1072 Records out of 22207 Records

Ethnopharmacology and toxicology of antimalarial plants used traditionally in Msambweni, Kenya

Author: Nguta, Joseph Mwanzia

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ; University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Msambweni, Kenya ; Medicinal plants ; Antimalarials ; Mijikenya (African people) ; Artemia salina ; Malaria ; Pharmacology ;

Abstract:

Historically, compounds containing novel structure from natural origin represent a major alternative source for the discovery and development of new drugs for several diseases. This study was undertaken in order to compose detailed documentation on wild medicinal flora used against malaria, existing knowledge, attitudes and practices related to malaria recognition, control and treatment; ethnodiagnostic skill used by the Msambweni community as a lead to traditional bioprospecting and to evaluate the toxicological activity of the crude extracts in brine shrimp bioassay using Artemia salina Leach (Artemiidae). Study I was conducted with herbalists (Traditional Medical Practitioners) to document medicinal plants that are traditionally used by the Msambweni community of Kenyan South Coast to treat malaria, where the disease is endemic. Herbalists were interviewed by administration of semi structured questionnaires in order to obtain information on medicinal plants traditionally used for the treatment of malaria. Focused group discussions held with the herbalists supplemented the interview and questionnaire survey. Twenty six species of plants in twenty four genera distributed in 20 families were reported to be used in this region for the treatment of malaria. Labiatae, Rutaceae and Liliaceae families had each eleven percent of the plant species reported and represented the species that are most commonly used. Thirteen plant species, namely; Aloe desertt Berger (Liliaceae), Launea corn uta (Oliv and Hiem) C. Jeffrey (Compositae), Ocimum bactlicum L. (Labiatae), Teclea simplicifolia (Eng) Verdoon (Rutaceae), Gerranthus lobatus (Cogn.) Jeffrey (Cucurbitaceae), Grewia hexaminta Burret. (Tiliaceae), Canthium glaucum Hiern. (Rubiaceae), Amaranthus hybridus L. (Amaranthaceae), Combretum padoides Engl and Diels. (Combretaceae), Senecio syringitolius O. Hoffman. (Compositae), Ocimum suave Willd (Labiatae), Aloe macrosiphon Bak. (Liliaceae) and Laudolphia buchananii (Hal1.t) Stapf. (Apocynaceae) are documented from this region for the first time for the treatment of malaria. Study II was conducted with community members to document herbal medicines used in the treatment of malaria as well as the existing knowledge, attitudes and practices related to malaria recognition, control and treatment in South Coast, Kenya. Data was collected using semi structured questionnaires and interviews. A focused group discussion held with the community members, one in each of the study villages supplemented the interview and questionnaire survey. The respondents were found to have a good understanding of malaria and could distinguish it from other disease conditions characterized by increased body temperature. They were also aware that malaria was spread by mosquitoes. Malaria prevalence was high, and affected individuals at an average of four times a year. Community members avoided mosquito bites by using mosquito nets, clearing bushes around their homesteads and burning plant parts to generate smoke. They prevented and treated malaria by taking decoctions or concoctions of traditional herbal remedies. Forty plant species in thirty five genera distributed in twenty four families were used as antimalarials in the study area. Five plant species, namely; Heeria insignis Del. (Anacardiaceae), Rottboelia exaltata L.F (Gramineae), Pentanisia ouranogyne S. Moore (Rubiaceae), Agathisanthenum globosum (A. Rich) Hiem (Rubiaceae), and Grewia trichocarpa Hochst ex A. Rich (Tiliaceae) are documented for the first time in South Coast, Kenya, for the treatment of malaria. Study III was conducted with community members to systematically document ethnophytotherapeutic remedies, ethnodiagnostic skills and related traditional knowledge utilized by the Digo community of the Kenyan Coast to diagnose malaria as a lead to traditional bioprospecting. The study was carried out in three Digo villages of Diani sub-location between May 2009 and December 2009. Data was collec

Effects of selected direct acting cholinergic drugs on pain behaviour in the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

Author: Dulu, Thomas Daido

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Pain ; Heterocephalus glaber ; Acetylcholine ;

Abstract:

Various endogenous substances are involved in the control of nociception both at the segmental and at the higher levels of central nervous system. These substances include acetylcholine, which modify pain processing in a wide variety of experimentally induced or clinically related pain states by interacting with specific receptors. Acetylcholine is the endogenous ligand for the cholinergic receptor system with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, and systemic or intrathecal stimulation of these receptors results in modulation of pain responses in animals and humans. In this study, the role of cholinergic system in nociception in the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) was evaluated. The study explored the antinociceptive effects of the muscarinic receptor agonist, oxotremorine (10, 20, 50 and 100 ug/kg body weight) and the nicotinic receptor agonist, epibatidine (0.5, 1,2 and 3 ug/kg body weight) using three commonly used nociceptive tests. These were the formalin (20f..LI, 10%), the hot plate (60?C) and the tail flick (56 ?C) tests. To elucidate possible interaction with opioidergic system, a general opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, was simultaneously administered with the cholinergic agonists. Muscarinic (atropine) and nicotinic (mecamylamine) blockers were used for antagonistic reactions. In the formalin test, the duration the animal took lickinglbiting the injected paw was scored in blocks of 5 minutes for a duration of 60 minutes, whereas in the hot plate test the latency (s) the animal took to react to the thermal pain was recorded. In the tail flick test, tailflick withdrawal latency (s) was scored. The selected high doses (20, 50 or 100 ug/kg) of oxotremorine induced a statistically significant (P<0.05) dose-dependent reduction in the mean time spent lickinglbiting the injected paw in both the first and second phases of the formalin test. In both early and late phases of formalin test, the effect of oxotremorine on the mean time spent lickinglbiting the injected paw was reversed by atropine. The animals treated with epibatidine (1, 2, or 3 ug/kg) showed a statistically significant (P<O.05) reduction in the mean time spent in lickinglbiting the injected paw in both early and late phases of the formalin test. When mecamylamine was administered together with epibatidine (2 jJg /kg), it significantly increased the mean time spent in lickinglbiting the injected paw in both phases of the formalin test. In the hot-plate test, oxotremorine (20, 30 or 50 ug /kg) and epibatidine (1, 2 or 3Jlglkg) caused a significantly different dose-dependant increase in the hotplate response latency. The effects of oxotremorine and epibatidine were blocked by atropine and mecamylamine, respectively. In the tail-flick test, oxotremorine (20, 30 or 50 ug Ikg) and epibatidine (1, 2 or 3Jlglkg) caused a significantly different dose-dependant increase in the tailflick response latency. In the same test, the effects of oxotremorine and epibatidine were blocked by atropine and mecamylamine, respectively. In all the three nociceptive tests, naloxone in combination with oxotremorine or epibatidine exhibited synergism of their effects. Administration of atropine, mecamylamine or naloxone alone did not show any significant effect on the nociceptive behaviour in any of the three tests. In conclusion, the study showed that oxotremorine and epibatidine are effective antinociceptive drugs in the naked mole-rat and that naloxone is able to potentiate their antinociceptive effects. The data further reveals that the cholinergic system is crucial in pain regulation in the naked mole-rat.

Cookability and nutritional properties of soaked, stored and roasted mucuna (mucuna pruriens) beans

Author: Wanjekeche, Elizabeth

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Mucuna pruriens/Nutrition/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Characteristics of production system, Epidemiology and control of pig parasites in Busia District, Kenya

Author: Kagira, John Maina

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ; University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Busia District/Hogs/Nematoda/Oesophagostomum/Antelaea azadirachta/Carica papaya ;

Abstract:

A study was carried out in Busia District to characterize the pig production system, determine the prevalence and intensity of pig parasites, identify the risk factors associated with occurrence of these parasites and determine the efficacy of pawpaw products and neem oil against Oesophagostomum spp and Haematopinus suis infections in pigs. In order to achieve these objectives, socio-economic studies, slaughter slab and farm surveys and efficacy trials were carried out. For the socio-economic survey, questionnaire data on farm characteristics was collected from 182 farmers selected from the six divisions of Busia District. The mean number of pigs per farm was 3.6, mainly (1781182, 98%) for income generation. The production systems were mainly farrow to weaner (221182, 12%) and weaner to finisher (651182, 36%). The main production constraints as perceived by farmers included pig diseases (1481182,81%) and high cost or lack of feed (1481182,81%). The slaughter slab survey involved a questionnaire survey on 16 butchers and 6 slaughter-slabs in the main urban centres in the District. The average net income per annum for each butcher was Ksh 62,688 (897 USD), while the average profit per slaughtered pig was Ksh. 268 (3.8 USD). The main constraints to butchery business were conflicts with regulatory authorities (16116,100%) and lack of slaughter pigs (15/16, 94%). The study on prevalence and intensity of parasites was carried out at both slaughter slabs (37 pigs) and farms (135 farms, 306 pigs) level in Busia District. The prevalences of nematodes shed by pigs at both the slaughter slab and farm level were:Oesophagostomum spp (100% (37/37), 75% (230/306)), Strongyloides ransomi (16% (6/37), 37% (113/306)), Ascaris suum (19% (7/37), 18% (55/306)), Trichuris suis (3% (1137), 7% (211306)), Metastrongylus spp (54% (20/37), 11% (34/306)) and Physocephalus sexalatus (24% (9/37), 3% (9/306)). The gastrointestinal protozoan parasites in both the slaughtered and farm sampled pigs respectively included: coccidia spp (85% (32/37), 33% (1011306)), Balantidium coli (89% (33/37), 64% (196/306)), Tritrichomonas suis (89% (33/37), 42% (129/306)) and Entamoeba spp (100% (37/37), 87% (266/306)). The ectoparasites observed on slaughtered and farm pigs respectively were Sarcoptes scabiei (63% (21133), 64 (195/306)), Haematopinus suis (85% (28/33), 96% (294/306)), Ixodid ticks (40% (13/33), 30% (92/306)). The prevalence of cysticercosis was 4% (111284). There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between the amount of rainfall in a given Division of sampling and prevalence of all the nematodes except S ransomi. The prevalence of nematodes was associated with age, being highest in adults (Oesophagostomum spp), growers and finishers (A. suum, T suis) and piglets (S ransomi and P. sexalatus, Metastrongylus spp). There was negative correlation between the amount of rainfall in the Division of pig origin and prevalence of coccidia, Tritrichomonas suis, and Entamoeba spp, but a positive correlation with prevalence of B. coli. The prevalence of H suis was significantly (p<0.05) associated with amount of rainfall (negative correlation), class of pigs (highest in finishers) and lack of provision of housing. The prevalence of mange was negatively associated with amount of rainfall (negative correlation) and class (highest in sows) of pigs. Lack of latrines was the only significant (p<0.05) factor associated with the prevalence of porcine cysticercosis. The efficacy trials evaluated the effectiveness of pawpaw and neem products on Oesophagostomum spp and H suis infections in pigs using in vitro and in vivo tests. Papain and papaya latex were the most effective herbal products against Oesophagostomum spp. In the in vivo tests, levamisole, pawpaw latex, neem, papain, pawpaw powder caused faecal egg count reductions of 84.6%, 57.1%, 56%,43.2%,27.1%, respectively. At in vitro level, neem oil caused 100% mortalities in concentrations above 12.5% while amitraz at

Expression of trypanotolerant quantitative trait loci in a boran-based backcross under natural Tsetse challenge

Author: Orenge, Caleb Oburu

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Tsetse flies ; Boran cattle ; Trypanosomiasis ; Trypanosoma congolense ; N'Dama cattle ; Genetics ;

Abstract:

African animal trypanosomosis (AA T) or Nagana is a transboundary disease with immense negative impact in Agricultural development across 37 African countries, with 60M livestock at risk. Utilization of trypanotolerant breeds as a form of control may offer a viable and sustainable option following recent identification of nine trypanotolerant quantitative trait loci (QTL) with positive effects in an F2 cattle population of N'Dama/ Kenyan Boran, under a challenge of 1180 clone of 'Lcongolence. The current study was to confirm whether these identified QTLs would be expressed under natural tsetse and trypanosomosis challenge. To achieve this, a QTL challenge and mapping experiment was designed involving 192 backcross of (N'Dama x Kenyan-Boran) x .Kenyan-Boran, BCl, 13 FI (N'Dama x Kenyan-Boran) sires and 8 founders of 4 KenyanBoran females and 4 N'Dama males. All animals were screened using 35 polymorphic microsatellite markers spanning through BTA2, BTA4, BTA7, BTA16 and BTA17 target chromosomes. Thirty seven F1s and 23 Kenyan-Boran were used as controls-for the field challenge. All cattle types were exposed to natural tsetse and trypanosomosis challenge in Narok district, Kenya and monitored for one year against 46 defined traits. Intra-genetic-types (F I, BCl, and K-Boran) means and standard deviations of the defined traits were computed and used as a measure oftolerance index for comparison. Overall mean number of N'Dama alleles CONAS) and specific N'Dama allele score components, inherited by the BCl from tht 'N'Dama grands ire through the heterozygous F 1 sire were computed. Based on this ONAS score, BCI were divided into 30% upper and lower N'Dama alleles inherited and individual traits in each group were ranked in terms of trypanotolerance. In QTL analysis, a single trait QTL model, within the framework of multiple interval mapping (MIM) of MultiQTL software was implemented with 46 trait scores and 35 micro satellite markers span over the five target chromosomes. Results revealed FJ as the most trypanotolerant, K-Boran the most susceptible with BCI intermediate but more towards the K-Boran, an indication of some recessives. The upper 30% N'Dama allele group was more trypanotolerant at individual and overall trypanotolerance trait levels than the lower N'Dama allele group. Despite the expected increased error variance for measurement of traits under field conditions, QTLs were detected in all five chromosomes at false discovery rate of 15%, deriving positive alleles from N'Dama breed. It is concluded that QTLs detected under controlled experiment are expressed under field conditions thus setting a stage for practical application of the results through marker assisted selection and marker assisted introgression programmes. This will benefit farmers in tsetse endemic areas by enhancing disease resistance of the K - Boran susceptible breed while retaining its desired productivity characteristics.

Evaluation of border crops and varietal resistance for the management of diamondback moth (plutella xylostella L.) on Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.capitata)

Author: Hasheela, Eddie Birnie

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Brassica oleracea/Cabbage/Plutella xylostella/Pest control/Plutella xylostella/ ;

Abstract:

Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) is one of the most important vegetables grown in Kenya for home consumption and as an important source of income to many small-scale farmers. The production of cabbage is, however, constrained by several pests. Among those pests, Diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) is ranked as the most important pest and is regarded as the most destructive insect pest of cruciferous crops worldwide. As an attempt to overcome the problem, field experiments were conducted at the University of Nairobi, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences farm in 2008 and 2009. The study was carried out to screen six cabbage varieties for resistance and evaluate the effects of border crops on Diamondback moth infestation and damage on cabbage. Six cabbage varieties which were screened were: Drumhead, Sugarloaf, Golden Acre, Gloria Fl, Copenhagen Market and Pruktor Fl. The experiment was set up in a split plot design consisting of four replicates per treatment whereby one set of the treatments were sprayed with Dimethoate and the others were not sprayed. The cabbage varieties were compared in Diamondback moth damage and infestation. In border crops experiment, crops evaluated were Indian mustard, Radish, Kale, Tomato, Coriander and Cleome. They were planted around cabbage Copenhagen Market variety in the field 15 days prior to cabbage transplanting. The experiment was laid out using a Randomised Complete Block Design (RCBD) consisting of four replicates. In both experiments, five randomly selected plants per plot were used to record the numbers of larvae, pupae and damage scores. The yield in terms of quality and quantity of cabbage heads per variety were assessed on all the plants per plot at maturity stage. It was evident from the study that there were significant differences (P<0.05) among the sprayed and unsprayed varieties on infestation by the immature DBM. Among the sprayed and unsprayed treatments, Copenhagen Market and Pruktor F 1 had the lowest mean number of the immature Diamondback moth. The unsprayed varieties recorded higher DBM damage compared with the sprayed varieties. The lowest damage was recorded on cabbage var. Pruktor FI and Sugarloaf both in sprayed and unsprayed treatments. Among the unsprayed varieties, cabbage var. Pruktor Fl and Copenhagen Market had the highest number of the marketable cabbage heads. However, the highest cabbage head weights were recorded from Pruktor F I in the sprayed as well as in the unsprayed treatments. The study on border crops indicated that the mean number of immature Diamondback moth was significantly lower (P<O.05) on cabbages surrounded by the Indian mustard and Coriander border crops compared with those surrounded by the other crops. The results also indicated that cabbage plots bordered with the Indian mustard had the lowest number of damaged cabbage heads. Plots surrounded with Indian mustard and Coriander borcW~ crops produced highest marketable cabbage heads and highest cabbage head weights. The results obtained in these studies reveal that cabbage var. Pruktor FI and Copenhagen market and Irtdi~mustard border crop can be adopted by farmers for the management of Diamondback moth on cabbage.

Influence of supplementary irrigation and organic manure application on micronutrient density and yield of five common bean varieties

Author: Itwari, Anna Felix

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Beans/Irrigation/Manures/Kabete, Kenya/Mwea, Kenya/Soil fertility/Iron/Zinc/ ;

Abstract:

Micronutrients deficiency especially (Zinc and Iron) have been identitied as limiting in most diets of people who depend on staple foods. Bean varieties high in Iron and Zinc have been developed in East and Central Africa to combat micronutrient deficiency. However, the benefits from these varieties depend on the environment where they are grown. Agronomic practices have been known to influence micronutrient concentration in beans. However, little work has been done to develop management practices that will enhance expression of the high mineral density trait. Field experiments were conducted during 2006 short rain and 2007 long rain seasons to determine the effect of supplementary irrigation and organic manure application on micronutrient density of five bean varieties grown in Kabete and Mwea. The experiments were laid out in a split-split plot design with irrigation as the main plot factor, organic manure application as subplot and bean varieties as sub-sub plot factor. The treatments were replicated three times. The irrigation treatments were: rain-fed and supplementary irrigation. The organic manure treatments were control (0 t/ha), cattle manure (10 t/ha) and chicken manure (l0 t/ha). Micronutrient (iron and zinc) dense bean varieties tested in the study were: Gofta, AND 620, Maharagi Soja, Nakaja and MLB 49/89A. Supplementary irrigation was provided by overhead sprinkler in Kabete and by flooding using furrows in Mwea three hours daily three times a week. Data collected included time to emergence, plant height, and time to 50% flowering, time to 50% podding, bean stem maggot severity, number of nodules per plant, pods per plant, seeds per pods, grain yield, and iron and zinc content in leaves and seeds. Days to 50% flowering, 50% pod formation were longer in Kabete than in. Mwea sites. Generally, higher yields were obtained under chicken manure treated plots than under cattle and control plots. Bean stem maggot severity was higher under chicken manure than under cattle and control. Under irrigated conditions, severity was lower by 18% than under rain fed conditions. Supplementary irrigation and organic manures improved number of nodules per plant, pods per plant and seeds per pod. On average, higher yields (39%) were recorded under irrigation than under rain fed conditions. Supplementary irrigation increased plant height, number of nodules per plant, grain yield and leaf iron content of bean plants. However, seed iron content and zinc content in both leaves and seeds were not influenced by irrigation. Organic manures increased number of days to flowering xii and number of days to podding in some varieties. Chicken manure increased severity of bean stem maggot (8SM) in the short rains while cattle manure had no effect. Chicken and cattle manure increased grain yield and yield components in most varieties. Chicken manure however increased grain yield in more varieties than cattle manure. Ranking of varieties based on leaf iron content. from the highest to the lowest. was AND 620 347.7 ppm, MLB 49/89A 339.1 ppm, Maharagi Soja 319.4 ppm, Nakaja 322.6 ppm and Gofta 245.4.9 ppm. Variety MLB 49/89A had the highest seed iron content 78.13 ppm while all other varieties did not vary much in both leaf and seed zinc contents. Bean plants grown in Mwea site had higher leaf iron content (364.8.ppm) than bean plants grown in Kabete site (282.7 ppm) while the converse was the case with respect to leaf and seed zinc content. More iron was accumulated in leaves during the short rains (342.6 mean ppm) than during long rains (304.9 mean ppm) while more zinc was accumulated in leaves in the long rains than in the short rains. In conclusion, iron content of bean plants can be improved by supplementary irrigation. AND 620 variety had the highest iron in leaves and also the highest grain yield and therefore a suitable candidate for dual-purpose use (leaf and seed utilization). Leaf iron content of beans is intluenced by location and soil

Efficiency of cattle marketing in Kajiado District, Kenya

Author: Juma, Mutungei Mohammed

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Marketing/Cattle/Kajiado District/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Factors associated with overweight and obesity among school children aged 11 to 14 years in Nairobi, Kenya

Author: Githinji, Millicent

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Children and youth ; Obesity ; Nairobi ; Socioeconomic factors ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Management of foliar diseases (Peronospora destructor and Alternaria porri) and onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) in different varieties of onions (Allium cepa L.) by vegetable intercropping

Author: Gachu, Sarah Muthoni

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Allium cepa ; Peronospora destructor ; Altineria porri ; Thrips ; Thrips tabaci ;

Abstract:

Bulb onion (Allium cepa) is one of the most important vegetable crops in the world and is susceptible to many foliar diseases and pests that reduce yields. Field experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of intercropping in the management of downy mildew (Peronospora destructor), purple blotch (Alternaria porri). and onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) in onion. The selected crops were carrot (Daucus carota), spiderplant (Cleome gynandra) and french beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). These were intercropped with three onion varieties namely Bombay Red, Red Creole and Orient Fl in 2 x 4.5m plots in a completely randomized block design laid down as a split plot and replicated four times. Data was collected in terms of population and damage by thrips. Thrips population was determined as the number of thrips per plant, damage incidence as a percentage of damaged number of plants and damage severity on a scale of 1-5. Other data collected included downy mildew and purple blotch incidence, severity on a scale of 1-9 and 1-8, respectively, yield of vegetable intercrops and bulb yield. The efficacy of vegetable intercrops in controlling downy mildew, purple blotch and thrips was compared with a fungicide (Metalaxyl 80glkg + Mancozeb 640glkg) and an insecticide (Imidacloprid), respectively. Intercropping onion with the three vegetables and application of fungicide reduced the severity of downy mildew and purple blotch. Among the intercrops, spider plant was observed to have the greatest effect on downy mildew and purple blotch severity with a reduction of up to 11.48% and 15.25% respectively. Spiderplant and carrot significantly reduced thrips population while french beans had no significant effect on the population. Among the treatments, spider plant had the greatest effect on thrips population with a reduction of up to 45.16%. It was also observed that among the three onion varieties, Red Creole had the lowest downy mildew and purple blotch severity while Bombay red had the lowest thrips damage severity. Intercropping onion with carrot and spiderplant significantly reduced onion yield but the reduction by french beans was not significant. French beans and spiderplant did not significantly reduce gross income per hectare but on average fungicidal and insecticidal treatment had the highest total gross income per hectare compared to the vegetables. This study showed that intercropping onion with spiderplant, carrot and french beans suppressed downy mildew and purple blotch severity while intercropping onion with . spiderplant and carrot also reduced thrips population and damage. Spiderplant and carrot significantly reduced onion yield compared to french bean and chemical control. However total gross income per hectare from french bean and spider plant was not significantly lower compared to chemical control. Therefore french bean and spiderplant were found to be a suitable intercrop of onion since their effect on gross income was not significant. Since spiderplant and carrot reduced onion diseases and thrips, they can be utilized in their management but further investigations should be carried out on the optimal spatial arrangement in intercropping conditions in order to reduce their effect on onion yield.