19 Records out of 22207 Records

Establishing the effects of Indian manufactured products on the textile and apparel industry in Kenya

Author: Mutisya, Harriet Mwelu

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Effects ; India ; Manufactured products ; Imports ; Textile industry ; Clothing industry ;

Abstract:

This study attempted to explore the effect of India's manufactured products on the textile and apparel industries based in Nairobi and its surroundings, Kenya. The target population of study was all textiles and apparel manufacturing industries that are members of Kenya Association of manufacturers KAM and operate within Nairobi and its surroundings. This study used a purposive sample of 38 respondents. Questionnaires were used for data collection. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis techniques were applied. From the findings, the study reveals a number of conclusions. Most of the textiles and apparel manufacturing industries have been in operation for mote than 10 years. A majority of them are engaged in fabric and apparel manufacturing and record an annual turnover of over 100 million Kenya shillings. Product innovation; market development; improvement in technology; aggressive marketing; and changes in customer needs have contributed to the success of the companies to a great extent. Olobalization/regionalization, technological advancement, and improved customer awareness impacted on companies to a great extent. Companies' loss of market share and decline in profits has been affected to.a very extent by the Kenya-India bilateral trade agreement. Moreover, the companies have adopted moderately important strategies like market penetration, market development, and product development in order to remain competitive in the textiles and apparel industry. The study recommends that: textiles and apparel industries should also ensure that cotton production becomes a priority in their development policies in Kenya; and the OoK to intensively and expansively focus its policies extensively on investment in the textiles and apparel industry as well as the so much neglected cotton industry.

Impacts of Maritime insecurity on peace and stability in the Indian Ocean region

Author: Limo, Irene Jerobon

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Maritime law ; Security ; International relations ; Indian Ocean region ;

Abstract:

Maritime security is a key component of collective security and thus forms part of the foundation for economic development. The Indian Ocean region, particularly the East African region does not have its own maritime policy or strategy, despite the acknowledged importance of this component of any national or regional economy. Given the unique needs of its populace, priorities and requirements of the various states, the East African part of the Indian Ocean therefore needs to develop a maritime strategy to promote economic development for its people through improved maritime security, leading to improved global competitiveness for its goods and services. To achieve the desired peace and a stable environment, cooperation and adoption of a holistic maritime legislation is mandatory which, in tum, would strengthen the maritime institutions which are crucial for a maritime strategy. This combination of strengthened and coherent legislation, institutions and cooperation would enhance the policing of, and prosecution for, illegal acts, for example piracy, terrorism, trafficking and the dumping of waste materials; it would better regulate the fishing industry; ensure pollution will be policed; countering of smuggling and illicit trade; transnational or cross-border crime would be better monitored and reduced; and further, the safe navigation of shipping guaranteed. This will eventually translate to a peaceful, a more secure and stable Indian ocean region. Thus the required good order at sea should be viewed as a function of how states should exercise their jurisdiction on maritime issues for sustainable peace and development.

International Cooperation in combating piracy and safeguarding maritime security : an analysis of the Indian Ocean Rim States

Author: Rotich, Victoria Chepkorir

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Security/International relations/Indian Ocean ;

Abstract:

Maritime issues are an essential component of the current globalized economy and maritime security is vital for ensuring sustained economic development and national security for maritime nations. This project reveals that the Indian Ocean Rim Sates have tried to cooperate in trade and business but at the same time have overlooked the component of maritime security that is critical to enhanced relations. Developing ethics that that govern cooperative regional and international security partnerships and creating the organizational structure and functional relationships required to manage a regional security partnership are essential elements in establishing an not only effective regional maritime security but also a successful global maritime security environment.

Factors influencing bilateral trade between Kenya and India

Author: Ntara, Caroline Karimi

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: International trade ; India ;

Abstract:

Since independence Kenya has experienced growth in .international trade. It has made bilateral trade agreements as well as multilateral trade agreements. These agreements have helped greatly in serving as a platform for growth and further have enabled Kenya trade in the international markets. This has facilitated economic performance of the Kenyan economy to a considerable extent. However with all the good tidings that Kenya has received from its involvement in the global market; there have been instances of widening trade imbalance with some of its major trading partners such as India. This imbalance has a negative impact on Kenya's economy. This study was involved in investigating the factors that influence bilateral trade between Kenya and India. Literature that supports trade between countries is highlighted with arguments that trade needs to benefit all involved and this brings into light the Kenyan economy and the issues of concern that result in trade imbalance. Countries need to be aware of their trade potential and then venture wisely into trade. Countries can look at their factor proportions, what they have advantage in producing and what can give them the best return. Literature also speaks of various aspects of trade that encourage countries to trade with each other. The conceptual framework gives bilateral trade between Kenya and India as the dependent variable. The independent variables in the study were bilateral trade agreements, cultural factors, economic factors, technological factors and world trade organization assistance. Chapter three gives an indication as to how the data was collected. Data was primary and secondary. Primary data was collected from journals, articles and books on international trade. Secondary data was collected using questionnaires that were distributed among the respondents. pte respondents gave information about trade between Kenya and India. This information was later analyzed in chapter four and results were highlighted. ilateral trade agreements, cultural factors, economic factors, technological factors and world e organization assistance were found to actually affect bilateral trade between Kenya and dia. Some factors affected bilateral trade to a large extent while others had a lower influence. , The results of the study indicate that the widening trade imbalance between Kenya and India can be explained. Culture, bilateral trade agreements and economic factors were some of the issues highlighted. This gives a suggestion of the areas that need to be highlighted by the government and other policy making organizations. There are recommendations that follow the findings to indicate what the government should do for trade to progress in Kenya. The recommendations indicate that the findings can be used in making policy changes that would fever bilateral trade agreements between Kenya and India, and other nations that Kenya trades with locally and globally.

Public private partnership for infrastucture development : a comparative study of Kenya and India

Author: Kedenda, Ann Rachel Achieng

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Public private partnerships/Business government relations/India/Infrastructure/Economic development ;

Abstract:

The term 'public-private partnerships' has frequently appeared in the media and in the economic development literature in recent years. As an institutional approach, however, public-private partnerships have a long history in local economic development policy. With the structural change of the economy in the developed countries and the development of economic globalization in the last two decades, developing nations have been forced to use a wide variety of incentives to compete for mobile capital and high quality labour. An exploration of a general framework of public-private partnerships helps to improve understanding of public-private partnerships. Certainly, it is important to recognize that publicprivate partnerships are not the same across countries, even within the developed countries, in their formation and operation. It is clear that funding of capital projects from the income or finances available to most governments is limited and thus development of infrastructure takes a back foot. With infrastructure that does not support development, it means that the growth of the nation as a whole also stalls as infrastructure is the backbone for development to ride on. To that end this study looks at Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) for infrastructure development, especially in developing nations. It looks at Kenya in comparison with India as its PPP structure is more advanced than that of Kenya. PPPs are seen as an alternative to the problems faced like lack of funding, skills and man power. The government still retains its role of providing services to the citizens but 'outsources' the provision of the same services to individuals or corporations that are specialized in specific area like roads, railways, ports, airports, sewerage and so on. Chapter one contains the proposal that outlines the statement of the problem, research questions, justification for the study and literature review. It also looks at the theoretical framework which in this case is the market and state failure theory. Chapter two is an overview of PPPS: definitions, types of PPPs; their advantages and disadvantages; the parties involved and the kinds of risks they face in the entire process. It also explores the reasons why governments are opting to go the PPP way. Chapter three is an analysis of what PPPs have done in other developing countries giving examples of projects that have been completed or still undergoing in Brazil, China, South Africa, Mozambique and India. Being a comparative study of Kenya and India this chapter looks a critical look at the PPP projects in the various states in India and concludes that the approach India has taken has managed to propel it towards developed nation status. Chapter four looks at the structures that India has put in place to support PPP in comparison with what we as a country have in place. It lists the policy framework legal or otherwise and other steps that have been taken by each country. The final chapter is a summary of the findings and outlines the conclusions are recommendations the paper has come to regarding the best way forward for Kenya to utilise PPPs for infrastructure to achieve Vision 2030 and Millennium Development Goals as well.

The application of geo-electrical resistivity data to groundwater modelling in hardrock terraine-an integrated approach

Author: K'orowe, Maurice Odondi

Awarding University: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Library ;

Subject Terms: Hydrogeology/Groundwater/Jangaon, Andhra Pradesh, India/ ;

Abstract:

The thesis presents the application of geo-electrical data in the field of hydrogeology. In this regard, two distinct applications of geo-electrical techniques have been carried out One is to determine a theoretical relationship between geo-electrical data and hydraulic parameters by modifying the theories developed in laboratories by Bernabe and Revil (1995) and applying the bond shrinkage process of pore network structures described by Wong et al., (1984). The petrophysical relationship thus established, have been tested with data from a typically hard rock terrain found in the Jangaon sub- watershed, Andhra pradesh, India. Secondly a site-specific relationship between geo-electrical data and an aquifer process namely; natural recharge has been developed and referred to as a natural recharge model for the Jangaon sub-watershed. In order to evaluate the coherence of the geo-electrically derived hydraulic parameters and process, these data have been integrated into a groundwater flow simulation model. To modify the Bernabe and Revil (1995) model, the theories explaining the flow characteristics of a material's pore structure have been modified into a field scale relationship between transmissivity and apparent formation factor of the aquifer materials and a relationship expressed as; In T = In Ba/ig - mk F:. Au m; This theoretical relationship was applied to data from Jangaon sub-watershed. The transmissivity values were obtained from pumping tests done on the boreholes of the area. Formation factors were obtained form geo-electrical data from the borehole sites. The relationship In T=9.9-2.5 InFa which shows that the theoretical relationship explains the relationship between geo-electrical and hydrogeological data. For a site-specific geo-electric recharge model to be developed, two methods were integrated. The first method involves using surface electrical resistivity sounding data to evaluate the resistivity of topsoil layers within the top 3 meters at each site. The second procedure is to determine natural recharge by using the Tritium tagging technique, where the flow of tritiated water within a soil profile is monitored and natural recharge at each injection site is estimated. Consequently, a correlation analysis between the two data sets was carried out with the result that natural recharge correlate very well with 'Composite layer resistivity' to produce a geo-electrical recharge model of the form R=3.1pt-73.71. The geo-electrically derived hydrogeological parameters and processes were used as input parameters into a groundwater flow simulation model. A transient groundwater flow simulation for a time period of one hydrologic cycle was carried out. The simulation period was divided into two stress periods, representing the rainy season and the dry season. At the end of the simulation period, simulated groundwater heads were compared with observed hydraulic heads. The model errors from residual hydraulic heads are less than 10% at all the observation boreholes. Scatter plots of simulated heads versus observed heads at the end of simulation period have a weighted variance of 8.89, indicative of goodness fit.

''A comparative study of the status, awareness, use and effectiveness of infomation technology in libraries of agricultural universities and research institutes of Kenya and Karnataka (India)''

Author: Ongus, Raymond Wafula

Awarding University: Bangalore University, India

Level : PhD

Year: 2008

Holding Libraries: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Agriculture ; Libraries ; Information management ; Karnataka, India ; Information technology ; Research ;

Abstract:

