168 Records out of 22207 Records

User-centric Information and Communication Technology adoption model for rural farming communities in Kenya

Author: Ochieng, Daniel Orwa

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: End users ; Information technology ; Communications systems ; Models ; Rural areas ; Farming ;

Abstract:

The role of technology among populations in developing countries continues to be a topic of immense interest to researchers. Whereas technology acquisition is easily discernible externally, the ways to which a piece of technology is put to use is a process wrought with various dynamics, some evident and some not In the field of ICT today, there are numerous technological devices available and unlike in the past, the device prices have become affordable even to those at the base of the pyramid. Ensuring that the technology is put to efficient use is dependent on many underlying factors such as the relevance, the design, and the cost of use among others. The last decade has seen proliferation of the mobile phones in Kenya. During the same period, there has been increased competition from mobile service providers making the mobile phone a choice device for many Kenyans. Indeed the current mobile phone subscriptions surpassed past projections by considerable margins. Whereas those in formal employment find technology use part of the job or leisure, farmers in Kenya for example, have had to rely very little on technology use except for communication and to a large extent money transfer services such as Mpesa, Zap, Orange Money and Yu cash. Several researchers in both in developing and developed countries have studied the concept of technology adoption and several models from such studies exist in literature. Nevertheless the studies have tended to concentrate on technology adoption within formal structures, where the users are literate and where resources are readily available. For semi-illiterate users mostly within developing countries, availability of communication ;nfrastructure and technological resources are a big challenge. Therefore the technology needs. of such users have seldom been fully understood partly due to assumptions about their requirements and partly due to high costs associated with technology acquisition and deployment within the rural areas. This research focused on technology adoption process from the standpoint of farmers; more specifically farmers' ability to use and adopt ICT in their daily lives. We enlisted farmers living in rural areas where apart from Mobile phones there is no alternative communication infrastructure. The farmers are organized in groups and are drawn from three different areas of Kenya namely Mtito Andei, Kiangwaci and Bumala each having different geographical and demographic data. The farmers are engaged in both subsistence and cash crop farming and allseem to 'have had comparable issues affecting them mainly lack of information on the crop diseases and pests, the challenges posed by middlemen and the need to try ~ifferent crop varieties. In addition the lack of technological resources was a big challenge to the use of any technological innovation. The objective was to engage with the farmers from the onset to ensure that we understood the needs from their standpoint and in the pre-study period spent time with them in their homes to gain trust and ensure that the process was user-driven and user participatory throughout. Our approach was a combination of user-centric process and socio-technical experiments to bring to the fore the critical factors that determine adoption among rural agricultural users. We designed a Case Based Reasoning expert system known as Mobile Interfaced Crop Diagnostic Expert System (MICDES). The system enabled farmers learn about pests and diseases affecting their crops and it also helped us study the adoption process of ICT among the' farmers .: The MICDES design and development was based on the needs and feedback from several interactions with the farmers. The feedback obtained was used to improve the system continuously and to study the process of adoption among the farmers. Resources such as computers (laptops and desktops), mobile phones, Internet modems and airtime was provided to ensure that the farmers were able to use the system. To ens

The extent to which life balance practices are adopted in horticultural farms in Naivasha-Kenya

Author: Muinde, Anne Nyakairu Waweru

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Human resource management ; Horticulture ; Farming ; Naivasha, Kenya ;

Abstract:

Organisations in modem day competitive world can only perform at optimal levels if each employee is committed to the organisation's objectives and works IRS an effective team member. An inability to create a balance between work and personal life could affect employees' effectiveness and productivity in the workplace. As the nature of the workforce continues to diversify, it will become increasingly important for organizations to consider all the factors influencing their employees' ability to balance work and non-work commitments, and to find a way of incorporating them into their operating policies. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent to which work life balance practices are adopted by horticultural farms in Naivasha. The study adopted a census research design. Data was collected from the human resources managers from 20 horticultural farms in Naivasha using a self administered structured questionnaire. The data was presented in form of tables and bar charts. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results of the study indicate that horticultural farms in Naivasha have adopted practices relating to time and to the job to a great extent while practices relating to the place and to the benefits have been adopted to a moderate extent only. The study recommends that greater attention should be paid to practices relating to the job as well as benefits as they are the ones with the lower ratings than practices relating to time and place. In particular, the farms should introduce employee assistance programs and study leave in order to empower the employees to make better use of the other practices they have been provided. Further, the farms should consider introducing flexible working hours and increased work autonomy so that the employee can schedule their work in a manner that allows them to attend to non work matters during off peak working hours/seasons. The study also revealed areas on which further research could be conducted. For instance, it would be beneficial if further research could be conducted across horticultural farms in the entire country since the study focused on Naivasha constituency only. Further, this study was conducted on horticultural farms only. A similar study can be conducted on other sub sectors in the agricultural industry to enable a comparison between the sub sectors. A survey should also be conducted on the employees to corroborate the findings of this study.

