12 Records out of 22207 Records

The role of the radio in peace building : a case study of the KBC radio service among the Rendille, Borana, Burji and Gabra communities in Marsabit County

Author: Lechet, Lino Timado

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Rendille (African people) ; Boran (African people) ; Burji (African people) ; Gabra (African people) ; Marsabit County ; Radio broadcasting ; Conflict resolution ; Peace ;

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the radio in peace building. It was a case study of the KBC radio service among the Rendille, Borana, Burji and Gabra communities in Marsabit County. The study has found that, the KBC sub-service stations are all rated lowly in terms of attention and coverage of conflict reporting and mobilization for peace. This was assessed in the parameters of frequency of capture of stories related to peace and conflict as well as the air time given to such stories and the number of times such a particular story that find itself in focus is repeated to stress it. From the respondents' responses, it is clear that not much attention is given to coverage of conflict and peace efforts in Marsabit County. It is my hope that as time goes by; restrictive policy framework of KBC will be relaxed to allow the sub-service stations more space in terms of determination of news, coverage and time on air. This may lead them to develop more relevant content for the local vernacular speakers.

A critical exploration of mission practices of selected Kenyan churches among the unreached peoples of Northern Kenya between 1960 and 2008 : a case study of ACK, AIC, CITAM and KAG ministries in Marsabit

Author: Muchilwa, Bernard Amianda

Awarding University: Africa International University, Kenya

Level : MTh

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: Africa International University Library ;

Subject Terms: Religious organizations ; Evangelism ; Traditions ; Marsabit District ; Anglican Church of Kenya ; Africa Inland Church, Kenya ; Christ is the Answer Ministries (CITAM) ; Kenya Assemblies of God ; Gabra (African people) ; Rendille (African people) ; Boran (African people) ; So ;

Abstract:

With statistics indicating that Northern Kenya is the least reached area of Kenya with the gospel, there is a need to know how Kenyan churches are responding to the challenge. This study sought to critically explore the mission practices of selected Kenyan churches among the unreached peoples of Northern Kenya, Marsabit District, in the period 1960 - 2008. The researcher investigated Anglican Church of Kenya (ACK), Africa Inland Church (AIC), Christ is the Answer Ministries (CITAM), and Kenya Assemblies of God (KAG) ministries. The selected churches' mission theories, activities, and their contextual relevance among the Gabra, Rendile, Borana, and Somali ethnic groups were explored. The researcher used qualitative approach in collecting data with much leaning on ethnographic interviewing and limited participant observation. The sample had forty two informants who were drawn from field missionaries, mission leaders, mission trainers, leaders of mission agencies in Northern Kenya, and indigenous people who represent the communities the churches are serving. The study found that these churches use conventional evangelistic and holistic methods with little contextualization. Practices like 'storying', veterinary camps, and 'performance of miracles' have great impact. Traditional culture, especially the sorio sacrificial system, is strongly embedded in the communities and is a key to reaching these communities. There are numerous infrastructural, security, economic, environmental, cultural, and religious challenges to missions in Northern Kenya. For missions to succeed in this region stake holders must take note of these challenges and equip missionaries and natives to plant contextually relevant churches.

Characterisation of sheep and goat genetic resources in their production system context in Northern Kenya

Author: Warui, Harun Mwai

Awarding University: University of Hohenheim, Germany

Level : PhD

Year: 2008

Holding Libraries: International Livestock Research Institute Library ; Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Sheep/Goats/Pastoralists/Marsabit District/Gabra (African people)/Rendille (African people)/Social change/Rangelands/Northern Kenya/Arid and semi-arid regions/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Major factors associated with high morbidity, mortality and poor perfomance of camel calves, kids and lambs in the Rendille and Samburu pastoral herds in Marsabit district, Kenya

Author: Njanja, James Chomba

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Rendille (African people) ; Samburu (African people) ; Camelus dromedarius ; Marsabit District ; Cattle ; Sheep ; Goats ; Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia ; Disease ; Trypanosomosis ; Pastoral systems ; Epidemiology ;

Abstract:

This thesis describes a study on the major factors associated with morbidity, mortality and performance of camel calves, kids and lambs in Rendille and Samburu pastoral herds in Marsabit district, Kenya. The main objective of the study was to identify and assess the major factors in order to formulate guidelines for appropriate disease control strategies for improved performance. The study was conducted in three phases for a period of 27 months from March 2000 to May 2002. The first phase was to assess pastoral perceptions on the livestock production systems in the study area. A pastoralists' appraisal was conducted through rapid rural appraisal (RRA) by community meetings in six sub locations namely Olturot, Ilaut, and Ngurunit in the arid agroecological zone (AEZ) V and in Kargi, Korr and Loglogo in the very arid AEZ VI from 20th March to May 2000. The meetings were held in six settlements know by the same names. These were purposively selected, as they were the only physical foci easily accessible and representing the six administrative sublocations. In all the sub locations, the major livestock reared were indigenous camels, cattle, sheep and goats. The camels reared were described as Rendille/Gabra; cattle as the Zebus; goats as the East African breed and sheep as Blackhead. The pastoralists reported that some exotic breeds of camels, cattle and goats had been introduced in the area and that a few households had also accepted chicken and bees. Donkeys and dogs were also important domestic animals among the pastoralists. Twenty-six household and six commercial needs were listed as fulfilled by the animals kept. Milk for household use from camels, cattle, goats and sheep was ranked as the most important utilization of livestock. The participants listed 15, 13, and 10 diseases and casual organisms affecting camel calves, kids and lambs respectively. In camel calves, ticks were ranked first followed by, diarrhoea, gulor (navel ill) and wounds in all areas. Lice and fleas followed by diarrhoea, worms, foot rot and ndis (yellow liver) were listed in kids and lambs in all areas while Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), orf, konkoro (central nervous disorder), lkang (rabies like disease) were listed as common in kids. In all locations the pastoralists indicated that they would improve livestock by increased traditional mobility and quarantines, cleaning of bomas and wells, avoiding known poisonous plants and parasite-infested areas and also by use of veterinary medicine and disease control regimes. The second phase was a cross-sectional study to estimate. the prevalence of morbidity and mortality in camel calves, kids and lambs. It was conducted between November 2000 and January 2001 among 60 households, 10 from each of the six sublocations randomly selected from a list frame. A descriptive analysis on disease epidemiology was carried out and prevalence of morbidity and mortality rates estimated. Significant similarities and differences in the prevalence were generated and association between them and AEZs, previous treatments, sex and sublocations determined using the generalized linear models (GLM). The results showed that mean morbidity prevalences were 36.8%, 33.0% and 39.9 % in camel calves, kids and lambs, respectively. Sublocations were associated with mean morbidity prevalence in the three species of livestock (p<0.05). There was an interaction of sex and sub locations in Ngurunit where mean morbidity prevalence in female camel calves was higher than in males (p<0.05). Also, there was an interaction of sex and sub locations in lambs in Ngurunit and Olturot where the mean morbidity prevalence in female lambs was higher than that in males (p<0.05). The highest infection prevalences were; mange (10.2%) in camel calves; worms in kids (2.3%) and lambs (4.5%). The prevalences of coccidiosis based on laboratory diagnosis were; 2.2%, 23.2% and 28.9% in camel calves, kids and lambs, respectively. Infection prevalenc

Studies on preventive and curative ethnoveterinary remedies applied by the Rendile, Ariaal and Gabra communities of Marsabit District, Kenya.

Author: Wamwere-Njoroge, George J

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2004

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ; International Livestock Research Institute Library ; University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Livestock/Disease/Veterinary services/Flowers and plants/Rendille (African people)/Ariaal (African people)/Gabra (African people)/Marsabit District/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Sedentarization, seasonality, and economic differentiation.

Author: Fujita, Masako

Awarding University: University of Victoria, Canada

Level : MA

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Anthropology ; Nutrition ; Pastoralists ; Ariaal (African people) ; Rendille (African people) ; Northern Kenya ;

Abstract:

This thesis examines the impact of the recent transition from nomadic pastoralism to sedentism and concomitant economic differentiation upon seasonal patterns in maternal diet, morbidity, and anthropometry made by Ariaal and Rendille peoples in northern Kenya. Results reveal clear differences between the dietary patterns of nomadic and sedentary mothers. The reduction of dietary protein, the increase in dietary energy, and the alleviation of seasonal dietary stress affected sedentary mothers' body compositions such that their body fat and protein stores fluctuated in a distinct manner each from the other. Morbidity patterns of sedentary mothers reflected neither the dietary seasonality nor the seasonal patterns of rainfall, both of which were important determinants of nomadic mothers' health statuses. The results demonstrate the importance of longitudinal research design in studying and understanding the consequences of sedentarization.

Who gets to go to school? Parental schooling choices among the Ariaal Rendille of northern Kenya.

Author: Giles, Joyce Lynn

Awarding University: University of Victoria, Canada

Level : MA

Year: 2001

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Rendille (African people) ; Ethnology ; Parents and parenting ; Girls ; Education ; Karare ; Marsabit District ;

Abstract:

An enormous literature details the benefits of educating female children with respect to lowered fertility and infant/child mortality levels. Far less examined are patterns of parental decision-making with respect to selecting specific children for schooling. This thesis uses logistic regression methodology to delineate parental decision-making patterns concerning childhood education in the Ariaal Rendille community of Karare, Marsabit District, northern Kenya. Results reveal clear, predictable parental strategies reflecting specific household characteristics and larger cultural traditions.

From livestock to land : the effects of agricultural sedentarization on pastrol Rendille and Ariaal of Northern Kenya

Author: Smith, Kevin Christopher

Awarding University: Pennsylvania State University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1997

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ; National Council for Science and Technology Library ;

Subject Terms: Ethnology/Social change/Social conditions and trends/Rural development/Agriculture/Rendille (African people)/Ariaal (African people)/Pastoralists/Songa, Kenya/Anthropology ;

Abstract:

This project investigates how the transition from nomadic pastoralism to settled agriculture affects work roles, control over resources, and what effects this transition has on Rendille and Ariaal men and women in an agropastoral community. Ultimately, this project is concerned with the resilience ofRendille and Ariaal identity and social organization, particularly how their age-systems and authority structure are affected by agricultural sedentism and market integration. In addition, this project investigates the economic and social ties to pastoral Rendille. Studying this change is important for understanding what appears to be an inevitable trend for many pastoral peoples: settlement, greater participation in the market economy, and changing roles and control over resources for men and women. Two major processes affect the economy of the community of Songa: agricultural sedentism and greater access to the market. Both have profound effects on work roles and control over resources. These effects, in tum, influence the decision making power of elders, women, and warriors. This dissertation research investigates these processes by examining household decision-making and budgets, time allocation of labor, and adherence to traditional institutions in the community ofSonga. The situation at Songa is compared to baseline information on pastoral Rendille and Ariaal previously to reveal social and cultural changes.

The organization of labor and production among the Ariaal Rendille, nomadic pastoralists of northern Kenya.

Author: Fratkin, Elliot Mayer

Awarding University: Catholic University of America, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1987

Holding Libraries: Catholic University of Eastern Africa Library ; University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Rendille (African people) ; Ethnology ; Pastoralists ; Ariaal Rendille USE Rendille (African people) ;

Abstract:

This dissertation examines the social organization of labor and domestic production in one community of Ariaal Rendille, nomadic pastoralists of northern Kenya. The purpose of this study was to analyze how labor is organized within and between cooperative households; whether there exists exploitation of labor in a kinship- based economy; and how domestic production is affected by forces of economic development including interaction with the market economy and agencies distributing famine- relief foods. Results of the research show that the Ariaal have a flexible internal division of labor enabling them to respond to environmental and social crises including drought, warfare, and modernization. This flexibility is achieved by separating the three types of domestic livestock--camels, cattle, and small stock of goats and sheep--into mobile camps herded away from the larger domestic settlements and managed by adolescents and members of the warrior age-set. However, results of time- allocation surveys show that those households with a higher producer/consumer ratio, greater wealth in livestock, and specializing in large stock production of camels and cattle have higher productivity, less labor intensity, and greater recovery from crisis than those households with a small producer/consumer ratio, poor in livestock wealth, and who concentrate on small stock production of goats and sheep. The dissertation concludes that kinship relations determine much of how the Ariaal organize production, despite recent changes brought about by the market economy and famine-relief efforts. Differences in wealth and household composition are compensated by generalized redistribution and the exchange of labor for livestock. Married male elders are privileged however in that they expend the least time in production tasks, while married women and adolescents expend the most time in labor activities. Finally it is noted that the Ariaal subsistence economy is threatened by the trend to settle around permanent missions distributing famine-relief, which removes the subsistence basis of livestock from the human population. Recommendations are made in the concluding chapter to improve livestock production in this context, particular by developing veterinary programs while keeping the range open for nomadic grazing of livestock.

The trophic relations and habitat adaptability of livestock in the central part of Rendille land in Kenya

Author: Migongo, Wangoi Elizabeth

Awarding University: Colorado State University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1984

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Range management ; Pastoralists ; Rendille (African people) ; Grazing ; Livestock ;

Abstract:

Most of northern Kenya is destined to remain rangeland due to the low and unpredictable rainfall. Camels (Camelus dromedarius), goats (Capra hircus), sheep (Ovis aries) and cattle (Bos indicus) are grazed on these rangelands. Studies were conducted to determine the abundance, quality, botanical composition and digestibility of the diets of these herbivores. Abundance of forage was determined through measurement of cover, frequency and biomass of species. Levels of crude protein were used as a measure of the quality of the selected forage species. The seasonal botanical composition was determined by the application of the microhistological technique on fecal sample composites for each season. Rumen fistulated castrates were used for determination of the dry matter and crude protein digestibility of major range forage species. The diets of camels contained the most browse. The diets of goats, sheep and cattle contained decreasing amounts of browse. The opposite was true for the grass and herb component of the diets. While most trees and shrubs dropped their leaves during the dry season, these leaves were still available to livestock species. Diet selection of the four herbivores was influenced by forage abundance during the wettest season of the study. This influence was least significant for cattle. Forage crude protein played a minimal or no role in diet selection. It appears that the abundance of useable forage, rather than the total plant or crown available, is the major factor influencing diet selection by these herbivores. Overall, for dry matter digestive power of major range plants, the camel was inferior to the other animal species. For trees, shrubs and dwarf shrubs, digestibility values were about equal among the herbivores. Grasses showed the greatest variations among herbivore species. Significant differences in crude protein digestibility were observed among animal species. These should be treated with caution since, due to the contamination of the digested samples with microbial protein, the observed differences may not be real. Since cattle diet consists mostly of grass, the least of the three vegetation components in both abundance and quality, and due to their frequent water requirements in an environment where rainfall is unpredictable and scarce, they are the least adapted, of the species studied, to these rangelands.