5 Records out of 22207 Records

Women education and family : a case of Muguga Location.

Author: Wanyoike, N M

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2003

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Women/Education/Muguga, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Mechanical properties of bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) grown in Muguga, Kenya

Author: Mbuge, Duncan Onyango

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Upper Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Bamboo ; Bambusa vulgaris ; Muguga, Kenya ; Forestry ;

Abstract:

This research projcct investigated the tensile, bending and compressive strength of a species of bamboo called Bambusa vulgaris, in all effort to contribute towards the development of a code of design using bamboo. The density of the of B. Vulgaris was found to be 590 kg/m' (oven dry). The tensile strength was found to be 94.3 MPa with nodes and 117.9 MPa without nodes. The compressive strength was 49.9 MPa with nodes and 56.7 MPa without nodes, bending strength was 107.0 MPa with nodes and 13 7.7 MPawithout nodes and the modulus of elasticity in tension was 3002.2 MPa with nodes and 3594.0 MPa without nodes. The Modulus of Elasticity in compression was 10,405.3 MPa without nodes and 7,268.1 MPa with nodes. The nodes were found to have a significant effect in lowering the tensile and bending strength of bamboo. The compressive strength was not affected by the presence or absence of nodes.

A study of sheep helminthis with special emphasis on patterns of infection and the development and survival of Haemonchus contortus larvae in Muguga, Kenya.

Author: Sakwa, David Patrick

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 1996

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Sheep/Helminthiasis/Parasites/Haemonchus contortus/Muguga, Kenya/Pathology/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Provenance variation and genotype x environment interaction in Sesbania sesban (l.) merill (Kenya).

Author: Nyong'o, Risper Nyagoy

Awarding University: Iowa State University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1991

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Trees ; Genetics ; Plant growth ; Sesbania sesban ; Eldoret, Kenya ; Turbo, Kenya ; Ratta, Kenya ; Got Ramog, Kenya ; Kenya Dryland Research Station, Machakos, Kenya ; Muguga, Kenya ;

Abstract:

Studies involving several accessions of Sesbania sesban were undertaken in the laboratory, nursery and field. The laboratory study was carried out at Iowa State University, USA to determine the best pretreatment methods for Sesban's seeds, based on four provenances. There were varying responses among the provenances to the different pretreatment methods. A 1-hour soak in hot water of an initial 100$/sp/circ$c was recommended because it had the best general effect. At the Moi University nursery, Eldoret, Kenya, an inoculation study was undertaken to determine symbiotic effectiveness among 12 accessions of S. Sesban. Effects were measured in height growth, leaf color, nodule number, shoot fresh and dry weights, and root fresh and dry weights. Accession variation was statistically significant with all the traits. Symbiotic effectiveness ranged from 11.4-60%. Field research was carried out at six different sites in Kenya: Eldoret, Turbo, Ratta, Got Ramogi, Katumani and Muguga. Fuelwood characteristics were measured 8 months after planting. The traits measured/estimated included height, basal diameter, fuelwood volume, wet wood density, dry wood density and moisture content. Volume production was greatest among Kenyan accessions and an Ethiopian accession with the highest volume per tree over all sites being 1613 cm$/sp3$. Specific gravity ranged from 0.26-0.54 with sites combined. Length of live crown, number of branches, branch length, foliage abundance, height and basal diameter were measured at 2, 5 and 8 months after planting to determine age effects on selection. Age x accession effects were not significant, whereas, large accession x site interaction was evident. Estimates for heritability ranged from 0.23-0.88 for the different traits within sites and across sites and ages. Katumani and Muguga recorded lower estimates, thereby indicating the presence of larger environmental variability. Stability analysis revealed that the accessions studied were generally unstable in their response to the environments. Because of the high accession x site interaction, broadly adapted genotypes may not be the best approach to Sesban breeding. As a result of large genetic differences, moderately high heritability estimates, fast growth, and early flowering in Sesban, it is recommended that selection should be done early in a breeding program.

Selecting Rhizobium phaseoli strains for use with beans (Phaseolus vulgaris l.) In Kenya.

Author: Karanja, Nancy Karen

Awarding University: University of Reading, England

Level : PhD

Year: 1988

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ; Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Agricultural production/Beans/Phaseolus vulgaris/Rhizobium phaseoli/Muguga, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

Available from UMI in association with the British library. Rhizobium phaseoli strains (28 isolates from Kenyan soils) were tested for infectiveness, tolerance to acidity, aluminium, high temperatures and resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin antibiotics. The strains showed variation in their ability to tolerate these stresses. Not all strains nodulated all cultivars, some strains could tolerate up to 20 $/mu$m al at ph 5.5 but less al at ph 4.5, and some multiplied at temperatures as high as 47$/sp/circ$c. Five cereal crops were assessed in the glasshouse for their suitability as reference crops for estimating n$/sb2$ fixation by beans using both the nitrogen difference and the $/sp[15]$n isotope dilution methods. Maize was chosen as the most suitable reference crop on the basis of root growth and n uptake. Significant differences were found between bean cultivars in amounts of n fixed, $/sp[15]$n content, dry matter and n yield when inoculated with different rhizobium strains growing in an acid (ph 4.5) soil. Liming two acid Kenyan soils improved bean yields significantly but addition of molybdenum had no significant effect on bean growth. In field experiments conducted at three contrasting sites in Kenya during 1987, major differences between sites and bean harvest were observed. An acid- and al- tolerant strain 9c$/sp[spctr]$ improved bean nodulation, n$/sb2$ fixation and grain yield at Gituamba (high altitude, cool and highly acid soil, ph $/leq$4.0 with 4.2 meq al/100 g soil, lacking indigenous rhizobia) and at Muguga (high altitude, cool with relatively neutral soil, ph 5.4 to 5.7 and a highly competitive and effective population of indigenous r. phaseoli strains). Beans failed to nodulate at Katumani (medium altitude, semi-arid hot area with indigenous rhizobium strains usually present). No response to phosphate fertilizer was observed at Muguga during the short rains season possibly due to low and erratic rainfall. Improved, although not significant, yields of maize following beans compared to maize were observed at Muguga during the short rains.