Effects of member-owned financial institutions on diversification of livehoods among rural households. a case study of financial services associations (FSAs) in Embu County

Author: Musau, Eunice Agnes

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Financial services ; Households ; Income ; Embu County ; Rural areas ; Farming ;

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of member owned financial institutions on the diversification of livelihoods in Embu county using financial services associations as the case study. Embu county is known as an agricultural zone witq the north side growing cash crops while southern is known for subsistence farming. The study therefore evaluated whether with the implementation of the financial services association there has been either other types of farming and source of income activities started or introduced. Livelihood diversification in this study was used to refer to attempts by individuals or households to expand or find new ways to raise incomes and reduce environmental risks which differ sharply by the degree of freedom of choice and the reversibility ofthe income .. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of member-owned financial institutions on the diversification of livelihood among rural households. The specific objectives focused on finding out whether FSA credit, shareholding, ,business training affect diversification oflivelihoods, whether the household savings affect the decision of shareholders to borrow credit and whether diversification of livelihoods contributed to increased income levels. The study reviewed related literature which included a brief overview of Member-owned financial institutions, Financial Services Association model, Compared to other community - owned institutions the FSA model has the following principal strengths. Challenges faced by FSAs, Livelihoods diversification and Theoretical framework and conceptual framework. This study applied the survey design which is an attempt to collect data from members of a population in order to determine the current status of that population with respect to one or more variables (Mugenda 2003). The survey design seeks to describe the existing phenomena by asking individuals about their perceptions, attitudes and behavior or values. It is a type of descriptive research (Mugenda 2003). The target population consisted of the active shareholders in the four FSAs under study namely Kigumo, Kithimu, Kevote and Kiritiri. The shareholders comprised of male and female adults of the particular locations where the FSAs are located. Members of t~e sample were selected using probability sampling. It ensures that each item of the universe has an equal chance of inclusion in the sample interest from the sample population. The study applied stratified random sampling because the population was not a homogenous group (kothari 1990). Systematic sampling was used to select the samples in every stratum. Questionnaire, key informant interview and focus group discussions were used to collect data. A pretest was carried out on a population similar to the target population in order to assess the validity of the instrument. Data was analyzed using SPSS (Statistical package for the social sciences) and presented by use tables, pie charts and graphs. The findings were summarized, conclusions and recommendations made from the study.

Income generating activities and their influence on academic performance in public secondary schools in Tigania East District, Kenya

Author: Lichoro, Peter Kinyua

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MEd

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: School finance ; Farming ; Earned income ; Educators ; Academic achievement ; Secondary schools ; Tigania East District ;

Abstract:

