26 Records out of 22207 Records

A critical analysis of the agreement on agriculture in relation to developing countries-is market acess viable?

Author: Aluda, Jemimah Terresiah Collins

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : LLM

Year: 2011

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Agribusiness ; Trade agreements ; Agricultural policy ; Developing countries ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Factors influencing the sustainability of self help group projects in Taita District

Author: Kiamba, Harrison Mutisya

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2010

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Taita Taveta District/Sustainable development/Rural development/Groups/Project management/Agriculture Sector Programme Support (Kenya)/Agricultural policy ;

Abstract:

Group approach to development is seen by development partners both public and private as the most cost- effective way of addressing community needs when compared with the individual approach. Interventions managed by self help groups operate profitably when external assistance is flowing. However, after the cessation of external support, most of these projects either collapse or continue to operate below capacity. Most development partners are raising concerns over the sustainability of self help group projects. This study sought to identify the factors influencing sustainability of self help group projects in Taita Taveta district. The focus was on self help groups supported through the Agricultural Sector Programme Support (ASPS). The research design was a descriptive survey involving 30 self help groups and 20 frontline extension workers. Both secondary and primary data were collected. The collected data were tabulated and then analyzed using the 'list and tally' method. After all the responses were tallied, frequency and percentage distribution tables were prepared. The key recommendations of the study were the training of private service providers (PSPs) to supplement services offered by the few existing public and private service providers. Similarly, the approval of National Agricultural Sector Extension Policy -Implementation Framework (NASEP- IF) and the Agricultural Sector Development Strategy (ASDS) policy documents will bolster provision of advisory services as they recognize the role played by the private sector in agricultural development. Social loafing was ranked highly as a factor influencing sustainability of self help group projects. This study recommends further research on the concept of social loafing, to determine its causes, effects and how selfhelp groups can deal with it.

An investigation into the factors inhibiting entrepreneurial behaviour among the subsistence maize farmers : a case of Siaya District

Author: Nyamgero, Wilfred Albert

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : MSc

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Farmers ; Rural development ; Agricultural policy ; Siaya District ;

Abstract:

80% of the Kenyan Population live in the rural areas and are involved in agriculture on a subsistence basis. This represents a lack of enterprise culture that accounts for the poverty in the rural areas. In order to eradicate poverty in the rural areas the subsistence farmers need be made to adopt an enterprise culture by practicing their main economic activity as a business enterprise. GOK,(2005) To attain this the factors that account for the lack of entrepreneurial behaviour among the farmers must be identified and alleviated. The Government and other stakeholders have carried out a lot of studies and put in much effort towards inculcating of entrepreneurial behaviour among the farmers but this has so far not born fruit as in the case of Siaya District where to-date 80% of the farmers are hooked to maize growing on a subsistence basis. GOK,(2001) This Research investigated the factors that inhibit entrepreneurial Behaviour among the maize farmers. It involved an Interview of The Stakeholders in Agriculture In Siaya District among them the farmers, the Ministry of Agriculture Officers, The Provincial Administration, The Civic Leaders, The Staff of NGOs and CBOs, and Research Bodies. A Questionnaire and an Interview Guide were used to collect data. Sampling was done through multi-stage sampling process. It found out that the main reason inhibiting Entrepreneurial Behaviour among them was lack of finance to buy farm inputs as a result of the high poverty levels in the district. The intervention strategies were inadequate and not comprehensive and that made them ineffective. To make Intervention Strategies effective it recommends that they be made more responsive to the farmers' problems, be designed in collaboration with the farmers and be made comprehensive. It recommends further research on better utilization of resources in the rural areas to improve on incomes of the farmers.

The impact of differential gender access to resources on agricultural production : the case of Nandi district, 1954-2000

Author: Tanui, Prisca Jerono

Awarding University: Kenyatta University, Kenya

Level : PhD

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: Kenyatta University Moi Library ;

Subject Terms: Gender/Land tenure/Agricultural policy/Nandi (African people)/Nandi District/Agricultural production/Colonialism/Women ;

Abstract:

The study examines the impact of differential gender access to agricultural resources on production in Nandi from 1954 to 2000. It begins with at attempt to trace gender access to agricultural resources in pre-colonial Nandi from the nineteenth century to 1953. The aim is to determine the changes in gender access to agricultural resources before the period of study. Feminist political economy is applied to analyze the changes in gender access to agricultural resources in Nandi economy. Feminist political economy analyses how the complex interaction between economic, social and ideological aspects has influenced gender relations of production in Nandi. Using the paradigm it is possible to demonstrate how change in institutional arrangement in the society constrained prospects of equality in gender relations. In response, gender politics come to focus on social roles in which women as agents of change aspired to initiate improvement of their status. The study makes the assumption that the measures which were undertaken by the colonial authorities to reform agriculture contributed to the decline of agricultural production in Nandi. Moreover, these reforms adversely affected gender relation of production in the region. The study is an outcome of the use of oral data collected in the field, archival material in Kenya National Archives and secondary data mostly books and journals on the subject from various libraries. The main findings were that political, social and ideological factors interacted in a complex manner and over time influenced gender access to land, control over labour and produce, extension services, technology and credit. Gender relations are essentially perceived as a notion of inequitable power relations. In the Nandi society, women had less power than men. Consequently, they were unable to control most of the agricultural resources. The strict control over women's access to resources in Nandi was frustrating to some women. Alternatives did exist for strong-minded women who sought to evade the strict control over access to resources. Some of this activities included running away from their marriage to urban centers, engaging in woman to woman marriage, and also engaging in income generating activities without informing their husbands.

State and agriculture in Kenya : the case of sugar industry.

Author: Mboya, Tom

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2004

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Crops ; Sugar industry ; Agricultural policy ; Food processing industry ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

The implementation and institutionalisation of agroforestry in western Kenya : a gender and agency analysis.

Author: Hambly, Helen Victoria

Awarding University: York University, Canada

Level : PhD

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: World Agroforestry Centre Library ; University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Agroforestry/Agricultural extension work/Agricultural policy/Siaya District/ ;

Abstract:

This study analyses agroforestry project implementation and efforts to institutionalise new and improved agroforestry technologies at the local level. It concentrates on the case of the care Agroforestry Extension Project (AEP) in Siaya District, in western Kenya, which is one of the oldest and largest agroforestry projects in sub-Saharan Africa. Farmers in western Kenya have used trees for centuries. In the early 1980s, fears of an impending 'woodfuel crisis' in the region catalysed the set-up of agroforestry research and development projects to promote technologies such as tree nurseries, alley-cropping, multipurpose woodlots and 'green' fencing with trees. Women's groups have been the primary means through which agroforestry projects have been implemented in western Kenya. The theoretical framework of this dissertation combines insights from policy and project implementation, gender relations and institutional and organisational studies. Its research methodology involved in-depth interviews with 96 male and female farmers and 33 women's groups in Siaya District, as well as discussions with representatives of government and Non-Governmental Organisations. Quantitative data provided baseline information about the farmers, women's groups and agroforestry adoption. Qualitative data was analysed with Nudist (Non-numerical Data Indexing, Search and Theorizing) software to explore farmer perceptions, organisational relationships and project processes. The analysis covers 12 years of the implementation of the AEP, investigating its content and context between 1983 and 1995. The author argues that the project failed to recognise farmers as social agents who act both in appreciation of, as well as in opposition to, the structures of a project that seeks to institutionalise agroforestry. Institutional analysis in agroforestry can be improved by investigating policy and project implementation. However, gender relations influence farmers' agency and should be incorporated into implementation analysis. This study concludes that efforts to institutionalise agroforestry at the local level failed to take into account the extent to which agroforestry was already being practised by farmers, the abandonment of some agroforestry technologies and the collapse of women's groups. On these fronts, in fact, there was de- institutionalisation as a result of project implementation.

Effects of agricultural policies in Kenya : an analytical framework and application in the maize market.

Author: Sasaki, Noriaki

Awarding University: University of Arizona, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2000

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Agricultural economics/Agricultural policy/Maize/ ;

Abstract:

This dissertation reviews the process of maize market liberalization in Kenya, investigates a relationship between market integration and price stability, and presents a theoretical foundation for numerical simulations to evaluate effects of agricultural policies. The computer simulations are used to analyze the market under uncertainty. The model examines welfare effects and response to the policies as well as changes in means and coefficients of variation of maize prices and expected income of farmers. The model solves simultaneously indirect utility maximization of individual farmers and a spatial price equilibrium model to give a rational expectations equilibrium land allocation. It takes account of inseparability of consumption and production, stochastic prices and returns, and effects of size and location of farmers. Maize price is endogenously determined as farmers choose a crop mix between maize and a cash crop. It offers a framework in which various agricultural policies, characteristics of farmers, and conditions of markets can be analyzed.

Tobacco under contract : agricultural development and environmental change in Kuria District, western Kenya.

Author: Otieno, Joseph Oluoch

Awarding University: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1998

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Tobacco ; Farming ; Agricultural policy ; Ecology ; Environmental impact ; Kuria (African people) ; Kuria District ;

Abstract:

This dissertation takes a political ecological approach to examine the environmental impact of contract tobacco cultivation in Kuria District, south west Kenya. It focuses in particular on the social and ecological processes that have influenced landuse practices at the farm level from the colonial period to the present. The decision making of Kuria farmers is shown to be influenced by processes located at levels ranging from the local to the international. A variety of methods are employed to assess the nature and direction of environmental change. However, given the paucity of reliable longitudinal data, this study privileges the perceptions of Kuria farmers on the evolution of soil quality, crop yields, water levels, and vegetation change. A major finding of this study is that, contrary to expectations, the Kuria landscape has become more wooded over the past twenty to thirty years. It was hypothesized that the heightened demand for fuel wood to cure tobacco would result in reduced tree cover. However, the combination of contractual requirements and farmers' personal initiatives has led to considerable tree planting, especially of eucalyptus. A second major finding of this study is that farmers perceive this expansion of trees in negative terms. Farmers cited reduced crop yields and lower stream levels as two adverse impacts of eucalyptus. Many policy makers, on the other hand, assume that increased tree cover, irrespective of species, results in an enhanced environment. In conclusion, this dissertation stresses the importance of placing the landuser at the center of agricultural and environmental policy discussions, especially if the twin goals of increasing agricultural productivity and environmental conservation are to be realized in sustainable manner.

Effects of Structural Adjustment Programme on Kenya's maize sector.

Author: Mwakio, Gloria Hope Maghuwa

Awarding University: University of Guelph, Canada

Level : MSc

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Agricultural economics ; Agricultural policy ; Maize ; Structural adjustment ;

Abstract:

This study is an investigation of the impact of structural adjustment programme on the maize sector in Kenya. The policies analyzed in this study are price and exchange rate policies. In Kenya, uncertainties and conflicting perceptions prevail in the minds of the people and within the relevant ministries and at the highest levels of government concerning the effects of these policies on various socioeconomic groups and government objectives, especially food security. This study offers an insight into the consequences of the policies on maize producers', consumers', taxpayers' and economic welfare. An aggregate commodity model of demand and supply equations was employed. A simulation analysis was performed under different scenarios to measure the impact of: first, price deregulation; secondly, devaluation of the Kenyan shilling; and thirdly, a combination of price increase and devaluation. The results show that maize producers gain and consumers lose in terms of producer and consumer surplus, and taxpayers gain. There is a net welfare gain as a result of SAP.

The politics of agriculture in East Africa : policy challenges for a sustainable future (Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania).

Author: Kyatha, Ruth Mutindi

Awarding University: Acadia University, Canada

Level : MA

Year: 1994

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Political economy/Agricultural policy/Colonialism/East Africa/ ;

Abstract:

Agribusiness or cash crop production was introduced to East Africa--i.e. Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania--along with European political and socio-cultural systems, by colonialism. East African traditions and customs had ensured relative stability and peace among the various ethnic societies that were lost when the Europeans invaded the region. Agribusiness took up the best land and people lost the ability to feed themselves, a problem that exists to date. As they became marginalized, people devised their own survival strategies which merely helped them live within the imposed structures. The problem of hunger grew through the colonial era to become a crisis in the post-colonial period. Attempts to alleviate the suffering worsened the situation, mainly because these solutions always came 'from above.' For any solutions to work, they must take into account the diversity of East African societies. This thesis examines available literature on East Africa, and Africa in general, to establish neorealistic pluralism as the most appropriate approach to the problems in East Africa. A plan of action, to be implemented as a pilot project, is proposed to start the process of recovery by re-introducing traditional crops and farming practices throughout East Africa.