92 Records out of 22207 Records

Competitiveness in the Kenyan domestic aviation market : an exploratory study

Author: Ahamed, Mwangi Christopher

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Airlines ; Air transportation industry ; Deregulation ; Privatization ;

Abstract:

A competitive transport service is essential for a country's participation in the domestic and international commerce within the current global village arena. That while the economic conditions in the Kenyan deregulated aviation markets are relatively well functioning, these appear substantially different from the deregulated aviation markets of more developed economies.The commercial conduct of major players in the Kenyan aviation markets and the infrastructure at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA), questions whether there is indeed real deregulation and level playing field for all and potential carriers in the Kenyan aviation market or the presence and guidance of identifiable strategic moves in their operations.Lessons from other countries and the advent established carriers to the Kenyan market, call for a strategic re-orientation of the aviation market lest Kenyan operators despite the enviable infrastructure and geographical positioning are reduced to mere spectators in the dynamic aviation arena.This thesis seeks to explore, understand and identify probable obstacles to the competitiveness of

Key success factors for profitability in microfinance institutions in Kenya

Author: Rina, Karina Hicks

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Microfinance institutions/Equity Bank Kenya Limited/Financial institutions/ ;

Abstract:

Banks traditionally found the poor and rural clientele risky and expensive to serve.Some banks chose to ignore them altogether, resulting in low penetration of financial services in Kenya.While some micro-finance institutions (MFIs) served the rural and urban poor, there profitability, self sufficiency, and sustainability in the long term remained questionable.It is for this reason that this study sought to establish the specific factors within the operations of MFIs that would enable them to be profitable while serving the poor.There were three main research objectives:Firstly, to find out the structure of the MFI industry in Kenya; secondly, to establish whether banks could be profitable while serving the poor in Kenya; and finally to investigate the key success factors for profitability within the operations of MFIs .Available literature revealed that studies on the profitability and sustainability of MFIs were mostly undertaken in Indonesia, Bangladesh and India.It was evident that while parallels may be drawn, the success of MFIs was context specific and as a result, a gap existed in the study of the performance of MFIs in Kenya.Further, research carried out in Kenya did not take into considerations some of the success factors that had been identified in other countries, and were from a non-governmental (NGO) perspective.A case study of Equity Bank was used.Equity Bank was selected as it was found to be the most profitable MFI in Kenya.It had also transformed the banking industry, making banking affordable accessible to the poor and rural communities.The theorised critical success factors were: adequate delinquency management, low cost of funds, adequate information management systems, shared mission, vision and values, employee motivation, decentralization, and quality leadership.Quantitative data was collected for a financial period of eleven years from 1999 to 2009.Qualitative data was also used through questionnaires and interviews.The results revealed that it is possible to profitably bank the poor and also confirmed that five out of the seven theorised critical success factors would be required for a firm to grow in profitability.Contrary to what was expected, asset and liability management and employee motivation did not have a significant relationship with profitability.Based on these results, specific and actionable recommendations were made that would benefit Equity Bank and other micro-finance institutions operating in Kenya

Determinants of commercial bank profitability in Kenya

Author: Kabuuri, George Ndegwa

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Financial Institutions/Commercial banks/Electronic banking/Banking industry ;

Abstract:

This study explores internal and external factors that influence profitability of commercial banks in Kenya. Like other firms, banks seek to maximize profit by controlling internal factors while managing the impact of external factors on their operations. To maximize profitability and improve stability of the banking sector; managers, policymakers and other banking industry stakeholders need to understand how bank profits are swayed by various factors. Using a panel data set of commercial bank's financial ratios and selected macroeconomic variables, this study applies the generalized least squares regression technique in exploring relationships between selected variables and profitability, drawing from conceptual and empirical literature for insights into the determinants of bank profitability. An inverse relationship between cost to income ratio and bank profitability is detected, which supports attention towards lowering operating costs by Kenyan bank managers in an effort to increase profitability. Even though Kenyan banks continue to embrace innovations such as agent banking, mobile-banking, internet-banking, credit bureau referencing and adoption of new payment systems to improve their operating efficiency, these efficiency gains are yet to transform into lower interest spreads for Kenyans, demonstrating the value of this study from a policy perspective, although spreads are beyond the scope of this study. Another interesting finding is the revelation of a negative relationship between deposits to total assets ratio and return on assets (ROA), this relationship could be a result of the costs banks incur collecting and maintaining deposits such costs include; maintenance of sizable branch networks, interest payment to depositors and costs of raising capital to cover deposits (core capital to total deposits should exceed 8 percent for banks in Kenya). A poor loan portfolio is found to have a significant negative impact on bank profitability while banks with diversified income streams are found to be more profitable. Evidence on macroeconomic determinants is mixed with inflation found to negatively affect bank profitability while change in real gross domestic product (GOP) had no Significant impact on bank profitability over the period 1998 to 2009.

Credit risk in commercial bank lending practices in Kenya

Author: Nyarumba, Gedeon Jared Olili not only short term profitability

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Risk management ; Bank loans ; Nonperforming loans ; Bank management ; Commercial banks ;

Abstract:

Excess credit risk has been known to be a major contributor to bank failures. Some of the symptoms of excess credit risk include high non-performing loans (NPL), high growth in asset base and over optimistic categorisation of customers during credit risk analysis of customer applications among other symptoms. Some of these symptoms have been evident in the Kenyan environment and has in the past resulted in bank failures in Kenya. This research sought to find out lending structures by banks in Kenya and determinants of credit risk. The study is restricted between 1998 and 2008 and employs both qualitative and quantitative data. Regression analysis was conducted to confirm the relationship between credit risk and identified independent variables including type of loan, economic sectors lent to, interest rates and bank credit policies. The results show that although the economic sector receiving/applying for the loans is an important determinant of credit risk, bank credit policies is the most significant determinant of credit risk. This must be strengthened to keep banks sustainable in the long run. Other determinants of credit risk include economic sectors, type of loans, amount of loan and interest rates charged banks. The study recommends the need for banks to strengthen their credit risk policy that guides their day to day lending operations. These policies must be based on research and long term sustainability of the banking business and not only short term profitability

Dairy marketing in Kiambu District

Author: Odhiambo, Robert Rawang

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Supply chains ; Dairy products ; Kiambu District ; Milk ; Kenya Cooperative Creameries ;

Abstract:

The dairy industry in Kenya plays an important role in the lives of many people.Recent research indicates that more than 2 million people are employed in the sub sector in one form or another.Within agriculture, the dairy industry plays an important roles as a contributor to GDP and an important source of livelihood for a huge portion of the Kenyan rural population.Dairy farming is also the only source of year long recurrent revenue from agriculture, though revenue flows do fluctuate with seasons. Kenya Cooperative Creameries (KCC) prior to its collapse in 1997 had a national network of chilling stations and processing and packaging plants.These resources enabled it to be a reliable outlet for all dairy farmers, cushioning smallholder farmers from price fluctuations.The national cold chain ceased to exist with the collapse of KCC.The dairy supply chain has been characterized as one with chaotic distribution, stagnant production and demand, poor returns to producers, low productivity by inefficient smallholder producers, wasted milk that carriers considerable health risks for consumers through poor handling and adulteration (Techno serve Kenya 2008).This characterization applies to the dairy supply chain in Kiambu District.The study examined the relationship between price received and transaction costs in the determination of choice of market outlet(s) by dairy farmers in Kiambu District, using data collected in Kiambu District between August and October 2010.Mode of payment for milk sold, type of buyer and distance to market were identified as the most significant variables in determining the quantity of milk marketed in formal markets.The study also revealed several market challenges encountered by commercial dairy farmers; and suggests the need to re-examine policies underlying the formation and management of dairy farmer cooperative societies in Kenya

Investments in road infrastructure and economic growth : time series analysis of the effects of road network expansions on growth in Kenya

Author: Makajuma, George Adongo

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Governance ; Economic development ; Roads and highways ; Infrastructure ;

Abstract:

Insufficient quality and size of transport infrastructure provision in Kenya remains a major impediment to growth. Interestingly, none of the growth studies in Kenya has provided any quantitative systematic evidence to assess the long-run consequent implications ofunder investment on road infrastructure. Evaluating impacts and communicating the economicsignificance of road infrastructure investments in quantitative terms could provide a more robustevidence-based feedback mechanism for policy makers' economic analysis is fundamental tomaking sound and effective road infrastructure budgetary decisions, informing infrastructurepolicies, and establishing basis for accountability. This research study presents an econometricframework that can be used at the infrastructure strategic planning level to estimate the growtheffects of differing levels of budgetary allocations to road development programmes. Based on data from the Ministry of Finance and using time series analysis, vector autoregressive modelswere estimated that characterize the nature of interaction between public investments in roadinfrastructure and the associated growth effects on the economy. Findings suggest no long runequilibrium relationship between the investments in road infrastructure and economic growth,and that the short run rate of road expenditure explains about 10% of variation in the rate ofeconomic growth. Granger causality runs from the rate of investments in roads to the rate ofeconomic growth. Further, the rate of convergence in the economy by growth rate to shock changes in the rate of road infrastructure spending is gradual.

An Exploratory study on the determinants of internet access penetration in Kenya

Author: Matimu, Nancy Waithira

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Information and Communication Technology ; Internet Access ; Internet ;

Abstract:

This study was undertaken using primary and secondary methods to provide gainful insight on those factors that have shaped internet access penetration in Kenya and hence make conclusions on the determinants thereof. Internet access is viewed as a key enabler for operational efficiency, economic growth and knowledge dissemination world over. It has been the key driver for eliminating cross-border barriers and a catalyst for reducing knowledge asymmetry through the global village concept realization.The core objective was to establish the determinants of internet access in Kenya and how they have influenced market penetration with a view to providing an informed direction on priority areas of contribution and considerations by the academic community, policy makers and the business community respectively in achieving universal access objectives and business growth and profitability objectives. These determinants were organized along the following key themes; socioeconomic determinants (affordability, income levels, demographics, literacy levels), infrastructure (mobile subscriptions, electricity consumption and ICT goods imports) and regulatory factors (regulatory policy and competition). Other factors explored included speed of access, security and locally relevant content availability.The findings of the study showed that a strong positive linear relationship exists between number of internet users and income levels, 15-65 years age set population, literacy level, mobile subscriptions, electricity consumptions and competition. They also showed that a positive linear relationship also exists between internet users and ICT goods imports albeit weak. Affordability (price of internet access) was found to have a strong negative linear relationship with the number of internet. The findings which were subjected to descriptive and inferential analysis concluded that the key factors that determine internet access penetration in Kenya includes income levels, affordability, mobile subscriptions and efficient competition arising from effective regulations. A regression model with a high predictive capability was also developed which suggests that 95% of internet access penetration can be explained by income levels and mobile subscriptions.

Board effectiveness in non-governmental organizations in Kenya and the board's influence on NGO performance

Author: Mwaura, Irene Njeri

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Nonprofit organizations ; Nongovernmental organizations ; Management ; Boards of directors ;

Abstract:

This study examines the perception of management teams of the effectiveness of boards of directors within nongovernmental organizations and the extent to which performance is affected by challenges in the operational environment.Data was obtained through responses to a standardized questionnaire. A response rate of 54% was achieved. Managers rated the performance of the governing boards on six performance dimensions: contextual, educational, interpersonal, analytical, political and strategic. Boards were rated lowest in the strategic dimension, which assessed the extent of their strategic input into the directions of the organizations, and analytical dimension, which measured the boards??? ability to deal with complex matters and maintain a broad perspective. The highest rating was given to the educational dimension, which measured the boards' commitment to training and developing its members, and interpersonal dimension, which measured the extent to which the board nurtured group goals and relationships. The research findings also indicated that a significant negative correlation exists between board performance and constraints in the operational environment. Based on the research findings, it recommended that boards of NGOs consider adopting a model for self-assessment on a regular basis and that this be made available to the NGO boards and NGO council as well as to other NGOs and the public at large. It was also recommended that boards and senior management of NGOs perform regular environmental scans so that the organization can have time to realign strategy with existing challenges and limitations

An Investigation into the use of cooking gas by public boarding secondary schools in Nairobi, Kenya

Author: Muchiri, Elizabeth Wakarura

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Liquidified petroleum gas ; Secondary schools ; Nairobi, Kenya ; Boarding schools ;

Abstract:

The objective of this research is to investigate the use of LPG in Kenyan public institutions, following the government campaign to encourage its use. In particular, the research seeks to understand the usage of cooking gas by public boarding secondary schools in Nairobi. The government has been promoting the use of LPG as a clean fuel and to curb deforestation.The research covers the public boarding secondary schools in Nairobi city and the environs. It involves establishing the perceptions that lead to the choice of fuels, knowledge of properties of properties of preferred fuels and seeks to determine interventions that can encourage use of gas.The survey was done by the use of a questionnaire filled in by an interviewer. The researcher sought to understand perceptions that motivate, hinder or moderate the behavior of school administrators in choosing the fuels. The data was then analyzed and results summarized.The results indicate that most schools use wood fuel, though they would consider using cooking gas. It is also clear that the school managers value the aspects that make cooking gas better fuel, even though they still do not use it. The major concern for not using gas is the perceived expense, though there is some concern on safety. Knowledge on how to get a gas facility installed is also limited. There is awareness about the government policy encouraging the use of gas for cooking, though the policy has not been directed to the schools. The policy makers and drivers should direct their policies to institutions and communities and not merely the individual households.

An exploratory study on the adoption of innovations at the bottom of the pyramid : a focus on early adopters based on a case study on Senator

Author: Iwiya, Jaquiline Nyambura

Awarding University: Strathmore University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: Strathmore University Library ;

Subject Terms: Consumer behavior/East African Breweries Limited/Beer/Consumption/Marketing/ ;

Abstract:

This exploratory study examined the characteristics of early adopters at the Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP) market segment, their motivations and their use of information sources, especially media channels. The key themes that guided the research were consumer behaviour, the marketing concepts of market segmentation and diffusion of innovations, from which the conceptual framework was developed. The research was based on a case study of East African Breweries Ltd following the launch of its Senator brand in the BOP market. Secondary data was used to develop and establish the findings in this research. The results of this research suggest that early adopters at the BOP market segment are generally young, with higher income levels than their peers thus facilitating the early adoption of innovations. As they undertake employment activities, early adopters get exposed to Top of Pyramid (TOP) lifestyles which creates a disconnect between their working and living environment. An attempt to reduce the dissonance sees these early adopters adopting branded innovative products while seeking to emulate TOP lifestyles as seen in their preference for media channels that target middle to upper class consumers. In trying to bridge the gap between themselves and TOP consumers, their social status is enhanced and they stand out from their peers. This enhances further their role of opinion leadership as other consumers come to them for clarification or guidance on key issues. The implication of this research is that following from the development of a profile of early adopters at the BOP segment, marketers can now focus their activities on them to enhance the adoption of innovations. Additionally, marketers should consider using TOP media channels when advertising BOP products as opposed to assuming that all low-income consumers prefer regional/local media channels. Finally, marketers need to develop creative ways of stimulating BOP opinion leadership by use of campaigns that arouse curiosity of the audience thus generating product discussions. This in turn promotes word of mouth discussions and enhances product awareness.