13 Records out of 22207 Records

Factors affecting the aspiration for higher education of Giriama Girls in public secondary schools, Kilifi District

Author: Mwambui, Rosemary Maku

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MEd

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: National Council for Science and Technology Library ;

Subject Terms: Giriama (African people) ; Girls ; Education ; Kilifi District ; Higher education ; Secondary schools ;

Abstract:

Any stakeholder in the Education sector can not downplay it as one of the basic needs in the 21st century. This is in line with the goal of achieving industrialized status by 2020. Most governments today have general policies on education. These policies have failed to meet the varied and more specific need in various segments in their jurisdiction. Of much concern is the fact that over time and space, women have been discriminated when it comes to accessibility to not only basic education but also higher education. This is dismaying especially in third world nations like Kenya In Kenya, disparities are rife regionally and in gender. Various factors are in play in perpetuating the status quo. With this scenario, and bearing in mind the role played by education in initiating, maintaining and increasing development, then the repercussion for not paying the necessary attention to the problem of gender disparity in accessing educating are far reaching. Low education levels for women translate into them not getting high paying vocations. This isolates them from positively engaging in development activities. Moreover, lowly schooled women have high fertility levels due to their ignorance in embracing modem family planning techniques. The government policy on education is to enhance the provision of relevant, quality and equal education to all eligible school age students. The purpose of the study was to investigate and identify the factors that affect the aspiration for higher education of Giriama girls who are in public secondary schools in Kilifi District, Coast province in Kenya Also, the study intended to investigate and or identify the strategies in place to tackle these factors. The study was guided by the Feminism Theory and especially the opportunities in the society and based on the realities of history that women have been Liberal and Social Feminism ideologies. They recognize that women should have equal based factors such as students' low entry marks to high schools, administrative changes the subjects of oppression which is rooted in the structural patriarchal capitalism, there is need for change. The study used survey method to gather data. The target population was the public girls' schools of the district. The respondents were the Headteachers, the parents and their daughters and the teachers in the schools. Questionnaires, interview schedules and a checklist were employed in gathering the relevant data. The raw data was organized and analyzed manually into themes, categories and patterns. Charts and tables were used to give meaning to the results. The study found out that, poverty and illiteracy of parents and lack of role models was the major factor hindering the aspiration of Giriama girls for higher education. Outdated traditions, cultures and negative attitudes by the community in regard to educated girls were cited as contributing factors to aspiration for higher education too. Moreover, school and lack of physical facilities interfere with student's learning hence hindering their aspiration for higher education. To counter the above factors, it is recommended that the government should use its machinery to inform the people on the importance of education and discard outdated cultural practices. Furthermore, early marriages should be equally outlawed and those found perpetuating it dearly punished. The government should come up with workable pollicies that will ensure all her citizens acquire formal education. Lastly the few schooled women in the district should be appointed to higher positions to act as role models for the younger Giriama girls.

Language use in a medical setting : reconciling explanatory models of illness in the diagnostic interview among the Giriama of Kenya.

Author: Furaha Chai, Jonathan

Awarding University: University of Essex, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2003

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ; Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Giriama (African people) ; Linguistics ; Ethnology ; Witchcraft ; Physicians ;

Abstract:

This thesis is based on an analysis of Giriama divination as a speech event comparable to the biomedical diagnostic interview. Its main objective is the reconciliation of the discourse strategies used in divination with those used in the biomedical clinic during the diagnostic interview. Interactional sociolinguistics, which incorporates anthropological approaches with sociolinguistics, guided this research and data analysis. In terms of data collection, ethnographic approaches involving participant observation and unstructured interviews were used. A total of 30 diviners and three medical doctors were observed attending their clients/patients in a period of six months between October 2000 and March 2001. Unstructured interviews were used to gather more ethnographic information from the diviners/doctors and their clients. Personal Communication (PC) with some of the Giriama diviners helped to fill in information on the belief system about witchcraft and divination among the Giriama-information that is presented in chapter two. The data collected consisted of digital recordings of the interactions. A total of 25 x 74 min. Minidisks were used to record the data. Data analysis involved first transcribing the recorded interactions. From the transcripts, a representative sample of fifteen diviners and two doctors was chosen and then questions and cases of repetition were identified, coded and quantified. It follows the principles of ethnographic discourse analysis, which makes use of participants' organisational strategies while using surrounding discourse as data in understanding some fragment of talk-in this case, questions and repetition. The research found that structurally divination and the biomedical diagnostic interview share some characteristic features. However in terms of the functions of questions and repetition as discourse strategies are used, there were some differences. These differences are the ones that need to be reconciled if doctor/patient interaction among the Giriama is to be improved. The results are significant, in that they contribute to an understanding of both divination and the doctor/patient relationship. These could also have a bearing on medical training and healthcare provision among the Giriama in particular, and other communities that make use of similar 'alternative therapies' that involve the 'revelatory'divination.