Information is the most vital influence on the addition of value to agricultural education and research endeavours worldwide. Scientific information is the lifeblood that sustains research undertakings in agriculture and related sciences. On its part, information technology (IT) not only simplifies mundane, research-oriented tasks but also continues to open up access to the latest information required. IT establishes vital communication links between researchers and knowledgeable experts, in their respective fields of specialization. Nevertheless, the developing world has had to contend with inadvertent duplication of efforts in agricultural research. This wasteful problem has been adduced to the paucity of access to relevant and timely information resources in a number of institutions/organizations. Consequently, this study carried out a broad-based juxtaposition of the status, awareness, use and effectiveness of IT facilities in libraries of selected agricultural universities and research institutes of Kenya and Karnataka (India). Data was comprehensively drawn from 13 stations in Kenya and 12 stations in Karnataka (India), over two conveniently staggered periods of six months each (i.e. a Matched Stage Study). In Kenya, 13 librarians, 52 library staff and 230 library users duly completed questionnaires. Conversely, 11 librarians, 24 library staff and 300 library users followed suit, in Karnataka (India). In addition, structured observations and interviews were conducted on site, within the selected libraries. Thereafter, the collected data was subjected to comparative statistical analysis techniques, which included the Independent Samples t-test, Chi-square test and comparison of ranked percentages. As a result, a number of noteworthy results were obtained on issues considered pertinent to the topic of interest. The findings elicited suggestions of an array of tactical approaches that could be customized to suit various scenarios related to agricultural information management, in the geographical regions covered. Hopefully, the libraries serving national-level agricultural research would eventually consider the recommendations as viable strategies of revitalizing and streamlining IT-based information services rendered to their respective clientele.

Sensitivity patterns serotypes of cryptococcus neoformans and diagnostic value of India ink in patients with cryptococcal meningitis at Kenyatta National Hospital

Author: Mohamedhussein, Adbulsamad

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MMed

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Medical Library ;

Subject Terms: Meningitis ; Cryptococcus neoformans ; Drug therapy ; Diagnostic tests ; India ink ; Antifungal agents ;

Abstract:

Background: Cryptococcal meningitis caused by the environmental encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is an important and often fatal infection whose incidence has multiplied severally after the advent of HIV. Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment is required to reduce the high mortality rates associated with it. Objective: To determine the culture yield and the sensitivity of India ink as a diagnostic tool; To determine the sensitivity patterns of Cryptococcus neoformans to amphotericin B, fluconazole, miconazole and 5 flucytosine;and to determine the prevalent serotype of Cryptococcus neoformans at Kenyatta National Hospital. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: In-patient medical wards, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Study population: All patients admitted to medical wards of Kenyatta National Hospital with clinical diagnosis of meningo-encephalitis . Study method: Patients with meningo-encephalitis were subjected to a lumbar puncture after excluding contra-indications. CRAG test was done on the CSF obtained. Positive CSF samples were subjected to India ink stain. The CSF was cultured and sensitivity patterns to amphotericin B, fluconazole, miconazole and 5 flucytosine were determined. Sero-typing of the isolates was carried out. The HIV status of the cases was determined. Data entry and analysis: Data was entered into a computer database then analysed using SPSS version 12. Descriptive statistics were used for both continuous and categorical data. Inferential statistics were used to determine associations. The p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Three hundred and seven CSF specimens were obtained during a 3 month period. Sixty one tested positive for CRAG (19.8%).Three specimens grew. other fungi (T. mucoides-2 and T.Beigelii-1 ) on further microbiological analysis. Fifty eight specimens were thus analysed. India ink was found to be positive in 33 CSF samples (56.9%); culture positive samples were 39 (67.2%). Three isolates (7.7%) had MICs of >2-1g/ml for amphotericin B and were thus resistant. Twenty eight isolates (71.8%) were susceptible to fluconazole having MICs of <4-1g/ml; 8 patients (20.5%) had MICs of between 8 and 16-1g/ml and were categorized as intermediate resistant; 3 (7.7%) were highly resistant having MICs of >16-1g/ml. Miconazole susceptible isolates were 37(94.9%) having MICs of <1.0-lg/ml; only 2 isolates had MICs >1 -Ig/ml signifying resistance. 5- Flucytosine susceptible isolates were 19 (48.7%) having MICs <4~g/m;13 (33.3%) patients had MICs of between 8 and 16~g/ml and were in the intermediate resistant group whereas 7 patients (17.9%) fell in the highly resistant category with MICs of >32-1g/ml. Fifty seven had underlying HIV and cryptococcus meningitis was the AIDS defining illness in 65.5% of them. One patient repeatedly tested negative for ELISA but this was not confirmed by a PCR. Al39 isolates cultured were sera-type A (Cryptococcus Neoformans var grubit). Conclusion: India ink that is currently being used widely as the sale diagnostic test for cryptococcal meningitis has a very low sensitivity thus misses a number of cases leading to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment decisions. The sensitivity patterns though concerning especially to Amphotericin B show that the isolates are still susceptible to the tested anti-fungals invitro.

