21 Records out of 22207 Records

Factors influencing the business viability of local apparel trade within a liberalised market : a case of Nairobi, Kenya

Author: Elung'ata, Beatrice

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2003

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Trade development ; Clothing industry ; Liberalization ; Nairobi, Kenya ;

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to find out the factors influencing the business viability of local apparel trade within a liberalized market in Nairobi, and to investigate how consumer preferences and buying practices have affected apparel trade. Data were collected using interview schedules and observation checklist. A random sample of 90 apparel traders was drawn from three market centres in Nairobi (Kenyatta market, Jericho market and the Central business district) for interview according to the types of apparel they sold. These types were new imported; second-hand; locally manufactured and custom-tailored apparel. Data were analyzed by use of frequencies, percentages and Chi-square tests using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (SPSS?). Results from the study showed that 57% of the apparel traders were female. Majority, (80%) were under the age of 40 years. All traders had received some level of formal education. Most (71%) apparel traders had 1-5 employees, an indication, an indication of small-sized businesses. More than half (64%) of the respondents owned their businesses. Notably, 57% had up to 5 years experience in selling apparel. The main types of apparel sold were New Imported (37%) and Custom-tailored (32%). Majority (89%) of the traders targeted women as their main clientele because they were considered the most willing buyers. In addition, they also stocked apparel for men and/or children in order to make more profit for their businesses. Lack of customers, stiff competition and lack of government support were reported as major problems facing over 50% of the traders. For most traders, providing high quality merchandise was the main strategy used to solve their problems. Government support by way of providing loans and making prices (license fees, taxes, custom charges) affordable were suggested as ways of creating a level trading ground for all traders. This would also increase the traders' business performance and viability. From the study, 40% of the respondents made up to Ksh.40, 000 per month during times of high sales. Chi-square analysis showed that the traders' age, position held in business and source of fabric/clothing significantly influenced the types of apparel sold by traders. Therefore, apparel traders could enhance these key factors to increase competitive edge in the market. From the analysis, it was evident that the type of apparel sold by traders was affected by consumer preferences for imported apparel because locally produced apparel did not meet consumers' needs in terms of quality and variety. The Ministry of Trade and Industry should formulate mechanisms that will enable apparel traders access information easily on existing trends and policies as they affect their businesses. Apparel producers and traders could use this information to improve the quality of local items. Lack of a level trading ground for all traders remained as the main deterrent to their success.

Analysis of the performance of the garment industry in Nairobi and its contribution to export trade after trade liberalization.

Author: Nyaga, Zipporah

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Lower Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Exports ; Clothing industry ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Trade liberalisation and entrepreneurship : responses to constraints and opportunities by micro and small garment producers in Nairobi.

Author: Muguku, Charles Wambugu

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Trade liberalization ; Entrepreneurs ; Small business ; Clothing industry ; Nairobi, Kenya ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

An analysis of sub-Saharan Africa's textile and apparel industries

Author: McRee, Aaron Nathanael

Awarding University: North Carolina State University, USA

Level : MS

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Textile industry ; Clothing industry ;

Abstract:

A study was undertaken to determine the competitive nature of the sub-Saharan African countries specifically: South Africa, Mauritius, Kenya, Lesotho, and Madagascar. These countries' textile and apparel industries were examined with michael porter's competitive advantage of nations theory model (1990) to assess the level of competitiveness. Using the porter model along with an index adapted from Hunger and Wheelen's Industry Matrix (2001), it was determined that South Africa and Mauritius possess a certain level of competitiveness in their respective textile and apparel industries. To date, Kenya, Lesotho, and Madagascar have little or no competitiveness in their textile and apparel industries.

Capacity in micro and small enterprise : the case of small garment enterprises in the Nairobi City Council.

Author: Randiki, Mary

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Lower Kabete Library ;

Subject Terms: Small business/Clothing industry/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The influence of consumer ethnocentric tendency on the attitude towards locally manufactured and imported clothes.

Author: Kong'ong'o, T O

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ; University of Nairobi Medical Library ;

Subject Terms: Consumer attitudes/Clothing industry/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

A study of the training needs of quality control and production managers in clothing industries in Nairobi.

Author: Oigo, E Bosibori

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MEd

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Clothing industry ; Management ; Quality control ; Production management ; Nairobi, Kenya ;

Abstract:

This study investigated the competencies and training needs of quality and production managers in large and medium size garment manufacturing firms in Nairobi. It also sought to know the relationship between the firm characteristics and problems they faced, and the relationship between the competencies and training needs of training managers. This information showed issues affecting the industry and proposed ways of dealing with them to improve the quality of clothing manufactured in Kenya. A survey of 35 garment manufacturers was done between June 1996 and April 1997, and in-depth interviews carried out with their quality and production managers. The data collected was analysed then summarized using frequencies and percentages. Most of the firms were large and produced uniforms or undergarments for sale in the local market only. The study found that those making other types of clothing were more likely to experience problems arising from the liberalization of the economy, although all the firms had problems with quality. All of the managers interviewed (13) said they combined the roles of Quality Control Manager and Production Manager but most of their duties involved production management rather than quality control. Fifty-four percent (seven) of the managers had worked for more than ten years in their present jobs and had formal training in subjects related to their jobs. Approximately half of them (46%) felt they did not need further training in managerial skills. All four managers with on-the-job training as opposed to formal training expressed a need for training in technical skills. On the basis of the findings, recommendations were made to the manufacturers to reduce the workload of their managers and take a more active role in purchasing high quality inputs. Technical institutes should develop their quality control courses so that they can conveniently be offered to the busy managers in clothing industries. The government needs to enforce legislation and institute policies to protect the clothing industry from unfair trade practices. This will enable it to revive and develop to its full potential, to cope with competition in a liberalized economy.

Formal credit financing for small scale enterprises in Kenya : a case study of NGOs and small scale women entrepreneurs in the garment manufacturing sector of the textile industry in Nairobi and Nyeri from 1955 to 1996.

Author: Wanjiru, Macharia Lilian

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 1998

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Small business/Loans/Women owned businesses/Entrepreneurs/Clothing industry/Nongovernmental organizations/Nairobi, Kenya/Nyeri, Kenya/ ;

Abstract:

The small-scale enterprises contribution to the growth of the national economy continues to assume increasing importance especially in job-creation and mobilisation of savings. The sector is encumbered by many problems chief among them being financing. Various organisations have stepped in to try and alleviate this problem. It is in this light that this study was carried out to try and throw some light on factors that inhibit credit availability to women in the small-scale enterprises. Specifically, this research sought to analyse how education, marital status family size, income and starting up capital affect credit availability among the small-scale women entrepreneurs on the garment manufacturing industry. The study established that education, income and family size are positively related to credit availability. Marital status was found to negatively affect credit availability though the relationship is very small. It also had a bearing on the likelihood of the entrepreneur to use credit. Start-up capital had a small but positive effect on credit availability. Other findings include the fact that most irregular cash flows coupled with lack of awareness of existing credit schemes were major inhibitors of credit availability to the entrepreneurs. Other factors cited though in relatively few cases include high interest rates, high minimum deposit requirements and lengthy loan procedures. In the light of the research findings, it was suggested that the entrepreneurs be given business counseling and training where they are found to lack sufficient skills e.g. to cope with sales fluctuations and other business problems. The business counseling and training could be offered as part of the pre-loan education programmes or separately at a small fee. It was also suggested that the micro-financing institutions intensify their publicity campaign to increase the awareness of their programmes and their benefits to the entrepreneurs, especially to the newcomers in the small scale enterprises sector.

Conduct and performance of the marketing system for small-scale garment making firms in Kenya : a case study of Kariobangi and Kenyatta Markets in Nairobi.

Author: Munyi, Mary Wairimu

Awarding University: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 1998

Holding Libraries: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Library ;

Subject Terms: Kariobangi, Nairobi, Kenya ; Kenyatta Market, Nairobi, Kenya ; Clothing industry ; Small business ; Marketing ;

Abstract:

This study explored the conduct and performance of the small-scale garment making firms in marketing their products. The study was prompted by the fact that there are many participants in the garment sub-sector i.e. the second hand clothes dealers, the new clothes importers and the large-scale manufacturers. The research sought to explore how the small-scale garment making firms survive in marketing their products in this competitive environment. The study covered promotion and pricing strategies being used by the firms and the distribution channels used in marketing their products. The study also covered the marketing margins and information collusion among the garment makers. A sample of 47 garment-making enterprises was taken, where 24 were taken from Kenyatta Market and 23 from Kariobangi Market in Nairobi city. A simple random sampling technique was then applied in getting the required sample. Primary data was collected by use of a semi-structured questionnaire. Secondary data was obtained from published material on marketing available in libraries. Data was analysed by use of percentages, frequencies and averages. Data was presented in tables and bar graphs. Key finding indicated that the garment makers do not collude with one another when pricing their goods. The garment makers use mark-up pricing strategy while still applying meet the competition pricing and discriminative pricing method. The findings also indicate that the garment makers relied much on displays on promotion of their goods. Zero level distribution channel was the most preferred channel of distribution. The study recommended that the government offer training to garment makers on marketing aimed at developing and assisting them in venturing into new markets.

The role of used cloth sub-sector and its effect on new cloth sub-sector in Eldoret.

Author: Njoroge, Samson

Awarding University: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 1994

Holding Libraries: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Library ;

Subject Terms: Clothing industry ; Used goods ; Business conditions ; Eldoret, Kenya ;

Abstract:

The role and effect of the used cloth sub sector on the new cloth sub-sector in Eldoret was examined. One hundred and fifty used cloth (business) and forty new cloth business were studied. This study established that the used cloth sub-sector in Eldoret is not in formal as normally considered but rather 'Semi-formal' in that though they bare no licenses the Municipal Council charges them a fee on a daily basis. The used cloth sub-sector by its nature has a great contribution to the people of Eldoret town in terms of job creation, income generation as well as encouraging social change - it requires only a small amount of capital to venture here, and hence create numerous indirect jobs to the low income groups of the population. The two sub-sectors (used and new clothes) have distinctive customers and hence different clients. The major competi tion for the new clothes compose of new and cheaper imported clothes and clothing materials. The greatest problem experienced by the used cloth sub sector business is in form of a constant harassment and criminalisation of this form of business. Lack of property designed and tailored credi t programme coupled with lack of knowledge of the availability or otherwise of credit was found to be another problem. Lack of knowledge as to contributions made by the informal sector in general has often led to bias towards the formal sector in disregard to the formal sector.Majority of the people who operate informal businesses and used cloth business in particular were found to be people who have attained '0' level education and out of unemployment decided to venture into their own businesses. Due to ease -ot entry and the small amount of knowledge and experience needed here, the used cloth sub-sector presents a great potential for creating employment opportunities for many people.