57 Records out of 22207 Records

The role of media in curbing corruption in Kenya : the case of the Nation and the Standard media groups

Author: Mutala, Ruth Ngina

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2912

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Media coverage ; Corruption ; Nation Media Group ; Standard Media Group ;

Abstract:

This study focuses on corruption in Kenya and the roles that the media play in curbing the problem. According to the Transparency International corruption Index 20 II, Kenya lies towards the bottom as one of the most corrupt countries, at position 154 out of 183 with a perception Index of2.2. Over the years, billions of shillings have been lost through numerous corruption deals, hence deepening the levels of poverty in the country. The problem of corruption in Kenya has existed since independence and seems to only have increased with every new government. Due to the magnitude of the problem, it has become necessary to use all means possible to curb the menace. This study examined the roles that media play in the fight against corruption. Through the agenda setting function, the media have the potential to create awareness by keeping the corruption stories high on the public agenda. At the same time, the media through various gatekeepers, the reporters, the editors and the managers decide what information gets to the masses. The amount and type of information published in the dailies is influenced by various factors such as governance, media regulation and ownership. Both quantitative and qualitative data were used to investigate the roles that media play, the effect of reporting corruption stories and some of the challenges the media experience in performing these roles. Among the findings of the study were that the war against corruption cannot be won without the involvement of media. That the media playa crucial role in creating awareness as well as in putting the government in check and pressuring it to prosecute cases that were reported. It was also found out that a lot of gatekeeping was done from the various levels of management, the editorial team and that many corruption stories went unreported. The media were experiencing numerous challenges such as political influence and the influence of the owners of the media firms. There was need to enhance the freedom of the press (to protect journalists) both through the law and the in-house regulation, thus to ensure more effective and objective reporting of corruption stories and other stories of human interest.

Media framing of women in politics : an analysis of print media coverage of women members of parliament in Kenya

Author: Thuo, Jane Wambui

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Gender/Media coverage/Women/Politicians/Newspapers/ ;

Abstract:

Scholars in media, gender and politics have interest the apparent gender differences in media coverage and framing ofthose in politics. This study sought to explore how the Kenyan news print media have framed the twenty two women parliamentarians in the tenth parliament in their coverage. The objectives of the study are twofold. The first one is to examine the amount of media coverage and level of prominence given to stories on women in politics; and secondly, to identify the dominant gender frames used in news print media content. The theoretical underpinning of this study is borrowed from the media framing theory. The research approach of the study was qualitative in nature and employed content analysis and in-depth interview data collection techniques. The sample frame for the study included two main media houses namely Nation Media Group and tile Standard Group and their newspaper publications published daily over a six months period from 1 st January to 30th June 2011. The sample size for the content analysis included all the newspaper articles that mentioned any on the twenty two women aspirants. A total of ten senior editors and writers working for the Nation Media Group and the Standard Group were purposively selected for the in- depth interviews. A key finding was that news print media coverage of women in politics is low, their stories placed in the inside pages and rarely do their names hardly make it to the headlines making them 'invisible'. The researcher concludes that 'hidden' influences such as cultural backgrounds of the media professionals, principles of what makes news and commercial interest contribute to the low coverage of women.

The role of the media in escalating conflict (a case of the Rwandan genocide)

Author: Were, Emily Nasirumbi

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Mass media/Media coverage/Conflicts/Journalists/Rwanda/Genocide/ ;

Abstract:

This study examines the role of media in escalating conflict, a case study of the Rwandan genocide of 1994. The genocide was among the most appalling catastrophes of the 20th century, and media played a significant part both internally and internationally. Globally, ftationally and locally, the mass media plays a crucial role in public policy, agenda setting, national, and international conflicts. Conflicts do not occur spontaneously but tend to have a history as all conflict have a history. The purpose of the study was to determine what role both the Rwandan and the international media played in the Rwandan Genocide. The study examined and analyzed the factors that forced the media to propelling violence in conflict situations in third world countries instead of promoting democracy and peace. The media can play different roles in terms of escalating, moderating, or balancing a conflict. The case of the Rwandan Genocide is a good example of how media can be directly involved in escalating of conflict. The mass media has been of great importance in the war leading to, the genocides in Rwanda as well as in many other internal conflicts. The objectives of the study were to determine the factors that made the media vulnerable to political manipulation, examine the role played by the media both local and international in escalating violence in the Rwandan genocide, and to examine the challenges faced by the media operations under the political umbrella in Rwanda. The study will be useful to the management of conflicts globally, to academicians, to the government and other researchers. The research was a desk review that analyzed data from both internal sources and external sources. Internal sources included information sourced from the media. External data sources included data originating from outside the media urgencies such as government sources, commercial sources, inter and intra industry sources like trade publications, journals and other sources like non-governmental organizations, institutes of economic survey and also academic institutions.

The role of print media in conflict escalation : case study of Kenya

Author: Wekesa, Stella Naliaka

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Journalists/Newspapers/Media coverage/Conflicts/Post election violence/ ;

Abstract:

This study focuses on the role of the press in conflict escalation in Kenya. The reality that will never change is the sense that media is a means of communication that plays an important role for information and community development. Today, all over the world, media is a connecting tool in the country or between countries. However, media is 'accused' of being a source of conflict by the ways of propaganda and bias As a result, media can cause problems because the society relies on it for news and information. The disputed 2007 presidential elections in Kenya resulted into widespread skirmishes following the announcement of results on the 30th December 2007. Spontaneous violence erupted in various parts of Kenya leading to massive displacement, loss of lives and livelihoods. About 1,200 people lost their lives and 350,000 people were displaced. Many moved to their ethnic homelands for security reasons while others moved to the periurban areas of the major cities in various parts of Kenya. The actual figure of those who were internally displaced by violence is not known with certainty, because there were people who were not hosted in the official camps but sought refuge among communities where there were relative stability and peace. The local media has been largely accused of fanning this conflict. Media works have been correlated to the issues that result to violent behaviors such as the correlation between massive exposure to the media and the increase of violent behaviors among media audiences. Journalists have been accused paying more attention on certain issues than others. It's also evident that there are players who shape the role ofthe media.

Electronic media in electroral conflict in Kenya

Author: Syallow, Anne Maureen

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Mass media/Post election violence/Journalists/Media coverage/Social impact/ ;

Abstract:

Ethnic diversity in Kenya has been the most outstanding factor in Ali the elections since independence. Over 42 tribes and communities that have lived together in happiness and reverence always clash when it comes to the electioneering period. In the wake of this respectful unity between the different communities, threats on issues of resource distribution and political differences cost ethnic differences and this becomes worse during general elections that come every five years. These differences have been recurrent over the years but it sadly reached its climax during the 2007 general elections when the country broke into ethic fighting after presidential elections results were fiercely disputed. This enhanced the ethnic differences among Kenyans and promoted the destruction of the cultural diversity. Electronic media news source has implications for three entities: the journalists, the organizations that the media houses represent or the involved parties, and the news consumers. Central to the model was the relationship between the involved parties as news source and the reporter. The concept of marketingdriven journalism and the role of public relations in news production lead to the concept of agenda building. In the process of agenda building, public relations practitioners channel information subsidies through the media and subsidize the news reporters' newsgathering. The role of information subsidies in the mass media is termed as 'agenda building,' and the term represents the relationship between a newsroom and its sources. This study was fundamentally a descriptive survey. It entailed the description of the state of electronic media in Kenya. The description was appropriate for collecting information about electronic media fraternity and people's attitudes, opinions and a variety of issues regarding electronic media and conflict in Kenya for the period April 2007 to April 2008. The target populations were residents of the areas affected by the post election violence, such as the Rift valley, Kibera and Naivasha. From the interviews conducted, it was evident that the general Public received most of the information and developments of the election campaigns and the election process through the leading media houses in Kenya. A majority of the respondents said they knew of the current developments through the radio. The actions by the electronic media were so intense at the peak of the electioneering process and the result was upraising and revolts from all the parts of the country were witnessed. However, the researcher found out that both the electronic media and the general public had a part to play in the violence although it was not quite clear whether these actions were deliberate or not.

Impact of media ownership on framing : a comparative study of The People Daily, The Standard and Nation Newspapers in their framing of the ICC case against Uhuru Kenyatta

Author: Tome, Francis Simiyu

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Journalists/Media coverage/The People Daily (Nairobi, Kenya)/The Standard (Nairobi, Kenya)/The Daily Nation (Nairobi, Kenya)/International Criminal Court/Litigation/Kenyatta, Uhuru/ ;

Abstract:

The intention of this study is to establish whether the owners of privately held media outlets influence the framing of news stories on critical issues affecting their (owners') interests. In order to achieve this goal, the study employed a mixed method approach . First, this research employed a descriptive content analysis of the news stories by the People Daily, Nation and the Standard newspapers relating to the ICCs confirmation of charges hearings against Uhuru Kenyatta between 21st September, 2011 to so' September, 2011. Secondly, a survey of journalists working for the three newspapers was conducted with a view to establishing whether there was a plausible link between ownership of the media outlets and the manifest bias in the news content. The findings of the descriptive content analysis show that the privately held People Daily newspaper had more favourable content for Uhuru Kenyatta as is demonstrated by the coefficients of imbalance. Furthermore, a not so insignificant number of journalists working for the privately held People Daily (as contrasted with those working for the publicly held media outlets) were of the view that the ownership did influence the news content. Interestingly, a significant number of journalists from the People Daily were ambivalent to a number of question items; a trend that the researcher thinks is demonstrative of uncertainty among such journalists occasioned by an overbearing ownership. This is just a snapshot of the results.

An evaluation of the depiction of successful womanhood in two popular Kenyan magazines

Author: Wanyama, Minneh Waithera

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Media coverage/Women/Magazines/ ;

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the depiction of successful womanhood in Kenyan popular magazines. Successful womanhood is a state of women experiencing breakthroughs that enable them scale up the social ladder. The main objective ofthis study was to investigate how discourses on successful womanhood were presented in women magazines. True Love and Drum magazines for the period between March 2011 and March 2012 were used forzhis purpose. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the study analyzed both content and discourse ofthe two magazines to determine their depiction of successful womanhood for the period under investigation. The findings of the study revealed that discourses on successful womanhood received a wide coverage in popular magazines. Results also indicated that the recurrent themes in most of the articles on successful womanhood were optimistic. A large number of articles on successful womanhood were presented in a positive language and the women featured in most of the articles were those who have excelled in their own business ventures. The principal conclusion drawn is that, for other forms of print media to succeed in attracting female readership, they need to give more coverage to women issues that should be presented with optimistic themes and a positive language tone. Moreover, there should more features on women who have excelled in their fields. This study recommended a positive coverage of women in main stream media, a sandwich approach in the presentation of negative issues around women and a shift in the pattern of language used. The study further recommended that the choice of stories to be published should be based on the value they will add on the intended audience.

Factors determining the emergence and proliferation of alternative press in the Kenyan Society

Author: Kung'u, Mathews Kamau

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Underground press/Media coverage/Publishing industry/Social conditions and trends ;

Abstract:

Alternative press in Kenya has in the recent past grown tremendously a phenomenon that can be said to have been brought about by changing political environment in the couqtry with the advent of multi-party politics. The political climate during the struggle for multi-party democracy in Kenya from early 1990's, the interests of the political class and the strong relationship between the ruling class and the mainstream media house owners brought about a self-censorship on the part of mainstream media houses which created an information flow vacuum in socio-political and economic news coverage. The resultant effect was a strong emergence of alternative publications which sprang up to fill the gaps created by the self-censorship exercised by the mainstream media. This study is an investigation of the various factors that can be considered as the driving force behind the growth of alternative press in Kenya. The study comprised 20 alternative press publications, published and sold in the city of Nairobi. Simple random sampling technique was used to obtain the sample of 20 publications from which the respondents (publishers) were identified. The study interrogated publishers of these publications with the aim of establishing what drove them into sustaining the alternative press culture. The study found out that there existed news gaps (news information vacuum) due to the way the mainstream media covered socio-political and economic issues. The study concluded that the inability of mainstream media to expose socio-political malpractices and inadequate coverage of socio-political and economic rivalry in the Kenyan society left gaps in information flow and this has come out as major factor that has brought about the proliferation of alternative press in Kenya. The study recommends that; the government should provide a conducive environment for alternative press to thrive and that the Writers' Guild should embrace the alternative press as a prime component for socio-political and economic development by creating a framework to guide their operations and contributions to the broader growth of the society.

A comparative study of the coverage of agricultural information by the Daily Nation and the Standard newspapers in Kenya

Author: Koinange, Thuku Mukundi

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Comparative studies/Media coverage/Agriculture/Information dissemination/Daily Nation (Nairobi, Kenya)/Standard (Nairobi, Kenya)/Newspapers ;

Abstract:

The Kenya's agricultural sector occupies a very significant place in the national economy as a key driver of the economy. The Kenyan fanning community lacks reliable agricultural-based mass media to educate and inform them on agricultural information leaving them with the mass media as the alternative. Among the leading local newspapers are the Daily Nation and The Standard in the print media whose coverage of agricultural information has not been assessed. A comparative content analysis study was therefore conducted on all week-day newspapers cluster sampled from a one year period divided into three month study clusters to characterize and compare the agricultural information covered and identify the framing accorded to it. The study found that newspapers carried most of the agricultural information under different themes and frames. However, most of the information was framed as farming as a business and food security. It was also found that the newspapers felt obliged to express their opinion on agricultural information where food security was threatened as seen by the high percentage of editorials they carried. It was also found that stories though largely themed as business or market information, they were in six frames. Partly this may be explained by the need for newspapers to carry most stories in their business stories after discontinuing the specialised science and technology sections. Though beneficial in reaching a large audience, questions on the information's depth and credibility remain unanswered.

Trends in newspaper coverage of women sports in Kenya between 2010 and 2012

Author: Kitula, Sammy I M

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Newspapers/Media coverage/Women/Sportswriters/Athletes/Gender ;

Abstract:

The sports industry in Kenya is currently experiencing growth and development. For example, many companies are increasingly paying millions of shillings in sponsorship to sporting events. On September 6, 2012, East Africa Breweries Limited (EABL) sealed a three-year sponsorship with Kenyan Premier League worth Sh170million. The last time the league 'had a major sponsor was between 1998 and 2002, when Kenya Breweries, BAT and Smithkline Beecham put in a combined Sh45million package a year, for five years. (Charles Nyende. 'EABL brew Sh170m KPL deal' Daily Nation 7 Sept 2012: 71. Print.) Some of the events such as the Safari com Safari Sevens and Rhino Charge have spawned huge public following and in effect, become recognizable brands. Concomitant with this is the importance of the sports sections in newspapers, where the rule of thumb has been that beefed up sports coverage increases readership. Notwithstanding the above success, reporting on women sports has continued to elicit different reactions. The media plays an influential role in creating images of both women and men. Sports coverage in the media has in many ways been dominated by the coverage of men's rather than women's participation, which can be mirrored in the traditional public perception that men are active and athletic, and women, by exclusion, are not. But with the continuous participation of women in different sporting disciplines, this has helped shape the reporting of women sports in Kenya. This study, therefore, seeks to examine the extent to which Kenyan sports writers treat sports stories involving women in their reportage. The study also sets out to establish how female athletes are treated and if the practice of portraying women athletes as the objects of humuor continues to exist. A survey was carried out on sports writers of five major dailies in the country working in Nairobi and on the sports editors of their respective newspapers. The results of this project show a hegemonic structure of Kenyan newsrooms that are focused on males and men's activities. The respective sports departments are also employing few women and including little coverage of women. At the time of this research, only The Standard had a woman sports writer in all daily newspapers in Kenya. This is, despite increased sports participation by girls and women since Title IX, the 1974 federal law guaranteeing equal sports opportunities for males and females in publicly funded schools. Implications, recommendations and direction for further research are also discussed.