Use of the Indian Ocean Dipole indices as a predictor of East African Rainfall anomalies.

Author: Okollah, Zablone

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Climate ; Meteorology ; Indian Ocean ; Rain ; East Africa ;

Abstract:

This study was devoted to the improvement of prediction skill of east African seasonal rainfall through the use of improved knowledge of the teleconnections between Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) evolution phases and the East African rainfall variability. The specific objectives of the study included determination of teleconnections between east African seasonal rainfall extremes and space-time evolutions of the various IOD phases; investigating the physical mechanisms of the teleconnections; and determination of the predictability potentials of IOD indices. The data sets used in this study include rainfall data for the three East African countries (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania), global sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and NCARfNCEP reanalysis data. The study period extended from1950 to 2003. To achieve the objectives of the study, statistical and dynamical methods were adopted in this study. The statistical methods used in the study include standardization of anomaly indices; together with correlation, regression and composite analyses._ Spacetime characteristics of a series of dynamical parameters were investigated using products from ECHAM4.5 general circulation model (GeM) and the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis to ascertain the physical reality of the IOD-seasonal rainfall linkages derived from the statistical approaches. The results of the study demonstrated that some of the extreme rainfall conditions over Eastern Africa during the short rainfall season were associated with positive and negative IOD phases. Such information will help to improve monitoring, prediction and early warning of extreme rainfall events over east Africa, reduce the vulnerability, and improve the resilience of the society of the region to negative impacts of extreme rainfall events that are common in the region.

Multitracer, multisite record of climate change from the Indian Ocean [Kenya].

Author: Prouty, Nancy Grumet

Awarding University: Stanford University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2004

Holding Libraries: ;

Subject Terms: Earth sciences/Indian Ocean/Climate change/ ;

Abstract:

This dissertation research focuses on understanding climate variability in the Indian Ocean using bomb produced radiocarbon in coral samples in order to understand water mass mixing processes in the equatorial Indian Ocean. I present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope (? 14 C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0?S, 98?E) and Watamu, Kenya (3?S, 39?E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the 14 C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. In the western equatorial Indian Ocean, surface waters are in contact with the atmosphere for a longer period of time and there is less entrainment of depleted 14 C water from the subsurface. Upwelling from the coast of Somalia and possibly Oman are the sources of the depleted seasonal ? 14 C signal. In contrast, the southern hemisphere subtropical gyre provides water enriched in 14 C. The coral ? 14 C time-series is a tracer for meridional transport in the Indian Ocean. In comparison to the western equatorial Indian Ocean, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains radiocarbon depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden radiocarbon by the surface-ocean. The rise in coral radiocarbon values at the Sumatra site are delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise at the Kenya site. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral ? 14 C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean-atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni?o-Southern Oscillation. This research also involves comparing model simulations of surface radiocarbon to the coral time-series. Coral radiocarbon time-series provide information about shallow circulation that can be used to test parameterization of ocean dynamics in circulation models. Differences between models and observed data reflect how well different models parameterize air sea exchange and mixing. The shape of the response function is a key test of any model trying to predict uptake and redistribution of anthropogenic CO 2 . This research suggests that at both sites factors such as resolution, topography and physical forcing are more important than mixing parameterization in explaining inter-model differences