Many countries in the world, Kenya inclusive have embraced the notion of basic education to include secondary schooling. On this basis the government of Kenya has introduced strategies aimed at improving access to secondary education, such as Free Day Secondary Education, opening of more secondary schools and addition of more streams to existing schools among others. However, in view of the diminishing resources and the growing competition for resource allocation among various sectors of the economy, the trend world over has been to reduce publics spending on education so as to release more of the scarce resources to other demanding sectors of the economy such as health and infrastructure (Coombs, 1983). Consequently there is increasing pressure on parents and communities to increase their financial support in order to place their children in secondary schools. Due to growing poverty levels among parents the amounts due to schools in form of schools fees are far way below what the schools require to run their programs effectively. This results to inadequate provision of learning resources in secondary schools. Njeru & Orodho (2003), World Bank (1995). The final effect of under provision of resources is a lowering of academic performance in national examinations. This study sought to investigate the influence of income generating activities on academic performance in Tigania East district. The study was guided by three specific objectives, namely; to examine the type of income generating activities engaged in by public secondary schools in Tigania East District, to establish the extent to which IGAS influence academic performance in public secondary schools in Tigania East District, to investigate the challenges faced by managers of public secondary schools in initiating and managing IGAS and their effect on academic performance in Tigania East District. The following research questions were formulated to guide the gathering of information for the study. What income generating activities are engaged in by public secondary schools in Tigania East District? What are the effects of income generating activities on academic performance in public secondary schools in Tigania East District? What challenges. Review of related literature indicate that IGAS have been used to raise supplementary funds for schools in different countries of the world as well as in Kenya. However, since no other study has been done in Tigania East District, this study sought to fill this gap. Descriptive survey design was adopted in the study where data was collected from the principals. BOG chairpersons, teachers and students. The study targeted 27 principals, 27 BOG chairpersons, 72 teachers and 340 students. The students were selected from among form 3 and four students. The total respondents were 460. Questionnaires and observations check list were used to collect data from respondents. The data was analyzed using SPSS programme and presented using tables, frequency tables, and charts. The study established a gender disparity among the principals, BOG chairpersons and teachers in favour of men. Majority of principals were aged between (68.2%) and 45 years while most of teachers were aged between 29 to 39 years. The findings indicated that most principals were holder of bachelors of education degree while only half of BOG chairpersons had diploma and degree level of education. The study r~vealed that all the principals had undergone some in-service training in resource management. The main source of school funds was fees and funds from FDSE although management of IGAS was still cited as a major challenge. Staffing topped the list of the most inadequate resource followed by physical infrastructure. This clearly showed the need for schools to generate additional funds through IGAs so as to enhance academic performance. The study showed that most IGAs were related to farming while few were based on hire of school facilities. The study established

Comparative study of bird guilds in different cropping systems on farm lands adjacent to Kakamega forest

Author: Editruda, Alfred Mbegu

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Birds ; Habitats ; Conservation ; Rain forests ; Farming ; Kakamega Forest, Kenya ; Kisere Forest, Kenya ;

Abstract:

Tropical rainforests are characterized by habitat stability and complexity. Hence, the forests support a rich biological diversity, including 40% of all bird species. However, these rain forests have been shrinking due to increasing rate of deforestation, fragmentation, and other forms of resource exploitation. Degradation and loss of rainforests has threatened their. rich biological diversity and the life-support systems. However, the rate at which birds are displaced by forest clearing and the potential for birds' conservation on farmlands are not well understood. This study sought to establish the role of farmlands adjacent to tropical rainforests in birds' conservation. The study was carried out for the period of seven months (September 2010-March 2011) in small scale farms lying between two forests (Kakamega main and Kisere) in Kakamega County, Kenya. The objectives were to determine the cropping systems in farmlands adjacent to Kakamega forest determine the spatial and temporal variability of birds' habitats in Kakamega, assess the relative abundance of birds found in different cropping systems in the study area and to determine the variability in the community structure of bird guilds in the study area. Information on crop cover types, crop growth stages and estimates of percentage cover was obtained. Data on bird species composition, diversity, richness and abundance in the identified habitats were collected through timed species counts, conducted in a circular plots of 35m radius. Individual birds were counted, identified and classified into feeding guilds. Their foraging sites were also noted by crop cover and flight height levels present at the sampling sites. Sampling of birds was done twice a week and crop growth stages were evaluated twice a month. Three major habitat types (sugarcane farms without trees, sugarcane farms with trees and farms with mixed crops) were identified. A total of 17,397 birds belonging to 126 species were found in all habitats. Bird species richness was variable among the various cover types while species diversity remained relatively stable (Shannon diversity H'=3.1 and H'=3.5). There was difference (X2=6, df=5, p < 0.05) in number of birds in different bird guilds, insectivorous having the highest number while the nectivorous contained the lowest number. Similarly, the birds showed preference for top height level than the middle and the bottom levels (X2=3, df=2, p < 0.05). Birds utilized various crop stages opportunistically and hence monthly differences were not significant (dmax P > 0.05). Farmlands in the study area hosted a rich community of birds, some of which utilized the adjacent tropical rainforest. It was also found that faimlands provided refuge for displaced species and the presence of indigenous trees and fruits appeared to offer favorable feeding and breeding opportunities. Bottom height level was, however, unstable because of the manipulations by the land owners. Nevertheless, this study showed that the mixed farming landscape in. Kakamega offered ample potential for birds' conservation provided that key habitats remain stable and are enriched with tree crops.

Analysis of poverty alleviation initiatives among small scale farming communities in rural Naivasha, Kenya

Author: Njuguna, Christine Wambui

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Naivasha, Kenya ; Poverty ; Farming ;

Abstract:

Small-scale farmers are the centre of concern about globalization because they are the largest employment and small business group among the world's poor. More than 80% of Kenyans live in the rural areas and earn their livelihoods in agricultural-based activities. More than 50% of Kenyans live below the poverty level and struggle to meet their basic needs. Therefore the purpose of this study was to analyze of poverty alleviation initiatives among small-scale fatmers in rural Naivasha, Kenya. The objectives of the study were: to identify opportunities and challenges facing smallscale farmers in meeting their basic needs as regards water for irrigation, land and training on modem agricultural practices; to determine household resources through asset mapping and subsequent zonal differences by wealth accumulation and to analyze poverty alleviation initiatives for and by the small scale farmers. The study methodology included Ex-post facto research design through use of participatory rural appraisal tools such as the. direct contact questionnaire, focus group discussions and key informant interviews. A sample of 136 respondents were interviewed that comprised of 100 small scale farmers, 6 development agencies and 30 people for focus group discussions. Quantitative data was analyzed with the use of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) where descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were computed in order to understand the patterns and nature of relationships. Qualitative data was analyzed thematically, where labels were assigned to various categories and themes. The survey found that the efforts by the small scale farmers to alleviate poverty had been hampered by lack of support in skills acquisition and farm inputs, natural disasters such as drought and dependence on rain fed agriculture. This is in addition to constrained access to markets, lack of technology transfer to farmers coupled with low levels of technology adoption. The role of development agencies was found to be' of paramount importance as they provided training and credit, farm inputs, education and health services at subsidized prices and enabled farmers to have better access to markets. However there was lack of synergy and coordination of operations among these development agencies leading to an overlap, competition and conflict. There were significant differences between farmers who received training on modem agricultural practices and those who did not (p<.05). There were also significant differences between farmers who had access to water for irrigation and those who did not have access (p<.05). Findings also showed that there were significant differences among agricultural zones and annual wealth accumulation (p<.05). It was concluded that poverty alleviation initiatives that had made the most contribution to the small scale farmers were: training on modem agricultural practices, improved access to water for irrigation, self help groups and financial assistance. It was recommended that various development agencies should work in a coordinated manner to benefit the local communities; and improved access to water for irrigation and irrigation technology would greatly improve the standard of living of the small scale farmers.

Farming systems and household food security in Kasikeu Division of Eastern Province, Kenya

Author: Ngalu, Elizabeth Kitunge

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Kasikeu Division, Makueni District ; Farming ; Food security ; Land tenure ; Agricultural production ;

Abstract:

This study examined the relationship between farming systems and household food security in Kasikeu Division of Eastern Province. The study sought answers to the following questions: One, how does the farming system employed by households in Kasikeu division affect household food security? Two, what are the constraints faced by these households in the production of their food? Three, how do patterns of land ownership and use in the division affect household food security? The study's main objective was to explore the relationship between farming systems and household food security in Kasikeu Division. Specifically, the study had the following three objectives. One, to investigate how the farming system employed by the households in Kasikeu division affects household food security; two, to examine the extent to which the constraints faced by these households impinge on household food security; and, three, to describe how gender disparities regarding land ownership affect household food security in the division. The study was guided by the theory of functionalism, which states that culture functions to meet the needs of individuals such as nutrition. The study was done between January and April 2001, and the target population consisted of rural households that practise farming in Kasikeu division. A sample of 100 farming households was used in the study, with household heads acting as respondents. The study elements were selected using cluster and systematic sampling strategies. Data were collected using structured interviews, focus group discussions, key informant interviews, observation and secondary sources. Quantitative data were analyzed using the SPSS computer programme whilst qualitative data were analyzed according to emerging themes using content analysis. The main [IDdings of the study are, one, households in the study area largely depend on farming for their livelihood. However, they are food-insure due to several constraints they face such as farming systems which depend on inappropriate technology and therefore fanners cannot produce food in sufficient quantities. The situation is aggravated by unpredictable weather conditions and lack of market outlets with stable prices. Two, farmers are forced by circumstances to dispose of any surplus produce. They have to sell surplus food to buy other essential commodities. Three, the land tenure system is a disincentive to agricultural production, since it places land ownership in the hands of men who play an insignificant role in food production. On the basis of these fmdings, it is concluded that the farming system employed by these households does not provide them with sufficient food to guarantee a healthy nutritional status. Other factors such as unpredictable weather conditions, lack of appropriate market outlets, exclusive dependence on rain-fed agriculture, the traditional land tenure system, and lack of cash crops also contribute to the production of insufficient food stuffs. The study, therefore, recommends that the government and its development partners, should come up with strategies to empower women so that they can produce sufficient quantities offood for their families.

Influence of Miraa farming on levels of poverty : a case of Mutuati Division of Igembe North, Meru County, Kenya

Author: Mwambia, Patrick Gichunge

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Mutuati Division, Igembe North District ; Khat ; Farming ; Poverty ;

Abstract:

Rural poverty is one of the challenges facing Kenya government today; and the causes include agriculture which is the most important economic activity in these areas. The type of agriculture rural population engage in especially in the area of study is rain-fed agriculture, it is depended on for subsistence and livelihood (Todaro, 1992). In the area of the study miraa farming is the mainstay of the people, and most relay on it for livelihood. Miraa farming being a key sector in the county especially in the rural areas therefore play a crucial role in poverty reduction. In the area of study residents almost wholly depends on miraa farming, because it is the main source of livelihood. But despite the growing public concern about the increasing consumption of miraa and other associated drugs in Kenya, few systematic studies have been conducted in the area on the social economic effects of miraa. The research project sought to investigate the influence of miraa farming on poverty levels in Mutuati division of Igembe North, Meru County of Kenya. Specifically, the study sought to establish the extent to which miraa farming mono culture influences the levels of poverty, to assess the impact of miraa farmer's lifestyle on the levels of poverty, to establish how gender issues in miraa farming influences the levels of poverty and to assess the extent to which miraa acreage and land size influence the levels of poverty. The results of the study hoped to demystify the existing views about miraa crop farming. Probability sampling technique was used to select responds who gave the required answers to research questions. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. Data was collected using questionnaires and interviews; as determined by research design. Analysis of the data was done using descriptive statistics with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The analyzed data was presented using percentages and frequency distribution Tables. The study findings revealed that Miraa farming and related trade activities were the main economic activities in the study area. It was established those involved in Miraa farming activities were mainly men making it a men's only affair. Good harvests, were only realized during rainy seasons with poor harvest being recorded during dry seasons which affected miraa prices a demonstration that Miraa prices were sensitive to seasonal variations. The season variations lead to fluctuations in prices and consequently worsening the poverty levels. Land size was a major challenge in the study area with majority of the farmers cultivating Miraa i

Investigation of factors contributing to environmental degradation in Tigania North Division Tigania East District Meru County Kenya

Author: Mithika, T Aburuki

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Tigania North Division, Tigania East District ; Environmental conditions ; Farming ; Soil conservation ; Water conservation ;

Abstract:

Environmental degradation which is simply defined as the deterioration of the earth's physical quality from ambient concentrations of pollutants was identified as a major challenge contributing factor to -low land productivity and depletion of water resources over the years in Tigania North Division. This came as a result of population growth farming methods, banditry and poaching activities and delayed land tenure systems. The people of this Division have been suffering over the years from food shortages and forest necessities This study was therefore carried out to investigate the factors contributing to environmental degradation in this particular division. The study method was descriptive and casual comparative in nature. The sampling procedure was multi-stage sampling method. The data was collected using personal interview method. The instrument used was a semi-structured questionnaire with open and close ended questions. The analysis was descriptive in form of measure of frequency tables and percentages. The major analysis method was inferential statistics a statistical package for social science (SPSS) was used to analysis data. The study targeted the farmers, the people working in the ministries of land. Those who have been land committees. Those working in the Ministry of environment and wildlife. The research was conducted by collecting primary and secondary data. Primary data was collected from small scale farmers in the division with the help of research assistants. Pre-testing of the questionnaire was done in one of the locations not sampled in the division before actual administration in the field. The data was analyzed form the questionnaires using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). The findings were then presented in frequency tables and percentages. The analysis was through descriptive and inferential statistics. The study findings showed that the challenges facing farmers in implementation of soil and water concentration measures were poor farming methods, high population growth lack of title deeds and the activities of banditry and poaching. The study therefore made recommendations to policy makers to formulate land policy on land demarcation and subdivision that will enhance soil and environmental conservation. From the study it was recommended that the government of Kenya should compensate those who have been demarcated parcels of land on the hills and in the marginal areas. It was also found that learning institutions should assist in tree planting, gabion building and the like. Training programmes should target all farmers and gender.

