57 Records out of 22207 Records

(Un)covering female advocacy in the Kenyan press : how the 'Weekly Review' defines combative motherhood.

Author: Worthington, Nancy

Awarding University: Indiana University, USA

Level : PhD.

Year: 1999

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Mass media/Women/Mass media/Media coverage/Mothers ;

Abstract:

This case study explores African news representations of female advocacy in a volatile political climate. More specifically, the dissertation examines how an independent, indigenous newsmagazine, the Nairobi-based Weekly Review , represented advocacy based on 'combative motherhood' during the era marking Kenya's transition from a single-party state to a multi-party political system, 1986-1992. Molyneux's concept, combative motherhood, refers to a strategy whereby women draw on their moral authority as mothers to assert their legitimacy in an otherwise male-dominated political arena. A qualitative content analysis was performed on all news, features, editorials, and reader letters about advocacy based on combative motherhood, focusing on coverage of three specific causes: (1) Wambui Otieno's legal battle to decide her deceased husband's burial site; (2) Wangari Maathai's environmental protest against the construction of a skyscraper in a Nairobi park; and (3) the Mothers of Political Prisoners' hunger strike for the release of their sons. Themes emerging from coverage created a split between the fundamental elements of combative motherhood, such that advocates were portrayed either as overly aggressive women ill-equipped for public debate or as well-meaning mothers whose advocacy was easily co-opted by opposition politicians. Journalistic techniques packaged text and images to suggest the advocates were associated with other political actors, who were portrayed as marginal or subversive. Coverage also emphasized aspects of the advocates' identity such as gender, ethnicity, and class as a key means of suggesting these themes.

British mass media coverage of the late wars in Cyprus and Kenya in the 1950's

Author: Jennings, P D T L

Awarding University: University of Wales, Swansea

Level : PhD

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: Index To Theses ;

Subject Terms: Mass media/Mass media/Media coverage/Cyprus ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Reporting a pandemic : a comparative study of AIDS news coverage in African and European prestige dailies.

Author: Tassew, Admassu

Awarding University: Goteborgs Universitet, Sweden

Level : FILDR

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: News media/Newspapers/Media coverage/AIDS (Disease)/ ;

Abstract:

News, especially of the health risk type is the subject of this doctoral study. The study examines the news media's reporting of our day's pandemic, Aids. In so doing, it attempts to discern the attention the prestige papers of Britain, Kenya, Sweden, and Uganda have given to Aids news coverage through the 1980s. The study also tries to find out if the news coverage of Aids is commensurate with the real world prevalence of Aids in the studied years and countries the prestige media came from. The media's role in setting the agenda for the issue of Aids is also investigated in one of the countries whose media is in the study. Furthermore, the study also probed at Aids news to find out if it also performs a risk communication activity. While conducting this examination of Aids news reporting by the prestige dailies of the two old continents; the study made use of the news value perspective to analyse the selection and then presentation of Aids news. Theories from risk communication research traditions were also employed while examining the presentation of Aids news in the news media. Finally, agenda-setting hypothesis was applied when trying to discern and analyse the media presentation of Aids news and the public perception. Having conducted an empirical investigation of the Aids news reporting by the four prestige dailies between 1983- 1990, the study shows that Aids news has been given more attention by the European prestige dailies as compared to the African ones. The early years, i.e. 1983-1987, also display a condition whereby Aids news coverage attracted more attention from the news media. Its other finding is that the Aids news coverage does not correspond to the real world prevalence of Aids all the time; and this correspondence is only observed between 1983-1987. The findings of the empirical study for the media agenda- setting suggest that conditions that will be present when agenda-setting occurs are observed. Finally, this study has also found out that the studied Aids news items do also contain a discussion of risk prevention and protection activities.

Evaluating interethnic conflict in the press : a cross-linguistic discourse analysis model

Author: McGarry, Richard Gale

Awarding University: University of Florida, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1990

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: News media ; Media coverage ; Minority and ethnic groups ; Newspapers ; Kikuyu (African people) ; Luo (African people) ; Taifa Leo (Nairobi, Kenya) ; Daily Nation (Nairobi, Kenya) ;

Abstract:

A tripartite model for analyzing interethnic conflict in the press is presented and discussed. This consolidated model interrelates pragmatic/contextual elements with cognitive and morpho-syntactic variables in order to establish subtle bias in what is commonly considered 'objective' news reporting. A series of articles, covering the 'Otieno case,' from two Kenyan newspapers, the Swahili-language daily/weekly, Taifa Leo/Weekly, and the English-language newspaper, Daily Nation, serve as the primary data base for the study. Elicited respondent data confirm the model's basis in reality. Such contextual features as the nature of ethnicity in Kenya, the character of interethnic conflict between the Kikuyu and Luo ethnicities, and the role of the press in Kenya are presented vis-a-vis the Otieno case. A reader's perception of a news story in terms of cognitive framing, i.e. networks of foregrounded and backgrounded concepts, are assessed as are a variety of linguistic strategies, such as the positioning of topics in thematic paragraphs and morpho-syntactic coding, inasmuch as they affect topic continuity/identifiability. The model is applied to news text data. It is demonstrated that subtle bias exists in nation newspapers' coverage of the otieno case, with Taifa Leo/Weekly favoring the application of traditional, ethnic law to burial matters, and Daily Nation supporting civil, secular law.

Gesellschaftliche Problematik der Entwicklung des Pressewesens im nachkolonialen Afrika, dargestellt am Beispiel Kenias und Tanzanias

Author: Belay, Getinet

Awarding University: Free University of Berlin, Germany

Level : PhD

Year: 1987

Holding Libraries: University of Bern Library ;

Subject Terms: Social development ; Political development ; Tanzania ; Media coverage ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Coverage of the MacBride Commission : a comparative study of Third World and western newspapers

Author: Maschmeier, Ruth Marie

Awarding University: University of Wisconsin, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1985

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Newspapers ; Media coverage ; United Nations Educational and Scientific Organization USE UNESCO ; UNESCO ; MacBride Commission ;

Abstract:

Non-aligned countries have expressed their concern over the dependency that exists between their media and the western news agencies. As a result they have called for a new information order much like their call for a new economic order. In 1972 Byelorussia had requested that U.N.E.S.C.O. Draw up a declaration on the uses of the mass media. As the two issues became intertwined in meetings and conferences, the debate heated up considerably. A compromise was struck in 1976 at the bi-annual meeting of U.N.E.S.C.O. In Nairobi, Kenya. Delegates agreed to postpone a vote on the declaration in return for the formation of a commission to study the problems of communication. The commission, chaired by Sean Macbride, was made up of members from the various geographical and political groups represented in the membership of U.N.E.S.C.O. The commission met between 1977 and 1979. In February 1980, the final report was presented to A. M. M'bow, director- general of U.N.E.S.C.O. It contained something for everyone and satisfied no one completely. The report contained 82 recommendations and 12 areas for further study. The aim of the study was (1) to examine the manner in which Third World newspapers carried news about the Macbride commission and its final report and (2) to compare this with the manner in which newspapers in the Western countries carried news about the MacBride commission and its final report. Three hypotheses were tested, (a) more items would be carried in newspapers from countries with members on the commission, (b) more items would be carried by Third World newspapers, and (c) items in Third World newspapers would present different issues than items in western newspapers. Twenty-one Third World newspapers and fourteen Western newspapers were searched from 22 November 1979 to 22 May 1980 and 1 September to 30 November 1980. Two hundred and nine items were found. The items were coded for date, page number, number of sentences, and topics. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. The SPSS-X statistical package was used to assist in the analysis. Hypothesis two was supported by the data. Hypotheses one and three were not supported. The similarity of the reporting of the issues in the Third World and western newspapers may be due to the fact that politicians are calling for the new order while journalists are satisfied with the old order.

Spatial variations of mass media exposure in Kenya.

Author: Averitt, Janice Walker

Awarding University: University of Kentucky, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1975

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Publicity ; Mass media ; Media coverage ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE