4 Records out of 22207 Records

Sedentarization, seasonality, and economic differentiation.

Author: Fujita, Masako

Awarding University: University of Victoria, Canada

Level : MA

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Anthropology ; Nutrition ; Pastoralists ; Ariaal (African people) ; Rendille (African people) ; Northern Kenya ;

Abstract:

This thesis examines the impact of the recent transition from nomadic pastoralism to sedentism and concomitant economic differentiation upon seasonal patterns in maternal diet, morbidity, and anthropometry made by Ariaal and Rendille peoples in northern Kenya. Results reveal clear differences between the dietary patterns of nomadic and sedentary mothers. The reduction of dietary protein, the increase in dietary energy, and the alleviation of seasonal dietary stress affected sedentary mothers' body compositions such that their body fat and protein stores fluctuated in a distinct manner each from the other. Morbidity patterns of sedentary mothers reflected neither the dietary seasonality nor the seasonal patterns of rainfall, both of which were important determinants of nomadic mothers' health statuses. The results demonstrate the importance of longitudinal research design in studying and understanding the consequences of sedentarization.

Who gets to go to school? Parental schooling choices among the Ariaal Rendille of northern Kenya.

Author: Giles, Joyce Lynn

Awarding University: University of Victoria, Canada

Level : MA

Year: 2001

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Rendille (African people) ; Ethnology ; Parents and parenting ; Girls ; Education ; Karare ; Marsabit District ;

Abstract:

An enormous literature details the benefits of educating female children with respect to lowered fertility and infant/child mortality levels. Far less examined are patterns of parental decision-making with respect to selecting specific children for schooling. This thesis uses logistic regression methodology to delineate parental decision-making patterns concerning childhood education in the Ariaal Rendille community of Karare, Marsabit District, northern Kenya. Results reveal clear, predictable parental strategies reflecting specific household characteristics and larger cultural traditions.

Evaluation framework for the development of an alternative form of education for marginalized youth in Nairobi.

Author: McAdam, Jacqueline Loreen

Awarding University: University of Victoria, Canada

Level : MA

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Vocational education ; Curricula ; Nairobi, Kenya ;

Abstract:

This case study documents how an alternative form of education developed in Canada, the Canadian Work Orientation Workshop (WOW) model, was translated into the context of Nairobi, Kenya to assist marginalized youth. Aspects including program relevance, program feasibility, program development, program implementation, program relationships, program recommendations, and program sustainability are considered within an evaluation framework. The Kenya WOW model presents a promising alternative form of education for marginalized youth which can strengthen their integration into the informal employment sector, an area where youth are often exploited in developing countries. This evaluative process provides valuable information regarding the development of services for marginalized youth and offers a framework for informing a similar process in other developing countries.

Immunodiagnosis of human African sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei).

Author: Liu, Margaret Kim Mong

Awarding University: University of Victoria, Canada

Level : PhD

Year: 1990

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Immunoassay ; Sleeping sickness USE Trypanosomiasis ; Trypanosoma brucei ; Trypanosomiasis ; Cercopithecus aethiops ;

Abstract:

Procyclic culture forms of Trypanosoma brucei species and antibodies to these parasites were used in developing antibody-detection and antigen-detection assays for diagnosis of African human sleeping sickness. An agglutination assay using live procyclic trypanosomes-- the Procyclic Agglutination Trypanosomiasis Test (PATT) was developed for detecting anti-trypanosome antibodies in the sera of trypanosome-infected Vervet monkeys and humans. Antibodies to procyclic surface antigens were detected by the PATT in sera of Vervet monkeys as early as 7 days post-infection with T. B. Rhodesiense. Positive agglutination titres were obtained with sera from monkeys with active, untreated infections and with sera taken soon after successful drug cure. Similar positive agglutination results were also observed using the PATT with sera from T. B. Gambiense-infected patients from Cote d'Ivoire and Sudan and with documented sera from T. B. Rhodesiense-infected patients from Kenya. No agglutination reactions were observed with preinfection sera from Vervet monkeys, with sera from uninfected Canadians or with sera from Americans working in endemic areas. Together these results confirm the diagnostic value of using procyclic trypanosomes to detect anti- trypanosome antibodies in human African sleeping sickness. A double antibody sandwich elisa using monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal rabbit antibodies to the surface membrane antigens of procyclic trypanosomes was developed. This assay detected circulating trypanosomal antigens in the sera of trypanosome-infected mice and in the sera from parasite-infected patients. However, limited success was obtained with this sandwich elisa when tested on a larger repertoire of sera from infected humans. Rabbit antibodies made against whole lysates of T. B. Rhodesiense procyclics were then employed in an antigen-trapping sandwich ELISA. Trypanosomal antigens were detected in the sera of parasitologically confirmed monkeys and patients but not in preinfection sera nor in control sera from uninfected North Americans. Identification of diagnostically useful antigens was attempted in order to facilitate the adaptation of these diagnostic assays to a simpler format for field application. Pooled sera obtained from trypanosome- infected patients was used as a probe to detect trypanosome antigens separated by high performance liquid chromatography, immunoaffinity and immunoblotting techniques. The results showed that these mabs and their antigens were useful in the diagnosis of African human sleeping sickness. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)