The edge of Islam : religion, language, and essentialism on the Kenya Coast.

Author: McIntosh, Janet Susan

Awarding University: University of Michigan, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Ethnology ; Islam ; Swahili language ; Multiculturalism and pluralism ; Swahili-speaking peoples ; Giriama (African people) ; Kenya Coast ; Malindi, Kenya ;

Abstract:

This dissertation draws on methods and theories from psychological and linguistic anthropology to examine the social, religious, and linguistic relationships between the high-status Muslim Swahili and the disenfranchized Giriama who live in the town of Malindi on the Kenya Coast. For centuries, Swahili and Giriama lived in interdependent patron-client relationships, and the Swahili group was notoriously permeable to Giriama. Over the last century, however, socioeconomic and political developments have calcified the divide between them, to the point that some Swahili and Giriama consider the groups not only different but deeply, essentially different. This shift has affected Swahili and Giriama notions of religion and language. Both groups tend to treat religions and ethnicities as though they are intrinsically yoked together (Islam with 'swahiliness' and the traditional Giriama religion with 'giriamaness'). This conceptual tendency makes it increasingly difficult for Giriama converts to be accepted as Muslims by the high-status ethnic Muslim community. Giriama have developed a ritual strategy to accommodate this change. Rather than committing their identities to Islam, Giriama instead believe that both Islam and Giriama traditionalism are discrete sources of power, and draw on both of them in their divining and healing rituals. This maneuver is different from the 'syncretism' usually described by ethnographers, for it does not strive to harmonize the two separate loci of supernatural power into a coherent cosmological system. Giriama also reflect this conceptual shift in encounters with coercive Muslim spirits, who routinely possess Giriama individuals, making them vomit their traditional Giriama foods and besieging them with other illnesses if they partake of traditional Giriama practices. I contend that these somatic encounters with Islam are partially motivated by the fact that Giriama construe Giriama ethnicity as essentially incompatible with, and hence toxic to, Islam. Finally, Idescribe how Giriama and Swahili conceptualize language as essentially linked to ethnicity. I delineate nine forms of linguistic essentialism on the coast, and explore some ramifications of these for ethnic relations and for supernatural practices like divination that draw on essentially construed other languages.

Giriama funeral songs : a functional aesthetic study.

Author: Beja, S Karisa

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Giriama (African people) ; Ethnology ; Funerals ; Singing ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Interim report on the Giriama Vipango in the northern coastal region of Kenya

Author: Parsons, Kate

Awarding University:

Level : PhD

Year: 1999

Holding Libraries: British Institute in Eastern Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Kenya coast/Giriama (African people)/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Economic development, institutions, and technique change : intensification of cattle-feeding techniques by the Giriama of Coast Province, Kenya.

Author: Swallow, Kimberly Anne

Awarding University: University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1996

Holding Libraries: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Library ; International Livestock Research Institute Library ; Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Headquarters Library ;

Subject Terms: Cattle/Giriama (African people)/Coast Province/Agricultural economics/ ;

Abstract:

In order to strengthen economic development policy, a broad definition of economic development is offered: the mutually reinforcing increase in collective institution-building and individual ends-meeting capacities. A conceptual framework based on this definition is presented that unites into a cohesive whole concepts from literature on economic development, technique change, and collective action. The framework is focused on the institution-building capacity of a group of resource users and the ends-meeting capacities of the group's members. The elements of the framework are: extra-local factors such as national policy; physical-technical factors; the characteristics of the broader local social system; the characteristics of the resource-user group; the group's institutional regime; and short-term patterns of interaction and production. To flesh out linkages between elements of the conceptual framework, a case study . was done of the Giriama of Kenya's Coast Province. Emphasis was placed on one Giriama village located in the coconut-cassava agro-ecological zone. An historical analysis of the economic development of the Giriama was done using secondary literature. Field work focused on understanding short-term patterns of interaction and production behavior with respect to cattle-feeding techniques. Quantitative data was provided by single-visit questionnaire interviews and longitudinal monitoring. Analysis focused on the factors that affected use of a variety of means of access to others' land and feeds. Customarily, interactions over access to fellow villagers' fallowed land and crop residues for cattle grazing took place in the public-action sector. Intensification ofland use and the emergence of commercial-dairying meant that land owners placed increasing value on their fallow growth and residues such that they began to look for ways of realizing, if only gradually, the exclusive rights implied by the title deeds that they held. Indeed, it was found that the majority of interactions over access to others' land or feeds were not conducted through the public-action sector. Rather they were conducted through bargaining transactions that represented the grey area between the three collectively-defined action sectors: private, public, and collective. One factor that affected the adoption of commercial dairying was the greater tendency for interactions over feeds for these enterprises to be conducted in the collective- or private-action sectors, or the grey area between them. The factors that affected the capacity of the village to choose and implement institutions to define action sectors for transactions over land and feeds were analyzed, and implications for policy were examined.

Economic development, institutions, and technique change : intensification of cattle-feeding techniques by the Giriama of Kenya's Coast Province

Author: Kimberly, A S

Awarding University: University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1996

Holding Libraries: International Livestock Research Institute Library ;

Subject Terms: Cattle/Giriama (African people)/Kenya Coast/Coast Province/Feeds/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The Giriama funeral rite and the ritual meal : their significance to the Giriama Christians.

Author: Okello, Maxwell Oduor

Awarding University: Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: Catholic University of Eastern Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Giriama (African people) ; Ethnology ; Funerals ; Christianity ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The Christian moral education of youth in a Muslim environment among the Giryama

Author: Oduor, R W

Awarding University: Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1988

Holding Libraries: Catholic University of Eastern Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Giriama (African people) ; Morality ; Muslims ; Christians ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Gender role socialization in an East African community : social interaction between 2 to 3-year-olds and older children in social ecological perspective.

Author: Wenger, Martha

Awarding University: Harvard University, USA

Level : EDD

Year: 1983

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Children and youth/Roles/Gender/Social life and customs/Coast Province/Giriama (African people)/Ethnology/ ;

Abstract:

This study had two aims. The first was to expand on a series of previous cross-cultural investigations examining differential pressure on girls and boys to undertake responsibility. The second was to contribute comparative data on sex role socialization to the existing cross-cultural data pool. The research was carried out in a rural Giriama-speaking community in Kenya. The sample was comprised of 105 girls and boys aged 2-11 years. Normative sex-by-age group profiles of children's activities and companionship were developed from spot observation data. Pressure for responsibility was indexed in two ways: (1) the incidence of task performance relative to other types of activities and (2) time spent with infants versus peers. Girls performed more chores and spent more time with infants; boys were more often at play, involved in individual activity, and engaged with peers. Behavior observations were used to develop profiles of social interaction for 2-3 year-old target dyads defined by three age-interval groups. Differences associated with age-interval, actor sex, target sex, and actor-target sex combination were examined. Nurturance and prosocial dominance increased significantly with age and sociability decreased. Girls displayed higher rates of prosocial dominance and boys of egoistic dominance. Girl targets received more prosocial dominance and boys more nurturance. Three clusters of dyads were derived from multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis. The clusters indicate that actor-target gender dynamics modify the age-structuring of social interaction such that girls as actor and targets are associated with more mature prosocial behaviors. There are significant inter-cluster differences on task performance, individual activities, and time spent with infants versus peers. Pressure for responsibility, conveyed through prosocial dominance, task assignment, and companionship, reflect the differential socialization goals for female and male adulthood in Giriama society. The findings are discussed in terms of culture and personality theory and compared to similar data from other societies.