A study of opportunities for improved rural pig farming in Western Kenya : feeding, productivity, marketing and public health

Author: Mutua, Florence Kanini

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Hogs ; Busia District ; Kakamega District ; Farming ; Western Kenya ; Feeding practices ; Marketing ; Public health ;

Abstract:

An integrated study to investigate rural pig farming practices was conducted in selected sublocations ofBusia and Kakamega Districts, Western Kenya from June 2006 to October 2008. Six Focused Group Discussions (FGD) were conducted in Kakamega District before beginning farm visits. A total of 288 pig farms were visited three times in the course of the study period. Data on pig management and feeding were gathered using questionnaires administered in face-to-face interviews. Pigs were weighed and length and girth body measurements were taken using tape measures (em). Pigs were tested for Cysticercus cellulosae cysts using the lingual palpation. Two sets oftraining workshops were conducted after the initial farm visit. Discussions during the FGD were taped, transcribed and translated from Swahili to English. Data were analyzed qualitatively using MaxQDA software; analyses involved identifying common themes. Women were responsible for the care of pigs while men played a key role in the selling. Pigs were the easiest animals to sell because they do not need to be transported to the market since buyers come to the farms. Poor market channels, poor breeds, inadequate government support, inadequate animal health support, diseases, and cultural and religious differences were some of the challenges identified during the discussions. From the study it was found that more women (69 %; 512 / 735) than men were interviewed during the farm visits. The interviewees' age distributions were: <30 yrs 34 % (250 / 735); 30 - 50 yrs 44 % (327 / 735) and >50 yrs (23 %; 158 / 735). Only 2 % (12 / 735) of the respondents had completed college education and approximately half (54 %; 400 / 735) were Catholics. Farmers owned on average 2.33 (?2.01) acres of land; this ranged from 0.125- 10 acres. The mean Number of nursing, growing and breeding pigs owned per farm were 5.0 (?3.4), 1.8 (?1.2) and 1.5 (?O.9), respectively. Pork was consumed by 74 % (212 / 288) of the farmers. It was the most preferred of all the meats by 39 % (49 / 124) and 27% (42 / 154) (p=0.003) of the farmers in Kakamega and Busia Districts, respectively. Most (73 %; 209 / 288) farms had no pig house because: they believed this was not necessary (8 %; 16/209); there was no time to build a pig house (13 %; 28 / 209); the farmer lacked the skill (11%; 23 /209); the farmer lacked money to buy construction materials (45 %; 93 / 209). More pig houses were observed in Kakamega than in Busia District (OR=5.4; CI 3.1-9.7). Pig-level and household-level prevalence of porcine cysticercosis were 4 % (52 / 1290) and 15 % (43 / 288) respectively. A total of 840 pigs were weighed during the study, including 363 young ts 5 months), 305 market age (5.1-9 .9 months) and 172 breeding age (2: 1 0 months) pigs. Separate weight estimation models were developed for each category of pig using a random sample of 75% of the data and then validated with the remaining 25 % of the data. These analyses were completed using Stata? statistical software. The young, market and breeding pigs weighed on average 12 (?6), 30 (?11), and 42 (?17) kg, respectively. The ADG for young, market and breeding pigs were 93 (?52) g, 125 (?58) g and 101 (?80) g, respectively. The weight estimation models were as follows: young pig weight = [0.18 (length) + 0.36 (girth) - 16]; market-age pig weight = [0.39 (length) + 0.64 (girth) -48]; breeding pig weight = [0.36 (length) + 1.02 (girth)-74]. The length and girth explained 88% - 91 % of the total variation in pig weight. The mean age at which sows farrowed for the first time was 12 months (?5.4) while the mean number of litters born to a sow before she was sold was 1.04 (?0.21). Average number of pigs born alive and weaned per litter were 7.85 (?2.55) and 6.61 (?3.25) respectively. Pigs were at:S 4 weeks (56 %; 182/324),5 - 8 weeks (36%; 117/324), or >8 weeks (8 %; 25 / 324) of age. The average price for weaned piglets was Ksh 619 (?174); however, this price was lower in Bu