13 Records out of 22207 Records

Groundwater management for sugarcane establishment in Mumias Sugar Company, Kenya.

Author: Ogola, William Otieno

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2006

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Water ; Groundwater ; Sugarcane ; Mumias, Kenya ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The impact of socio-economic characteristics of workforce on productivity : a case study of contracted Mumias sugar outgrowers, Western Kenya

Author: Wafula, Justus Otiato

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2004

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Labour force/Social classes/Workforce/Sugarcane/Farmers/Mumias, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

The major objective of the study was to examine the impact of socioeconomic characteristics of workforce on productivity among the contracted outgrowers of Mumias Sugar Scheme, western Kenya. Data were collected from Mumias Sugar contracted outgrowers and their workforce based on sample of 30 contracted outgrowers farmers and 90 workers. Sampling was guided by stratified and systematic sampling, while data collection used a survey in which structurerd questionnaires were major data collection tools. Descriptive statistics were used to obtain frequencies, percentages and averages. Inferential statistics including chi-square were used to estimate the differences between groups and the extent to which the observations were significant and can be generalized to the population. Multiple regressions were used to identify impact of the various factors on productivity and other dependent variables. The findings of the study showed that farmers' age(s), education and work contract are the key socio-economic characteristics that account for productivity in the scheme. More important to the study was the impact of the socio-economic characteristics of the workforce on production and which the findings indicate that workers age(s) and education significantly influence production.

The food security status and nutrient response of traditional and exotic vegetables in Mumias sugarcane scheme.

Author: Omuolo, F M

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Food ; Vegetables ; Nutrition ; Sugarcane ; Mumias, Kenya ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The influence of modernization on the morality of the Muslim youth in Mumias town

Author: Ahaya, Lukes Ochieng

Awarding University: Moi University, Kenya

Level : MPhil

Year: 2001

Holding Libraries: Moi University Margaret Thatcher Library ;

Subject Terms: Muslims ; Young adults ; Youth USE Young adults ; Mumias, Kenya ; Modernization ; Morality ;

Abstract:

Modernization - a process that involves changes that occur as societies move from traditional to large scale, urban complex character, has made it very difficult for traditional religious concepts and practices to be observed in full. The purpose of this study was to find out the extent of the influence of this phenomenon on the morality of the Muslim youth living in Mumias town. The study had the following concerns: a) To investigate the phenomenon of modernization and its effect on the morals of young Muslims. b) To find out how the Muslim youth perceived and practised the Islamic teachings on morality. This study dealt with the young Muslims in Mumias town. Direct observation, questionnaires, interview schedules, and tape recording were used as far as was possible to determine the relationship between the Muslim youth morality and modernisation. Both qualitative and quantitative data analysis techniques were used. The major finding of this study was that modernisation had affected the morals of young Muslims. This effect was to the extent that they could not match faith and action as is required by Islam. The study showed that though in 'faith the institutionalisation of Islam by the youth was absent, in practice there was a differentiation of practice from belief. This study recommended that competent Islamic schools be established to offer both sacred and secular education to the youth. Effo11Smust also be made by the Muslim leadership to converse with other religious traditions with a view of making the best. of the co-existence. The success of these efforts however, will largely be dependent on the ability of the global Muslim community to establish an Islamic format to modernisation, a format that can compete favourably with the Western format that is currently dominant.

Incidence, severity and spread of cassava mosaic disease in Western Kenya.

Author: Lwole, Charles Lwanga

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2001

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Crop diseases ; Cassava mosaic virus ; Manihot esculenta ; Mumias, Kenya ; Butere, Kenya ; Kakamega, Kenya ; Busia, Kenya ; Teso, Kenya ; Siaya, Kenya ; Suba, Kenya ;

Abstract:

The impact and spread of cassava mosaic disease was studied through a survey, by harvesting of diseased and healthy plants in farmer's fields to determine current yields and the effects of cassava mosaic disease spread experiments, yield of spread experiments, determination of virus type by polymerase chain reaction and determination of cassava mosaic disease incidence in ratoons of cassava variety SS-4. The survey of incidence and severity of cassava mosaic disease and whitefly populations was carried out in October to November 1999 in Mumias/Butere, Kakamega, Busia and Teso in Western Province and Siaya and Suba in Nyanza Province. Many varieties of cassava were encountered, indicating a rich genetic diversity. Individual districts showed high cassava mosaic disease incidence and the overall cassava mosaic disease severity for all varieties was 3.33 (p0.01) on the 1-5 scale of increasing severity. Abundant whitefly populations associated with cassava mosaic disease were encountered in Suba District only, indicating that the spread of the pandemica is still active. The overall cassava mosaic disease incidence in the region had dropped to 62.3percent and was attributed to an infusion of improved cassava varieties by farmers of Busia and Teso district from Uganda. A survey of yield from farmer's fields revealed that fresh tuberous weight per plant ranged from 0.3 - 4.4 (+ 0.86) kg in local and improved varieties. Cassava mosaic disease accounted for 28% of the total fresh tuber yield variability in the districts, and cassava mosaic disease infections accounted for 53% poor harvests encountered in all the district, thus indicating that cassava mosaic disease reduces overall yield in Western Kenya. Disease spread experiments done in Bungoma, Kakamega and Siaya in 1999 revealed considerable spread between April and October 1999, at all sites. There was little spread at the Siaya site between, August 1999 and March 2000 and no spread at Kakamega site at the same period. Most period occurred at Siaya and it was significantly greater than at other sites. The local variety Serere used as a control showed severe infection towards the end of experiment of April 1999 plantings, whereas the improved varieties TMS 30337, TMS 30572 showed apparent decline in disease incidences towards the end of the experiment. Cassava mosaic disease incidences at Kakamega were higher than at Bungoma in plantings of April 1999. Mean cassava mosaic disease severity was not significantly different between Siaya (mean = 2.1, p = 0.05) and Kakamega (mean = 2.0, p = 0.05) but their severity was significantly different from that at Bungoma (mean = 1.6, p = 0.05). The variety SS-4 had only one plant infected at Kakamega in plantings of April 1999. Numbers of adult whiteflies differed significantly between sites, and between varieties in all experiments. Evaluation of yield from the four cassava varieties showed that the improved varieties yielded more than the local variety Serere. Combined yield for all varieties in all sites ranged from <0.1 - 5.0 (+1.0) kg per plant. The yield of improved varieties varied from the lowest 11.1 t/ha of SS-4 at Bungoma to 27.7 t/ha of SS-4 at Kakamega, the local variety Serere had a production of 11.24 t/ha at Bungoma to 18.43 t/ha at Kakamega. Adult whiteflies were not encountered on the plants at harvest 10 months after planting. Cassava mosaic disease was caused by the newly discovered Uganda Variant/East African cassava mosaic virus-Uganda Variant that predominated in the region. SS-4 was highly resistant to cassava mosaic disease and its ratoons showed low disease incidence whereas its cuttings showed no disease and can be used for propagation.

Intersectoral linkages in small holder farming systems : the case of contract sugarcane farming in the Mumias Sugarcane growing Zone, Western Kenya.

Author: Wangoli-Wanjawa, Edwin

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1999

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Mumias, Kenya/Sugarcane/Agricultural economics/Farming/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The evolution of Mumias settlement into an urban centre to circa 1940.

Author: Murunga, Godwin Rapando

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1998

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ; French Institute for Research in Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Wanga (African people) ; Ethnology ; Urban development ; Urbanization ; Colonialism ; Mumias, Kenya ;

Abstract:

This study examines the evolution of Mumias into an urban centre. It adopts and critiques the Weberian approach to urbanization and also re-asserts the underdevelopment perspective of unequal exchange and uneven development. In the framework of the underdevelopment theory, the place of merchant-capital in the development of Mumias is explained. The study demonstrates the relevance and/or lack of it of these theories in understanding the physical structure and social processes that characterised the evolution of Mumias from its earliest time to the year 1940. The study begins on the premise that there is no standard of determining an urban centre and that the Wanga had their own form of urbanism. The whole question of urbanization has to be re-examined and defined beyond Western definition straitjackets. The functionality of the Wanga urbanism is demonstrated in the importance of Itookho, the traditional name for the capital. The idea of Itookho is central in the urbanism of the Wanga. Its location, functions and changing character were a product of the centres response to the local needs and aspirations of the Wanga and their gerontocracy. The politico-administrative imperatives of the institution of Nabongo and the attendant socio-cultural and economic roles were pertinent aspects that defined Itookho. The place of the Maasai in the changing nature and functions of Itookho is also underscored in the study. By 1860, Itookho had evolved into a key aggregation of humans for socio-cultural purposes in its urban evolution. The study proceeds to examine the interlude between the traditional nature of Itookho and the exceedingly powerful presence of British colonialists. Attempts are made to illuminate the impact of the Arab-Swahili presence in Itookho including their commercial and religious lagecies. It is shown that the Arab Swahili reached Itookho, as a direct response to growing mercantile needs at the Coast. The Arab-Swahili mercantile incursions in Wanga in the era of Nabongo Shiundu made his Itookho re-named Kwa-Shiundu which became largely cosmopolitan. With such a cosmopolitan composition, the morphology of Kwa-Shiundu was gradually transformed. However, by 1894, when British colonial designs in Kenya became apparent, Islam had not effectively taken root in Kwa-Shiundu and the European presence and the Arab-Swahili lack of evangelical zeal accounted for the subsequent decline of the Arab-Swahili influence. The study analyses the impact of the Arab-Swahili merchant-capital on the Wanga and other parts of the Buluyia social formation. The establishment of the colonial state in Buluyia is given prominence in the study. It emphasizes the importance of grasping the colonial racial dichotomy in analysing and understanding the social processes evident in Mumias. Its colonial transformation was based on this dichotomy and its declining nature after 1928 is associated to colonial policies. The study also highlights the role of Indian merchant-capital in the post 1900 history of Mumias and proceeds to offer a penetrating assessment of the conflicting place of Indian trading needs European settler agricultural demands in Mumias. Evidence is adduced to demonstrate how the African needs were sand-witched between the Indian and European interests. Consequently, the evolution of a viable network of Wanga traders was stifled. This explains why Mumias 'decayed' after 1928 when the district headquarters was moved to Kakamega. These shifted emphasis from Mumias as greater focus went to other towns in the region. But the inability of the royal Wanga family to transform their political clout over the British into economic prowess is seen as a fundamental issue. The rest of the Wanga traders remained petty traders. The unprivileged entrepreneurial skills of the less connected local traders were easily petered out of competition by Indians. Thus the Wanga initiatives in trade and the local dynamic in the urban

Western education among the Wanga of Mumias : a case of the Roman Catholic Mission and the Mumias Boys schools, C. 1920 to C.1960.

Author: Murunga, Godwin Rapando

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1994

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Luyia (African people) ; Luo (African people) ; Wanga (African people) ; Catholicism ; Roman Catholic Mission, Mumias, Kenya ; Education ; Mumias, Kenya ; Ethnology ;

Abstract:

The study discusses Western education in the Roman Catholic Mission, Mumias between 1920 and 1960. Using the underdevelopment perspective of unequal exchange, the study does focus on issues of class and regional inequalities, alienation, clan and tribal jealousies and the inadequate education given to the Wanga. It is not a history of the church or the Mumias schools. The study attempts to capture various forces that are relevant to understanding the rise and development of Western education in Mumias Division. Noting that the application of the underdevelopment theory is polemical because of its wide usage mainly for economic issues of colonialism, the study argues that colonialism has its social dimension in which education is a social service. Thus, the study tries to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theory in analysing the social aspects of colonialism in Mumias. In the study, the Mill Hill missionaries are seen as vessels of Western norms and values for they are socialized in European culture. This is unlike the Wanga who have a different set of culture which is itself an educational process. The juncture between the two in Mumias and especially in the school pits two cultures together. The school being a major proselytizing instrument thus is the arena in which the subsequent drama takes place. Before the founding of the Mumias Primary School, our study reveals an educational system with a religious stress. Religious determines entry and continued attendance of school. The school stresses divine rather than secular issues. The Wanga being additionists opted for an initiative that would see them in the school. Thus the early days of the mission sees mainly the youth become Catholics and attend school. Although the stress was on the sons of chiefs, the cadre of youth in the school was mainly from lesser families. This was the start of class differentiation. The rise of Luyia nationalism, the effects of the World War I, religious rivalry and the oppression by the colonial state propelled the Luyia to demand for literacy education. The formation of the Local Native Council was the last straw to the Roman Catholic holds on education. All these factors combined to pressure the Catholics in Mumias to give some literacy education. In the final analysis the need for converts able to participate in local affairs impelled the establishment of Mumias Boys Primary School - where literacy education was offered. The study observes that missionaries enhanced tribal consciousness and clan jealousies in Mumias and Baluyia. In an attempt to curb the infiltration of protestant ideas to their mission, the Catholic Church blocked contact between their adherents and the Protestants. This in effect caused hatred between the Luo and Luyia and also between Wanga clans i.e. Abashitsetse and Abakolwe thereby undercutting cross-cultural solidarity and Wanga nationalism. Thus the struggle for literacy education was to emerge a Luyia and not a Wanga affair. The Wanga only participated as Luyia's and therefore, failed to ride the tide. Consequently, mission rivalries were a cause or regional inequalities. Missions came to depend on chiefs for their strongholds thus leading to polarities in the spread of educational facilities. This contributed to class differentiation, as some chief's became petty despots. Class and regional inequalities are thus understood in the study. A counterpoise to despotic chiefs was the cadre of elites in the mission and else where in the district. Further, this cadre of elites infiltrated the L.N.C. and championed for better education. Coupled with the rise in the number of primary school leavers, World War II experience and the political atmosphere of the time, the Catholics were forced to phase out the Teacher Training College and found Mumias Boys Secondary School. Lastly, the study recapitulates

Incidence of sugarcane smut disease in Mumias Kenya

Author: Ragama, Phillip E

Awarding University: University of Western Ontario, Canada

Level : MSc

Year: 1992

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Sugarcane/Crop diseases/Smut disease/Mumias, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Drainage of the lowland sugarcane fields, Mumias, Kenya

Author: Home, Patrick Gathogo

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 1991

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ; University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Agriculture/Crops/Sugarcane/Soils/Drainage/Mumias, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE