28 Records out of 22207 Records

Raising immigrant Kenyan children in America : how families negotiate academic and cultural issues.

Author: Njeru, Margaret Wambui

Awarding University: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2009

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education ; Immigration ; Cross-Cultural studies ; Families and family life ;

Abstract:

The study investigated the experiences of immigrant families of Kenyan background in the U.S. In my statement of problem, I stated that while the number of contemporary African immigrants has continued to grow in the U.S., little in terms of research has been done to show what their experiences in their new society is. This has meant that there is little knowledge about their lives, and little to draw from in terms of research. At the same time, researchers and scholars in education have increasingly demonstrated the strong connection between academic performances of children, and their home backgrounds, and hence the need for educators to possess such knowledge. A general question for my research was 'What are the families' goals academically and culturally in the U.S.?' Two subsequent research questions were (1) What are the families doing to help the children reach their academic goals in a racialized U.S. society? and (2) What are the families doing to help their children reach their cultural goals in a racialized U.S. society? In terms of theory, I used the sociocultural theoretical framework as an umbrella framework, under which I included the 'voluntary immigrant' framework as discussed by Ogbu (1986), the 'language as power' framework as per Bourdieu (1991), as well as theories surrounding the concepts 'culture' Rosaldo (1989), and identity and identity construction (Hall, 1992b). All these specific frameworks were informative as I did my final data analysis. The study was qualitative in nature, and mainly used two methods, that is, interviews and observations. A total of 16 respondents participated in the study. These included six parents and six children, all who were attending school between 5 th and 11 th grades. I also interviewed four teachers who were either teaching the children at the time, or had taught them earlier. My data analysis was inductive in nature, i.e. the analysis was grounded in the data. I organized the data into emerging themes which I presented in chapters 4 and 5. These two chapters were organized in a mariner that corresponded roughly to the two research questions. My findings indicated that at the academic level, all these families had high expectations of their children, and they demonstrated a great amount of participation in their children's school work as well as in extracurricular activities. Teachers interviewed indicated that they were greatly impressed with the children's academic performance and their strong work ethics. They also found the parents to be very cooperative and supportive of their children's school work. Culturally, most parents said that they tried to maintain a balanced culture- both Kenyan/African and American, in their homes. They did note, however, that living and raising children within the larger American culture presented its own challenges. A significant finding in this work was that race, i.e. being black, did not interfere with the academic progress of the children, in spite of growing up in a society where academic performance of Black children had traditionally suffered. The different socioeconomic and historical experiences of these two groups of people were cited as a possible explanation for this phenomenon, and Ogbu's 'voluntary' versus 'involuntary' immigrant framework offered some insights here. My final chapter attempted to relate my findings to the existing literature review, and also explained how the findings interacted with the sociocultural framework. In general, the goals and experiences of my participating families appeared to resemble those of many other immigrants from other parts of the world living in the U.S. Theoretically, the findings seemed to fit in quite well with the various sociocultural theories discussed.

Possible selves and goal orientations of Kenyan post-secondary students in the south-east United States.

Author: Wambua, Joash Mutua

Awarding University: University of Alabama, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2008

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education/Self culture/Orientations/Higher education/Cross-cultural studies/ ;

Abstract:

In this study, the relationships among Kenyan undergraduate students and their possible selves and goal orientations was investigated. It also examined how the sociocultural aspects of gender and racial-ethnic identity relate to these constructs. This, in effect, contributes to the gap in the literature about the many Africans who are increasingly arriving in the United States. This group has not been adequately studied by either sheer oversight or because of their racial homogenization with African Americans. Indeed, this flagrant omission in literature ignores the vast sociocultural and historical differences. The research question was answered using multiple regression analyses. A significant relationship was found between students' balanced possible selves and their mastery goal orientations. This indicates that students with more balanced possible selves have a higher mastery goal orientation. Attending a large research university was found to relate positively with balanced possible selves. Additional analyses also indicated that there is a significant positive relationship between length of stay in the United States and possible selves. This positive relationship could be indicative of the students' continued enculturation into an individualist society that increases the number of balanced possible selves. Recommendations for further study include studies with students mainly from the different countries and cultures in Africa. Further research that includes African Americans is also recommended. Comparison studies between students from English speaking countries and those from non-English speaking countries are recommended

An ethnographic examination of perspective consciousness and intercultural competence among social studies student-teachers in Kenya, East Africa.

Author: Mathews, Sarah A

Awarding University: Indiana University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2008

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education ; Ethnology ; Cross-cultural studies ; East Africa ; Student teaching ;

Abstract:

This study examined the impact of a cultural immersion, student-teaching abroad experience on the way white, Midwestern preservice teachers think about and plan to teach about the world. As part of the Global Exchange Project (GEP, a pseudonym) fourteen preservice teachers spent eight weeks living and teaching in Kenya, East Africa. As a participant-observer I followed four secondary preservice teachers through five weeks of the experience. Data collection included a series of in-depth taped and transcribed, semi-structured interviews that captured the participants' prior life histories, narratives of critical experiences in Kenya, and reflections after they returned to the U.S. Additional data came from my observations of the preservice teachers while teaching, field notes of their social interactions, and concept maps they constructed to describe how they will teach about Kenya. World-views were often impacted during initial encounters, moments of cultural dissonance, and when participants reflected back on the process. Many began to acknowledge their own culture characteristics and privilege as they became the minority in social situations. Narratives of critical moments in the participants' experiences demonstrate that although individuals actively construct perspectives within their lifeworlds they are also impacted by systems of power and oppression. Finally, these narratives indicate the potential for incorporating new global content, issues, and perspectives into secondary social studies instruction. At the end of this research, I suggest areas teacher educators should address when promoting a more inclusive, and less ethnocentric, view of the world.

Towards an effective Christian cross-cultural youth training model : a Youth Ministry International case study [Kenya].

Author: Kaleli, Jeddy Katule

Awarding University: Liberty University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education/Cross-cultural studies/Children and youth/Youth Ministry International/Training/ ;

Abstract:

This project is an attempt to explore the indispensable components of an effective Christian cross-cultural youth training model within the context of contemporary youth culture. Taking Youth Ministry International training philosophy as a case study, it analyzes it from an African Christian perspective within the framework of Biblical, anthropological and missiological perspectives. The study has revealed that an effective Christian cross-cultural youth training model must take seriously the cultures in which others live without compromising the authority of Biblical absolutes.

Perceptions of current and prospective Kenyan international students on the Kenyan international student lifestyle in the United States.

Author: Mutai, F Wairimu Wanjau

Awarding University: University of Kent, England

Level : PhD

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education ; Foreign students ; University students ; Higher education ; Cross-cultural studies ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Globally connected yet culturally bound : constructions of cultural alterity among African Americans and Kenyan immigrants.

Author: Butler, Tramayne Michelle

Awarding University: University of Michigan, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2006

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Anthropology ; African Americans ; Cultural change ; Cross-cultural studies ;

Abstract:

Through an examination of ethnic relations between African Americans and East African immigrants in Chicago, I describe how experiential differences and racial ideology affect the construction of cultural boundaries between diasporic populations of African descent. I explore how Kenyans as black immigrants, who bring a different level of race consciousness, confront being lumped into the category of 'black' with African Americans and assess the role that globalized racial imagery plays in both constructing and deconstructing cultural boundaries. I focus on the tension between globalization and the proliferation of cultural identities, often characterized as a global tendency towards 'homogenization' and 'heterogeneity.' This tension is treated uncritically in much postmodern theory that tends to fetishize circulation. Drawing on Neo-Boasian as well as phenomenological conceptualizations, I suggest a theoretical model that emphasizes both global interconnectedness as well as cultural difference. By seeking to elucidate the process of cultural boundary construction as well as transnational discourses of sameness, I demonstrate that these diasporic populations are involved in a continual dialectic of resistance to these hegemonic constructions that seek to dominate them.

The experiences of Kenyan students in two midwest United States states : benefits, challenges and coping strategies.

Author: Njeru, Grace Muthoni

Awarding University: University of Missouri-Columbia, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2006

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Sociology ; Students ; Cross-cultural studies ;

Abstract:

The large number of foreign students in the United States raises questions about the experiences (positive and negative) of these students in their new communities. This qualitative study explores the experiences of Kenyan students, the largest African student population in the U.S., and seeks to fill an existing gap in the literature pertaining to the needs of foreign students in the U.S. Data to inform the study were gathered through focus groups and personal interviews, observation, questionnaire, and review of documents. Respondents identified material (financial hardships), relational (role strain), and psychological (fear, lack of support, struggling with identity) as critical challenges. Positive experiences included educational achievement, ability to make choices regarding career and educational goals, assertiveness, independence and a sense of personal accomplishment. Recommendations included staff sensitization, provision of financial assistance, employment opportunities, mentoring and advising services. They also recommended additional research be done to explore the needs of foreign students all over the world.

The effects of a responsibility-based character education program on middle school academic achievement and school climate at an international school in East Africa [Kenya].

Author: Howard, Terry A

Awarding University: University of Central Florida, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Education/Cross-cultural studies/Middle schools/Academic achievement/East Africa/ ;

Abstract:

The purpose of this research was to determine the effectiveness of a character education program on middle school student academic performance, effort and attitude about their school located in an international setting. Middle school students at the participating international school were assigned to either an experimental or control group. Those students in the experimental group classes received a series of 12 lessons focusing on the character trait of responsibility. Those students in the control group classes did not receive these lessons. Twelve responsibility-based lessons were presented to students in the experimental group. Student academic grades in six different academic subjects, effort scores in six different academic courses, and student attitude concerning school climate constituted the dependent variable. The literature review and the general results of this study indicate that there are many factors that may influence student academic performance, effort or attitude. Various character education programs which have been designed to be integrated into school curricula as part of pre-existing courses or as stand alone programs have had varying levels of success. There is limited quantitative data available to support the claims that many existing programs make related to their effectiveness. The data collected from this study were also inconclusive making it difficult to generalize the findings beyond the scope of this study. While certain middle school grade levels showed statistically significant improvement in some academic disciplines or effort improvement in some subjects it would not be appropriate to generalize the findings based on this investigation. Implications of this study and suggestions for future investigations are discussed.

Missiological and cultural implications for Kenyan immigrants in the United States : a case study of Kenyan immigrants in metro Atlanta, Georgia.

Author: Gitahi, George G

Awarding University: Reformed Theological Seminary, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Anthropology ; Ethnology ; Cross-cultural studies ; Atlanta ; Georgia ; United States ; Immigration ;

Abstract:

This research is a case study of Kenyan immigrants living in Metro Atlanta in Georgia. The main task was to explore cultural and missiological implications for Kenyan immigrants in the United States but limited to Metro Atlanta, Georgia. The Research Question is: In what ways and to what extent do cultural distinctives among Kenyan immigrants of Metro Atlanta relate to their global mission perspective? In attempting to answer this question the research explored the relationship between perceived cultural distinctives and global mission perspectives among Kenyan immigrants in Metro Atlanta. Findings and conclusions are categorized in three major areas: immigration, cultural diversity and mission. The research conclusions indicate that cultural distinctives among Kenyan immigrants of Metro Atlanta relate to their global mission perspectives. Cultural identifiers are crucial in enriching and enhancing the global mission. In a society that is increasingly becoming diverse, Kenyan immigrants are bound to be part of a myriad of cultural and social expressions prevalent in the United States of America. The study has suggested some generalizations that are derived from the review of literature and findings. These generalizations are assumed to be applicable in areas outside the location of case study.

An exploration of the intercultural communication experience between Ethiopian and Kenyan professionals working in selected multinational organizations, Nairobi

Author: Mulugeta, Abraham

Awarding University: Daystar University, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: Daystar University Library ; University of Nairobi Medical Library ;

Subject Terms: Cross-cultural studies ; Ethiopia ; Communication ; Professionals ;

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to explore the intercultural communication experiences between Ethiopian and Kenyan professionals working within selected multinational organizations in Nairobi. Five multinational organizations namely: UN (United Nations), World Vision, Cooperative for Assistance Relief Everywhere (CARE), International Organization for Migration (IOM) and Oxfam were identified for the sampling. The study was qualitative and used exploratory approach. It was carried out through in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. A total of sixteen in-depth interviews with purposively selected Ethiopian and Kenyan professionals were conducted. The data obtained was analyzed based on themes adapted from Kluckhonn and Strodtbeck?s Value Orientation Model and other borrowed from Samovar et al (1981) and Lingenfelter and Mayers (1986). The findings of the study showed that there were some differences between Kenyan and Ethiopian professionals who work in different multinational organizations in terms of verbal signals, and orientation towards nature, time and work.