7 Records out of 22207 Records

Isis and Asiis, Eastern Africa's Kalinjiin people and their pharaonic origin legend : a comparative study

Author: Araap Sambu, Kipkoeech

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level : Doctor of Literature

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: University of South Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Kalenjin (African people) ; Semitic languages ; Cross-cultural studies ; Kalenjin language ;

Abstract:

The Kalenjiin-speaking people of Eastern Africa have maintained a popular tradition that their ancestors came from farther north, from a place that they various y call Tto and Misiri (Egypt). So much part of the oral tradition has this claim been that the first informants to talk to the incoming colonial officers and their compatriot anthropologists at the close of the 19th. century, inevitably repeated it to them. Those visitors duly entered the traditions into their political and anthropological records. However little was done by way of an attempt to either validate or dismiss this claim of origin except for brief debates in the early 20th century colonial press. The author decided to investigate this claim in the interest of his own community and posterity. It was a pioneering work, naturally, and the result was a string of discoveries. Consequently a disciplined scholarly approach to further research became an imperative, hence this doctoral project. This project is based on the following premises: (I) That if the Kalenjiin claim were to be seen to be valid, then their chief cultural expression, their language, had to have a verifiable relationship, at the genetic level, with the language spoken by the Egyptian population that they claim to have branched away from in greater antiquity. This necessitated the extensive comparative linguistic work, chiefly: (a) lexicostatistical analysis that is based on hard-to-drop basic words of language, and (b) syntactical analysis that is based on equally hard-to-change aspects of grammar. (2) Similarly, the traditional religion of the Kalenjiin had to feature an appreciable amount of parallelism with the religion(s) of ancient Egypt as well as with its . likely offshoots, Judaism and Christianity being the most visible of them. Are the respective ancient Egyptian and Kalenjiin names for Deity: 'Isis' and 'Asiis', sheer coincidences, or are they mere mispronunciations of each other? Comparative work based on the aspect of religion and the related narratives that are either the pith or the sheath of religion constitute the bulk of this thesis. The oft-unrecognised need to separate ancient Egyptian polytheistic mythology from true ancient Egyptian monotheistic religion is addressed.

Eastern Africa's Kalenjin People and their Pharaonic Origin Legend : a comparative study

Author: Kipkoech, Arap Sambu

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level :

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: Moi University Margaret Thatcher Library ;

Subject Terms: Traditions/Culture/History/Language/Kalenjin language/Indigenous religions/Kalenjin (African people)/Egyptian civilization/ ;

Abstract:

The Kalenjin-speaking people of Eastern Africa have maintained a popular tradition that their ancestors came from farther north, from a place that they variously call Tto and Misiri (Egypt). So much part of the oral tradition has this claim been that the first informants to talk to the incoming colonial officers and their compatriot anthropologists at the close of the 19th century, inevitably repeated it to them those visitors duly entered the traditions into their political and anthropological records. However little was done by way of an attempt to either validate or dismiss this claim of origin except for brief debates in the early 20th century colonial press. The author decided to investigate this claim in the interest of his own community and posterity. It was a pioneering work, naturally, and the result was a string of discoveries. Consequently a disciplined scholarly approach to further research became an imperative, hence this doctoral project. This project is based on the following premises: (1) That if the Kalenjiin claim were to be seen to be valid, then their chief cultural expression, their language, had to have a verifiable relationship, at the genetic level, with the language spoken by the necessitated the extensive comparative linguistic work, chiefly: (a) lexicostatistical analysis that is based on hard-to-drop basic wore's of language, and (b) syntactical analysis that is based on equally hard-to-change aspects of grammar. (2) Similarly, the traditional religion of the Kalenjin had to feature an appreciable amount of parallelism with the religion(s) of ancient Egypt as well as with its likely offshoots, Judaism and Christianity being the most visible of them. Are the respective ancient Egyptian and Kalenjiin names for Deity: 'Isis' and 'Asiis', sheer coincidences, or are they mere mispronunciations of each other? Comparative work based on the aspect of religion and the related narratives that are either the pith or the sheath of religion constitute the bulk of this thesis. The oft-unrecognised need to separate ancient Egyptian polytheistic mythology from true ancient Egyptian monotheistic religion is addressed. Key Terms Alternative spellings are given where applicable: Asiis; Asiisian; Asis; Isis; Ptah; Maat; Ma'at: Kalenjiin language; Kalenjin; Kalenjiin religion; Oorgoiyoot; Orkoiyot;Oral tradition; Comparative religion; Divine kingship; African traditional religion.

Fanning into flame : a spritual gifts-based ministry for churches of the Baptist Convention of Kenya.

Author: Fowlkes, Dane Winstead

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level : MTh

Year: 1998

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Spirituality ; Baptist Convention of Kenya ;

Abstract:

This dissertation investigates the influence of Western missionaries upon African Christians in general and more specifically, Baptists in Kenya. Of particular concern to this study is western influence on the concept and practice of Christian ministry in Kenya Baptist churches. It is asserted that Western missionary influence has been negative upon Kenya Baptist churches in the concept of Christian ministry. Missionaries introduced a distinction between clergy and laity, emphasizing a ministry model of paid clergymen who dominate and drive their respective congregations. This contradicts clear new testament teaching that every believer is a minister and is spiritually gifted to do Christian ministry in the context of the local church. Pastors are needed to equip and free church members to minister. Thus, it is concluded that Baptists in Kenya need to change from following missionary introduced patterns of Christian ministry to that which is spiritual gifts-based and lay dependent.

Mission statement and management of private tertiary religious institutions in Eastern and Southern Africa

Author: Kibuuka, Hudson Eddie

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level : DEd

Year: 1998

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Religious education/Management/ ;

Abstract:

The region of Eastern and Southern Africa has recently experienced an unprecedented development of private tertiary institutions. Most of these institutions are established by religious organisations which, since the inception of education, have been involved in operating educational institutions of lower levels. Although referred to as private institutions, which by definition would imply funding other than the Government sources, these private institutions find themselves, at times requesting the government to fund their development as well as their operations. This study sought to investigate if these private religious institutions have unique raison d'?tre expressed in the form of mission statements. The study also investigated the nature of their management and the management structures in practice. The literature reviewed indicated that private religious institutions have a unique mission based on their basic concept of education and their world view. They seek to pursue and inculcate specific values. Operating in a competitive environment, however, in which their competitors do receive funding from the Government makes the private institutions vulnerable to hardships. The study was conducted using qualitative research approach in three countries, namely Kenya, Uganda and Zimbabwe; involving all degree granting recognised private religious institutions in the sample and focussing on the management. The respondents were chosen by elite purposive and snowball sampling. The main data collection method was the interview. However, document analysis, observations, and a questionnaire were also used. The findings from the data indicate that private religious institutions have unique missions although they are, at times, not expressed in the form of mission statements. As a result some of the stakeholders, including those involved in management, do not get to know what their missions are. The study concludes by emphasising the development of clear mission statements involving the stakeholders in the process and having the mission statements widely disseminated. It is also recommended that training in management is important for the managers of the institutions at various levels. A model of management is proposed for the streamlining the management of the institutions considering the requirements of the national governments as well as those of the religious proprietors.

An assessment of the present teacher upgrading programme at Ramaano Mbulaheni Training Centre (South Africa).

Author: Ravhudzulo, Anniekie Nndowiseni

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level : MEd

Year: 1997

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Teacher education / ;

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to assess the primary teacher upgrading programme at Ramaano Mbulaheni Training Centre (RMTC). The literature review in this work included a selection of related studies and articles in developing countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya and Zimbabwe and in developed countries like Japan, Britain and United States of America. These together formed the theoretical base of the research. A survey was carried out in the Malamulele, Mutale, Sekgosese, Soutpansberg, Thohoyandou and Vuwani areas in the Northern Province region 3, to find out whether the RMTC teacher upgrading programme is serving the purpose of upgrading underqualified primary teachers. An attempt was made to give the necessity of teacher upgrading in South Africa and an assessment was made of the Ramaano Mbulaheni Training Centre upgrading programme.

Demystifying nolle prosequi and its effects on fundamental human rights in Kenya and South Africa.

Author: Mutakha, John Kangu

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level : LLM

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Criminal law ;

Abstract:

The issue of the use of the concept of nolle prosequi by the Kenya Office of the Attorney General to terminate criminal proceedings commenced by either the Attorney General or private prosecutors has in the recent past became controversial. As the controversy rages on, a detailed study of the use of the concept and the effect such use has on fundamental human rights in both Kenya and South Africa has become imperative. This is achieved by setting the concept in its English common law historical background. It is revealed by the study that there has been a gross abuse of the concept in Kenya with resultant violation of fundamental human rights. This abuse seems to be encouraged by the reluctance of the courts to assume supervisory jurisdiction over the exercise of the Attorney General's discretionary powers. Through a detailed reference to the approach adopted by the English and Australian courts, it is submitted that the abuse of the concept can be checked and/or avoided if the Kenya and South African courts play their dutiful role.

Administrative reform with a view to countering conflict between White and Black in South Africa (Afrikaans text).

Author: Nell, Johan Tobias

Awarding University: University of South Africa

Level : DLitt

Year: 1979

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Race relations ; Minority and ethnic groups ;

Abstract:

Political revolution may develop as the result of a complex combination of political, economic and social factors. The latter could stem from the realization in a community that it is being discriminated against by another ethnic or racial group which may be either different or similar to it. Such discrimination usually leads to frustrations and the development of political groups which may attempt, by means of various methods (of which insurgency is the most general), to overthrow that authority responsible for such discrimination and frustrations. By satisfying the aims of such political groups, a conflict situation could be prevented. Combating a political revolution already in existence requires joint and co-ordinated action by a state authority based on a strategy of control, isolation and the eradication of political revolutionaries. The factors which led to political revolutions in Algeria, Angola, Indo-China, Kenya, Cuba, Malaya, Mozambique and Rhodesia, originated primarily from denying a portion of the population participation in governmental processes and permitting discrimination in the economic and social areas. To eliminate this discrimination, some political groups in the countries mentioned primarily employed insurgency. Government actions to counter this in these countries varied from defensive measures to aggressive action and the employment of a strategy of control, isolation and eradication of insurgency forces by means of joint and co-ordinated state action. Urban-oriented Black political groups in White South Africa demand participation in the political decision- making processes and the removal of all forms of discrimination. Alternatively the violent overthrow of the White government and its replacement by a Black majority government is advocated. Homeland-orientated political parties, however, demand more territory, economic and agricultural development in the homelands, and homeland consolidation. On account of the high growth of the Black population, the South African government can increasingly not satisfy the political and other demands of urban-orientated Black political groups, on ideological grounds and as a result of its financial inability. The provision of more homeland territory, economic development in it and the consolidation of these homelands is also directly related to the high increase in the Black population and what will probably be an increasing inability on the part of homeland governments to, without assistance from the South African government, provide for the financial, economic and social needs of the homelands, especially after 1980. The conclusion is that the co-existence in South Africa of a numerically superior developing Black community and a numerically inferior developing White community which maintains its authority in all fields by means of discriminatory legislation and practices, has led to cultural conflict, inferiority and eventual frustrations amongst the numerically superior Black population. Measured against the factors that caused political revolutions in various countries, there exists, therefore, already a conflict situation between White and Black in specifically white urban areas in South Africa. To counter the White-Black conflict situations identified in South Africa, comprehensive administrative reforms are suggested. These reforms are based on the model of separate development and of which political independence (by implication therefore participation in decision- taking processes also for the urban Blacks) and economic inter-dependence for every population group, should constitute the joint aim. With a view to this end, it is argued, inter alia, that a top-level committee should draw up a master development plan for South Africa; that recommended practices be applied which could lead to a decrease in Black birth rate in order that the needs of the Black could be met more effectively; that homelands be consolidated into geo-political units with strategi