However, when vitamin A contribution of mango in the diet was excluded, there was a significantly higher intake attributed to palm oil users group verses non-users group (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in means of serum retinol concentrations of palm oil users and non-users with means being 0.60 ? 0.21 and 0.62 ? 0.19 umol/l respectively. The results of this study indicate that consumption of palm oil by women of reproductive age improved their amounts of vitamin A intake. However, women are still vitamin A deficient (below 0.70 umol/l of WHO guidelines for marginal VAD). The study shows potential of red palm oil in improving vitamin A status and therefore promotion of oil palm production and palm oil consumption need to be encouraged.

Efficiency and effectiveness of dissemination pathways : a case study of push-pull technology for stemborers and striga weeds control in western Kenya

Author: Murage, Alice Wakukira

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Stem borers ; Stem borers ; Chilo partellus ; Busseola fusca ; Striga hermonthica ; Striga asiatica ; Farmers ; Homa Bay District ; Kisii District ; Busia District ; Bungoma District ; Agricultural Extension work ;

Abstract:

Food security in Kenya is potentially challenged by increased infestation of maize fields by cereal stemborers (mainly Chilo partellus Swinhoe and Busseola fusca Fuller) and parasitic Striga weeds (mainly Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth. and Striga asiatica (L.) Kuntze). The conventional control measures for these pests have had limited acceptance by smallholder farmers in the region due to various socio-economic and environmental effects. The 'push-pull' technology (PPT), developed by the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) together with other collaborators, has been well evaluated by smallholder farmers as an effective method for controlling the two pests. However, this technology is relatively knowledge intensive, thus realization of maximum adoption will depend on how well-trained farmers are, via effective and efficient dissemination pathways. The information on efficiency and effectiveness of dissemination pathways is scanty in literature. This study therefore sought to fill this gap in order to proffer better targeting of resources in an efficient dissemination strategy. Both primary and secondary data were used in this evaluation. A total of 491 randomly selected respondents from Homabay, Kisii, Busia and Bungoma districts were interviewed, and secondary data were obtained from project records in ICIPE-Mbita. Data were analysed using: a weighted score index; an ordered probit model for pathway preference ranking; a two limit tobit for pathways' effects on adoption; a duration model for pathways' effects on the speed of adoption; and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for efficiency analysis. The results from the weighted score index show that field days (FD) were the most preferred dissemination pathway, followed by farmer field schools (FFS) and farmer teachers (FT). The tobit and duration model results show that FD had the highest impact on the level and intensity, and the speed of adoption, respectively, whereas the DEA results show that FD was relatively more efficient compared to FFS and FT in the short run; but in the long run, FTs were more efficient. Considering that the pathways are not mutually exclusive, it is imperative to account for the complimentary roles of the various pathways in strengthening the uptake of PPT technology. The dissemination pathways would be more effective if the target population is well segmented and appropriate pathways utilised for the various farmer segments. The findings of this study contribute to the framework for ICIPE and other research institutions to examine both their human and financial strategies in order to invest in dissemination strategies that are relevant, efficient and effective.

Analysis of structure, conduct and performance of sweet potato marketing: the case of Nairobi and Kisumu, Kenya

Author: Gichangi, Anne Wanjogu

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Ipomoea batatases ; Marketing ; Nairobi ; Kisumu ; Kenya ; Ipomoea batatas ;

Abstract:

Sweetpotato has the potential of contributing significantly to Kenya's national objective of enhancing food security. The crop withstands drought and it is easy to grow. It can also play an important role in the diets of many rural households. Despite this importance, sweetpotato is not adequately market-oriented and competitiveness of smallholder farmers is limited by low productivity and poor quality of traditional varieties. The crop is source. of raw material for agricultural industries. The organizational structure of Kenya's sweet potato industry and its performance are not well documented. The study aimed at assessing the structure, conduct and performance of sweetpotato marketing system in Nairobi and Kisumu, identify and characterize the opportunities and constraints on market participants which influence its performance .. Data used for analysis in this work was collected using a formal survey instrument during 2009. The survey instrument was specially designed to track the alternative channels used in sweetpotato transactions and to capture the associated prices, volumes, and transaction costs in the source and final markets along the value chain. The results showed that the sweetpotato market is very concentrated with a Gini Coefficient of 0.71 for Nairobi and a Gini coefficient of 0.56 was observed for the Kisumu markets. Initial capital requirements were seen as the major constraint with an average working capital of about Kenya shillings 45,000for Nairobi traders, compared to Kisumu with an average of Kenya shillings 15000. Over 75% respondents had used their own source of capital for their respective trading activities. On average, 82.1 % of the total sampled . sweetpotato traders had access to current sweetpotato market price information. The results indicated that majority (>70%) of the sweetpotato traders relied on two market information sources, mainly, that of word of mouth from friends/ business colleagues/ relatives, and that of trader's own market observation. Analysis of market conduct indicated that not much of sweetpotato sales promotion was carried out apart from some sorting and grading. According to the survey results, the formation of the sweetpotato price mainly depended on the spontaneous regulation of the sweetpotato market; the setting of price among the actors mainly relied on free bargaining price. Transport represented by far the largest component of marketing costs, accounting for more than 50% of the total market cost. The most limiting factor (40% of the respondents) was lack of standard measure, the second (33% of the respondents) lack of market information.

Analysis of flavour and molecular diversity of Kenyan lablab bean (lablab purpureus (L.) sweet) accessions

Author: Kimani, Esther Nyambura

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Lablab beans/Lablab purpureus/Genetics/ ;

Abstract:

The legume species Lablab purpureus L. Sweet grows in most tropical environments. It is used as a cover crop and green manure and provides a high-protein food for humans and livestock feed. The study was carried out to analyse flavour components and molecular diversity of Kenyan lab lab accessions. Twenty four accessions from the National genebank and farmers were evaluated for odour and bitter taste intensities using sensory tests. Analysis of cyanogenic glycosides was carried out using the picrate method and volatile compounds were isolated and separated using gas chromatography. The genetic diversity of 50 accessions was studied using Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The sensory evaluations showed significant (p::::0.05) differences for the bitter taste but none for odour. Accession 10706 and 13096 exhibited the highest and lowest means respectively for both bitter and odour taste. The levels of cyanogenic glycosides were not different for the 24 accessions, but significant (p::::0.05) differences were observed in the volatile compounds isolated from the accessions with upto 89% similarity of the accessions. Two hundred and sixty two volatile compounds were identified using literature databases. The molecular study revealed a total of 180 polymorphic bands. The overall mean expected heterozygosity (He) for all the populations was 0.189. The Eastern population had the highest He of 0.297. The plot of the first and second principal coordinates for cluster analysis revealed an overlap of the accessions forming a tight cluster, with the exception of four; namely Mwingi-3 and 12000 from Eastern population, 12187R3 and 10706Rl from Coast and Rift Valley populations. The Unweighted pair group using mathematical arithmetic averages (upGMA) cluster analysis generated from the distance matrix revealed three major groups. Group 1 had accessions 10706Rl and Mwingi-J, group 2 had accessions 12187R3 and 12000, while group 3 had the rest of the accessions. The low diversity revealed from these results may be due to the narrow genetic base for breeding stocks, and exchange of germplasm across the country. Results obtained from this study will be of great help in lab lab accession management by ensuring maximization of exploitation of this vital resource as well as in developing breeding strategies for Lablab purpureus.

Factors affecting uptake of urban agricultural interventions for HIV/AIDS affected households : a case of poor urban households in Nakuru municipality, Kenya

Author: Muriithi, Gideon Muchiri

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Nakuru, Kenya ; Urban agriculture ; HIV (infection) ; AIDS (disease) ; Poverty ; Gender ; Food security ;

Abstract:

This study focused on the sociological and project design related factors affecting the uptake of urban agricultural (UA) intervention for the poor urban HIV I AIDS affected households in Nakuru Municipality. Objectives of the study were; to assess the link between socio-cultural and socio-economics status and uptake, to evaluate the link between project design's related factors and uptake and to capture individual's social life history and relate it to uptake of intervention. of Food shortage and of good quality is a common phenomenon in the slums where these kinds of households are found. It is disheartening to observe that only a few are embracing UA. Theoretical framework used encompassed; Innovation-Diffusion Model and Rational Choice Theories. Cross-sectional survey and case study research designs were employed for the quantitative and qualitative data respectively. Sixty two households were sampled for the survey and six in-depth case studies. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were performed for the survey by SPSS version 15. In-depth interviews for the case studies were transcribed and individual cases reported. Based on results, Majority 43% of the respondents' age ranged from 40-49 years. Respondents' age had a significant relationship with uptake of the intervention. On gender of the household's head, majority (78%) were women and showed a significant relationship with uptake of the intervention. Majority (63%) sourced labour beyond self. Labour source had a significant relationship with uptake of the intervention. Most households (63%) reported to increase their income by embracing the UA intervention and showed a significant relationship. Majority (63%) gained social benefits by embracing the intervention. They singled the benefits as; reduced stigma raised their social status and enhanced scope of friends. Socioeconomics factors such as age, gender of the head of household, accessibility of labour and impact of intervention on income featured prominently to influence the uptake. Theories nurtured the decision making of the household to embrace the intervention while synthesized by rational choice theory for the household to opt in making a rational choice of embracing the intervention. A project on UA for HIV I AIDS affected households should target elderly persons mostly women and integrate socio-psychological counseling in their programs. Non-rain fed UA is most appropriate for HIV I AIDS affected households and sustainability of the project. Apart from medical treatment a HIV I AIDS individual should have an access to quality food as well. Further research on uptake of other crops and livestock by identifying their social role in alleviating food insecurity among the urban poor HIV I AIDS affected households.

A comparative analysis of the structure and performance of Agricultural science and technology policy system in Kenya and Uganda

Author: Godiah, Lawrence Mugunieri

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Agriculture ; Policy making ; Technology ;

Abstract:

Despite the acknowledged importance of agricultural science and technology (AS&T), little is known about the structure and performance of AS&T policy system in developing countries. The structure and performance of this policy system in Kenya and Uganda was analysed using a preliminary 'system components-shift effects' framework. The system components comprised of agricultural research, extension, education and transboundary technology transfer. The impact of these components was modified by three-levels of shifteffects: policy environment, institutional arrangements and micro-conditions to give a 3x4 matrix of potential determinants of system structure. The structure was hypothesised to exist in three different generations: first, second and third. Uganda was presumed a first generation system and Kenya second. The potential system structure was separately related to three performance indicators, namely; technical efficiency, technical change and efficiency change using different econometric techniques in order to delineate important determinants of structure. The results indicated that the preliminary three-level framework can be used as an effective tool for delineating the structure of AS&T policy system in developing countries. Furthermore, the structure of the policy system differed between the first and second generation systems. At policy level, transboundary technology transfer was significant and positive only in second generation systems whereas agricultural education and research expenditures were important in both. At institutional level, intellectual property rights regulatory system had impact only in second generation systems, agricultural extension decentralisation had negative effect in first generation systems, whereas agricultural research coordination had no impact in both systems. At micro-Ievel,literacy within the agricultural labour force was significant in second generation but not in first. However, domestic research outputs had significant impact in first generation systems but not second. The same applied to policies geared towards reducing transaction costs in accessing technologies. These results imply that generation specific AS&T policies should be encouraged instead of collective generic policies for all developing countries. Although lack of data precluded effective application of the three-level framework, this study offers opportunities for further research in this area, which has previously been driven by data and not ideas.

Analytical determination of the effects of phosphatic fertilizers and manure on maize yields in acidic soils in Kisii and Rachuonyo districts

Author: Ademba, Jacob Sospeter

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Maize ; Zea mays ; Soil fertility ; Soil acidity ; Fertilizers ; Manures ; Striga hermonthica ; Kisii Central District ; Rachuonyo District ;

Abstract:

Maize production in sub-Saharan Africa remains low and the yields are on the decline. This has been attributed to a variety of factors which include soil nutrient depletion and Striga infestation. Soil phosphorous, nitrogen and. Striga hermonthica are the major constraints to maize production in Nyanza Province of Kenya. The yields are typical of low input systems ranging below 1.0 t ha-I against a potential of5.0 t ha-I per season. In an attempt to overcome these constraints, field trials were conducted at two on-farm sites, Bototo in Kisii Central district and Kabondo in Rachuonyo district, in Nyanza Province of Kenya. The trials were conducted during the long and short rains seasons in 2007. The study investigated the effects of phosphatic fertilizers and manure on nutrient uptake, nutrient use efficiency, maize yields and soil nutrients content at harvest in both sites. A Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) was used with the farmers as replicates. Farmers in Bototo plant H614 variety while those in Kabondo plant H513 maize variety. Plots were top dressed with Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) fertilizer at a uniform rate of 30 kg N ha,' Diammonium Phosphate (DAP), Minjingu Rock Phosphate (MRP) and Triple Super Phosphate (TSP) fertilizers were applied at a rate of 60 kg ha' P~5 and farmyard manure (FYM) at 10 t ha'. One rate of P (60 kg ha' P205) was applied on all the P sources and a no P treatment (check) plus lime only treatment was included in determining the effects due to the applied P in the acidic soils. Complete soil chemical analysis was done in all the plots. To assess the effects of phosphorus fertilizers and manure and estimate the nutrient content and uptake of major nutrients, plant and soil samples were analyzed using standard methods. There were significant (P:s 0.01) crop growth vigor response to the fertilizers and manure due to treatments at both sites. There were significant (P:s 0.01) grain yield, total dry matter yield and harvest index responses to phosphate fertilizers and manure treatments at both sites. Phosphate fertilizers and manure treatments had significant (P:S 0.01) effects on Striga emergence at both sites. Striga emergence correlated weakly with phosphate fertilizers and manure treatments and strongly with grain yield at both sites. Nutrient uptake and removal by the crop significantly (P:S 0.01) increased due to fertilizers and manure application, with a corresponding reduction in the total soil N, P, K, Ca and Mg. Phosphate fertilizers and manure application significantly (P:S 0.01) increased available soil phosphorus, agronomic phosphorus use efficiency (APUE) and physiological phosphorus use efficiency (PPUE) in both sites. The results indicate that phosphate fertilizers and manure applications are essential to improve maize yield, nutrient phosphorus use efficiency and the applied nitrogen reduced the impacts of Striga hermonthica damage to maize yields.

Socio-cultural and socio-economic participatory monitoring and evaluation indicators used in adopting improved cassava varieties by communities in Kuria and Migori districts, Kenya

Author: Tana, Paul Ochieng'

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Manihot esculenta/Food security/Kuria District/Migori District/Farmers/Participation/Participation/Social change/Socioeconomic factors/ ;

Abstract:

Cassava production is critical to household food security in Kuria and Migori Districts. The adoption of improved cassava varieties has been low largely due to non-participatory extension approaches. PM&E at the community level is a relatively new approach and there has been considerable lack of emphasis on community-based monitoring and evaluation indicators during the development of technologies in Kenya. This study investigated the socio-cultural and economic based monitoring and evaluation indicators used by Kuria and Luo Communities in adopting improved cassava varieties in the two districts. The study design was cross-sectional survey. The study used both qualitative and quantitative participatory survey tools. Stratified proportionate random sampling was used to select 184 households and 8 farmer groups for the study. The study used a structured questionnaire to collect data from farmers in order to obtain information relating to the use of local M&E indicators used for the selection and adoption of cassava varieties in the two districts. Focus group discussion was used to initially identify socio-cultural and economic PM&E in the two communities. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Computer Programme. Data analyses used included both descriptive and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics used included percentages, means and standard deviation while Independent t-test and Rank order correlation were used for inferential statistics at the 5% level of significance (oc = 0.05). The study identified socio-cultural and economic community-based PM&E Indicators for selection and adoption of cassava varieties in the two districts. The study found no significant differences and significant differences in some of the socio-cultural and economic indicators. The study also found that the adoption of improved cassava varieties is low in the two districts. The identified community-based participatory monitoring and evaluation indicators would help in enhancing scaling up of cassava technology development, packaging and technology dissemination strategies by researchers, extension agents and farmers. The study recommends the incorporation of local indicators during development and dissemination of technologies by research institutions as this would help in enhancing the uptake of new technologies developed.

Diversity of banana streak virus in Kenya

Author: Karanja, Laura Shali

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Bananas/Plantains/Musa spp./Banana Streak Virus/Viruses/Classification/ ;

Abstract:

Banana streak virus (BSV) is a serious constraint to production of banana and plantain (Musa spp.) in sub saharan Africa. BSV has been found to be present in virtually all the commercial banana cultivars in Kenya. Various studies have reported that banana streak virus is caused by a range of BSV isolates. The ability to quickly and reliably detect BSV is a pre-requisite to the management of the virus. A variability study of BSV in Kenya was carried out to develop suitable diagnostic techniques. Transmission of the disease is through several species of mealy-bug (Planococcus spp) but more significant transmission is through infected vegetative propagation materials. In some Musa hybrids and derived cultivars, integration of BSV into the plant genome can cause subsequent infection when triggered by stress factors such as drought, tissue culture, temperature and genoMic hybridization. In vitro propagation has been identified as one of the main activation triggers of integrated sequences to cause systemic (episomal) banana streak disease (BSD). This was especially observed in the B genome containing AAAB hybrids (FHIA 18 and FHIA Ol/Goldfinger). The heterogeneous nature of the virus in the field hinders reliable detection by serological techniques. Integrated BSV sequences cause problems in direct molecular detection of virus particles by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hence, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) -based techniques, following serological trapping of the virus, immune-capture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) has been found most reliable in detection of BSV. The main objective of this study was to identify BSV isolates in Kenyan banana cultivars. Factors affecting the infection and expression of BSV were studied to optimize the diagnostic protocol in order to help with virus indexing and consequently mass production of BSV-free banana seedlings. The work was accomplished through random collection of field banana material from various banana growing regions, serological analysis using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit which confirmed 87% BSV infection. Isolation of nucleic acid from infected leaf samples, molecular characterization of BSV and sequence analysis of the clones enabled identification of about seven isolates. Three of the seven isolates, were new isolates. Genome-based methods of detection such as nucleic acid hybridization and PCR amplification were used. Through screening of various antibodies and primers, their effectiveness in detecting BSV was determined. Tissue culture materials of 15 cultivars were evaluated for BSV re-infection and expression so as to determine the tolerant cultivars under field and greenhouse conditions and stage of infection and expression. Environmental factors such as nutrition that affect the expression of BSV were also studied. Statistical analysis system (SAS) for ANOV A and various bioinformatics packages were used for analysis of data for the experiments. Results indicated that BSV is associated with increase of growth time, decrease of plant height, girth, number of leaves and high nitrogen levels. Cultivar, location and season also played a critical role in the expression of BSV. The study also confirmed that detection of new isolates was influenced by antibody type, concentration and antigen concentration. The available antibodies have limitations in comprehensive detection of BSV. However, uses of genomic techniques were more effective than serological techniques. Based on amplification, cloning, sequencing, phylogenetic analyses and pairwise comparison of the nucleotide sequence similarities of 80 ~'o and above (proposed criteria by International committee on Taxonomy of viruses (ICTV), three new isolates of BS V were identified and confirmed for the first time in Kenya. The isolates were Khabusi2 from Mt. Elgon region (EAH - AAA genome), Lisulya from Kisii region (EAH - AAA) and Nshule from Kisii region (EAH - AAA).

Use of legumes and lime to improve soil fertility and control sheep sorrel (Rumex acetosella L.) weed in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) in Timboroa, Kenya

Author: Kiiya, Wycliffe Wabwille

Awarding University: Egerton University, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Lime/Soil fertility/Legumes/Sheep sorrel USE Rumex acetosella/Rumex acetosella/Solanum tuberosum/Lupins/Lupinus alba/Purple vetch/Vicia benghalensis/Pisum sativum/Weeds/ ;

Abstract:

Low soil pH and infertility exacerbated by continuous cultivation without adequate replenishment of mined nutrients, coupled with total harvest of crop residues as livestock feeds, have led to the spread of weeds in the North Rift, Kenya. This has resulted in low potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield averaging 7t as opposed to the potential of 30 t ha-1 or more. A focused farm survey, four field experiments and a greenhouse study were undertaken at Timboroa from long rains 2002 to short rains 2004 to determine the influence of household and farm characteristics on soil fertility, weed types and their distribution, to screen and identify suitable legumes for growing in the region for use as green manures / smother crops in the control of weeds, with special emphasis of sheep sorrel (Rumex acetosella L.) weed. The effectiveness of lime applied at 0 or 6 t ha-1 alone or combined with CAN applied on potatoes at three rates (0, 60 or 120 kg N ha-1) in controlling sheep sorrel weed was also investigated. Phosphorus was applied at potato planting stage as TSP at a uniform rate of 90 kg P ha-1. The survey and soil analysis confirmed that soils in the region were acidic with pH (H20) of 4.3 and were deficient in P, Ca and Mg. The survey also showed that inadequate quantities of farmyard manure was used on crops because few livestock were kept. In the screening experiment, lupine (Lupinus albus L.) and purple vetch (Vicia benghalensis L.) gave significantly (p<0.05) higher ground cover and biomass than other legumes and were identified as the best bets for the region. Soil incorporation of lupine and garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) significantly (p<0.05) reduced sheep sorrel weed biomass by 18.0% and 9.0%, respectively while application of 120 kg N ha-1 together with incorporation of lupine reduced sheep sorrel weed density equivalent to hand weeding twice. Potato yields increased with N application only up to 60 kg N ha-1 but continued increasing in limed plots suggesting availability of more nutrients such as P and Ca with reduced soil acidity. The lack of significant potato yield increase beyond 60 kg N ha-1 when only N was applied was attributed to more potato vegetative growth at the expense of tuber production. Liming alone significantly (p<0.05) reduced sheep sorrel weed density and biomass resulting in increased potato yields. The study established that wild radish (Rhaphanus raphanistrum L.) weed density and biomass increased with liming, suggesting that the weed should not be allowed to form seed if lime is to be adopted a strategy for controlling sheep sorrel weed.