376 Records out of 22207 Records

Corruption and traditional African morality : a case of the Kabras community of Western Kenya

Author: Kivoi, Douglas L A

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Kabras (African people)/Ethnology/Traditions/Corruption/Morality/Social psychology/Abakabras USE Kabras (African people) ;

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to establish the link between corruption and anachronistic African traditional moral value systems within the context of the Kabras morality of western Kenya. Thus this dissertation focused on socio-cultural 'moral' value systems that it believed are responsible for abetting corruption in the Kenyan society since traditional communal attitudes and beliefs seem to have 'toned down' condemnation of corrupt persons especially if the suspect comes from 'ones' community. Perpetrators of corruption often find some rationalizations to pacify their consciences off feelings of guilt and shame. The main argument of this study was that some traditional African 'moral' values have undermined the fight against corruption. The study has established that moral values like respect, reciprocation and trust can become vices if they are interpreted and practiced wrongly. For example, authoritarianism silences critical inquiry, probity and accountability all in the name of 'respect for authority.' If trust is wrongly interpreted it negates common sense which is vital for human well being. Negative ethnicity breeds egoism at the expense of the common good. We examined various elements of the Kabras culture (their proverbs and WIse sayings) and their significance in the creation of philosophy. Here knowledge claims made by community elders and empirical data collected through anthropological, sociological and historical activities was discussed and analysed through logical and conceptual analysis. Qualitative data was gathered from in-depth unstructured interviews, direct observation, written document reviews and other secondary sources Qualitative research was aimed to gathering an in-depth understanding of human behavior and the reasons that govern such behavior. The qualitative method investigated the why and how of decision making, not just what, where, when. Hence, smaller but focused samples were used in this research. This was in agreement with Bent! who argues that qualitative methods and case study research may be used both for hypotheses-testing and for generalizing beyond the particular cases studied. It also involved participant observation where the researcher systematically seeked out and organized data concerning what was being studied based on humanism theory and methodology rather than focusing on achieving a situationally defined goals. Quantitative data was collected through structured interviews both formal and informal, personal observation and individual participation in community sessions especially during settling disputes amongst community members and other communal gatherings. This study viewed corruption as a moral problem hence its adoption of humanism theory. Humanism among other characteristics extends moral equivalence to all persons. Humanism is a philosophy that espouses reason, morality, and the search for human fulfillment while rejecting supernatural and religious dogmas as the basis of morality and decision making. This requires human beings to evolve from the tendency to identify with groups thus propagating corruption, to a tendency to identify with all persons. This study found out that traditional African moral values and customs have contributed to the flouting of moral rules and regulations that govern human : relationships thus opening up avenues for corruption to thrive. Some African traditional moral values seem to encourage disrespect for formal procedures and regulations thus promoting nepotism hence violating the principle of objectivity and fairness. This study also found out that people whose conscience (s) has not been properly nurtured are deceived by misinterpreted forms of reciprocation, authoritarianism, aversion for scrutiny and ethnocentrism. This study has also highlighted the disintegration of moral and national values as being responsible for aversion to transparency and accountability in society. The study recommends moral empowerment, civic educatio

Tourism and its effects on cultural heritage : a case study of Lamu and Gede ruins at the Kenyan Coast

Author: Ndogoto, Tabitha Wangari

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Lamu, Kenya ; Gedi, Kenya ; Tourism ; Ethnology ;

Abstract:

This research investigates the impact of tourism on cultural heritage at the North Coast of Kenya. Specifically, it focuses on Lamu and Gedi sites which are major heritage tourist destinations. With the aid of interviews and properly designed questionnaires, observation and recording it has been established that tourism and related activities have had major negative impacts on the cultural heritage of these sites. The research also utilises models that explain the growth of the phenomenon of tourism and what it implies in terms of the impacts it has on cultural heritage especially on the area of study.

The impact of media, globalization and cultural imperialism on African cultural identity : a case study of Kenya from 1900-2009

Author: Ishimwe, Euloge

Awarding University: United States International University-Africa, Kenya

Level : Master of Internatio

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: ;

Subject Terms: Impact analysis/Mass media/Globalization/Ethnology/Social life and customs/History ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Contextualizing the family : the theologies of family of the New Testament, Luther, and the Samburu through the lens of a contextualization model [Kenya].

Author: Apel, Dean M

Awarding University: Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Religion ; Theology ; Christianity ; Ethnology ; Families and family life ; Samburu(African people) ;

Abstract:

As a universal human construct, family represents an important and valuable topos for theological cross-cultural analysis. A missiological model (contextualization) is described and proposed to analyze three contextualizations of family and theology, viz. the New Testament, Martin Luther's theology of the family and the contemporary experience of the Samburu people of northern Kenya who are redefining family structures in the juxtaposition of tradition, globalization and Christian missionary activity. The model is assessed for its heuristic value, i.e. its ability to disclose the contours of both historical and contemporary 'theologies' of family and to render the moments available for the theological reflection of other contexts. The analysis and its results provide a foundation for developing guidelines for thinking about and doing Christian family in a variety of contemporary contexts and facilitate dialogue between such contexts.

A study of some aspects of mystical powers : magic, witchcraft and sorcery among the Chuka people

Author: Kiremu, Henry Gitari

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Chuka (African people)/Witchcraft/Traditions/Indigenous religions/Ethnology/Christianity ;

Abstract:

This is a study on mystical powers, magic, witchcraft and sorcery in Chuka Community which is one group of the Meru people. The writer of this work decided to study this area out of curiosity; because as he was growing he had heard very many stories and that he wanted to discover whether they were superstitious or just falsehood. To add more knowledge to the study, the writer consulted other works that were within his reach. He also interviewed some church leaders to gain more knowledge. He interviewed the most feared magicians, witches and sorcerers among the Chuka. The objectives of this study are to analyze the knowledge that is derived and put it in writing to be read by the future generations. The second objective is to identify the religious role of their use by the community. The third objective is to investigate the social political and economic implications of magic, witchcraft and sorcery to the Chuka people. The study utilizes two main methods in the collection of data. These are questionnaire interview method and observation as the primary sources. For the secondary sources of data which forms the bibliography, various libraries were visited, which include Jomo Kenyatta Memorial (J.M.K.L) in the main campus University of Nairobi, St. Paul's University, Limuru, the Institute of African Studies in the Kenya Museum and Parklands Campus faculty of Law among many others. The above methods of data gathering were expected to complement and supplement each other. The study is guided by three hypotheses. The first one is that the practice of magic, witchcraft and sorcery has adversely influenced Christianity in Chuka Community of the Meru People. It has also affected other communities of the larger Meru. The second hypothesis is that the Christians have stated publicly that they were practicing magic, witchcraft and sorcery before being converted. They did this so as to attract members to their congregations. The third hypothesis is that the practice of magic witchcraft and sorcery is a traditional religious heritage of the Chuka people and other communities of the Meru Society. A theoretical framework that was put forward by 1. S. Mbiti is the basis for this study. It states that magical objects symbolize power which comes from God. According to Mbiti the power may directly be supplied by God or it may be through the spirits, the living dead or as part of the invisible force of nature in the Universe (1.S. Mbiti, African Religions and Philosophy, P. 199). This writer concurs with Mbiti because God owns everything in the earth (PS 24: 1). Some missionaries have asserted that magic, witchcraft and sorcery belongs to the devil e.g Gerham RJ. Doing Mrican Christian Theology; an Evangelistic Perspective, Kisumu, Kenya, 1983 P. 16. From this study it has become apparent that mystical powers have a reality and not superstitious as it has been alleged by some Christians. The writer has discovered that some Christians are using magical powers in the healing ministry. They tap the powers in the healing ministry. They tap the powers by chanting magical formula Abracadabra. They do this through the help of magicians who enlighten them. But they go to look for those powers at night.

An arts-based educational framework for fostering intercultural unity in Kenya.

Author: Nyaberi, David Ogega

Awarding University: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education ; Art education ; Ethnology ;

Abstract:

On December 27, 2007, presidential and parliamentary elections were held in Kenya to elect leaders for a five-year term. In January 2008, violence broke out in many parts of Kenya because the main opposition political party accused the government of rigging the elections. This rigging allegation triggered violence in which some of the ethnic groups turned hostile against each other. More than 1000 people died in the skirmishes and several thousands were displaced from their homes. Hostility escalated to a level the government could not control. The international community stepped in to assist with food, shelter, and other essential needs. Former United Nations Secretary General, Kofi Annan, stepped in to arbitrate talks between the opposing sides. Although the disputed elections were blamed for the crisis, the main cause was the longstanding land disputes between various ethnic groups. Ethnic conflicts in Kenya have always been a problem since independence from Britain in 1963 and cultural diversity in Kenya has always posed great challenges to uniting Kenyans. In an attempt to address the challenges of cultural diversity in Kenya, this dissertation explores ways in which arts education could be instrumental in teaching intercultural values and appreciation of ethnic diversity in Kenya. The dissertation attends to and addresses questions about Kenyan educational scholarship, policy formation, and implementation strategies. The dissertation conceptualizes and makes recommendation for a national K-4 educational framework for Kenya, and introduces an educational policy framework that will guide K-4 curriculum development, instructional approaches, and teacher training. This approach is based on the belief that it is of the young age that children begin to build their personal identities, and to learn the values of their society.

Influence of mother tongue and culture on the teaching and learning of English language : a study of primary day schools in Isukha of Western Kenya

Author: Omamo, Davies

Awarding University: Moi University, Kenya

Level : MPhil

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Moi University Margaret Thatcher Library ;

Subject Terms: English as a second language ; Primary education ; Isukha (African people) ; Ethnology ;

Abstract:

The study set out to investigate the influence of mother tongue and culture on the teaching and learning of English as a second language in primary day schools among the Isukha of western Kenya. It sought to identify the linguistic and cultural challenges facing the teaching of English and establish the effect of instructional methods. The study aimed at examining how the lsukha language and culture as reflected in its people's character, values and customs; their artistic endeavours and how they educate their children, affects the teaching and learning of English language in primary schools. The objectives of the study were to identify the linguistic and cultural challenges facing the teaching and learning of English language in primary day schools; establish the influence of instructional methods on the teaching and learning of English; identify the factors that hinder proficiency in English language in primary day's schools among the Isukha. Systematic random and purposive sampling techniques were employed to select the study sample. The study sample comprised 20 mixed primary day schools selected through systematic random sampl ing from a total of 60 schools. 100 teachers of English selected through purposive sampling technique participated in the study. The study employed multidisciplinary approaches of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Data for the study was obtained from the teachers of English in primary day schools through interview schedule, self-administered questionnaire, as well as general observation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study findings revealed that a child's first language and culture have educational value and role in formal education. Mother tongue is beneficial to a child's mental growth, personal development and educational progress. It was found out that pupils perform more successfully when instructional strategies acknowledge, respect and build upon the language and culture of the home. The study recommends that there is need to provide a greater and swifter move towards strengthening mother tongue education in order to create a solid literacy base for later education in English.

Changing Kamba, making Kenya, c.1880-1964

Author: Osborne, Myles Gregory

Awarding University: Harvard University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2008

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: History ; African history ; Kamba (African people) ; Ethnology ;

Abstract:

This dissertation analyzes the evolution of Kamba ethnicity between c. 1880 and 1964, and the contribution of the understudied Kamba to the making of colonial Kenya. By the time of the Second World War, British officials believed the Kamba to be one of the premier 'martial races' of Africa; but as demonstrated here, this was the result of a long process of ethnic formation, involving influence from factors as diverse as the environment, the colonial state, internal Kamba politics, and national and international events. This dissertation demonstrates that current scholarship which views the Kamba as 'traders' during the nineteenth century ignores the strong warrior traditions which Kamba possessed during the pre-colonial period, which they then expressed through service in the police and later the army under colonial rule. In 1938, Kamba leaders launched a unique protest against the government in opposition to its 'destocking' policy, which had resulted in the confiscation of thousands of Kamba cattle. As a result of this-and the importance of Kamba soldiers in the Second World War-the Kamba enjoyed a privileged relationship with the government. Thus following the war, Kamba chiefs were able to press for disproportionate benefits from new welfare and development projects, shown here as simple tools of imperial control, rather than as programs which featured any genuine effort to improve the overall welfare of Africans. This trend became strikingly clear during Mau Mau, the uprising in which the Kamba were in position to play a pivotal role; this fact was recognized by a cadre of powerful Kamba chiefs, almost all of whom were veterans of the Second World War, and who were well aware of the threat that their 'martial traditions' posed.

An ethnographic examination of perspective consciousness and intercultural competence among social studies student-teachers in Kenya, East Africa.

Author: Mathews, Sarah A

Awarding University: Indiana University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2008

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education ; Ethnology ; Cross-cultural studies ; East Africa ; Student teaching ;

Abstract:

This study examined the impact of a cultural immersion, student-teaching abroad experience on the way white, Midwestern preservice teachers think about and plan to teach about the world. As part of the Global Exchange Project (GEP, a pseudonym) fourteen preservice teachers spent eight weeks living and teaching in Kenya, East Africa. As a participant-observer I followed four secondary preservice teachers through five weeks of the experience. Data collection included a series of in-depth taped and transcribed, semi-structured interviews that captured the participants' prior life histories, narratives of critical experiences in Kenya, and reflections after they returned to the U.S. Additional data came from my observations of the preservice teachers while teaching, field notes of their social interactions, and concept maps they constructed to describe how they will teach about Kenya. World-views were often impacted during initial encounters, moments of cultural dissonance, and when participants reflected back on the process. Many began to acknowledge their own culture characteristics and privilege as they became the minority in social situations. Narratives of critical moments in the participants' experiences demonstrate that although individuals actively construct perspectives within their lifeworlds they are also impacted by systems of power and oppression. Finally, these narratives indicate the potential for incorporating new global content, issues, and perspectives into secondary social studies instruction. At the end of this research, I suggest areas teacher educators should address when promoting a more inclusive, and less ethnocentric, view of the world.

The African renaissance : rediscovering Africa's history, culture, identity and its rightful place in the international community for a brighter future

Author: Pete, Afram Kambona

Awarding University: United States International University-Africa, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: ;

Subject Terms: Africa/History/Ethnology/Globalization ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE