22 Records out of 22207 Records

Application of cross cultural management orientation at the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program

Author: Wagude, Phelisia Akoth

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Acculturation/Management training/Orientations/Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program/Scholarships and fellowships ;

Abstract:

The study sought to establish the application of cross cultural management orientation at Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program (IFP).Specifically, the study sought to address two main issues: To establish how the cross cultural management orientation is applied at the Ford Foundation IFP and the challenges faced in the process of its application. A qualitative case study approach was adopted. Theories of cross cultural management are based on findings of: Geert Hofstede national culture, Gesteland's, Cross cultural dimensions patterns for cross - cultural business behavior and Annette Sinclair's key areas that managers must pay attention to when leading multi-cultural teams. In-depth interviews consisted of seven Senior Ford Foundation IFP staff and analysis was by use of content analysis technique. The study established that Ford Foundation IFP managers apply cross cultural management orientation throughout the implementation processes. Research question one, answers how Ford Foundation IFP applies cross cultural management orientation through: Operations in a cross-cultural environment, networking and relationships, Sensitivity to cross-cultural issues, Approaches of cross-cultural management at country levels, Performance management across cultures and Communication across cultures. The key challenges are discussed in four sub-sections: Communication, time, differences in opinion and deciding on work approach, to address question two. The study recommends that Ford Foundation should be more explicit in documenting the strategies for Cross cultural management orientation, do further research for the remaining Global Partners and whole life cycle stages of the program.

Factors influencing expatriate cultural adaption at Aga Khan University Hospital, Kenya

Author: Muriuki, Stephen Kathurima

Awarding University: University of Nairobi, Kenya

Level : MBA

Year: 2012

Holding Libraries: University of Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library ;

Subject Terms: Expatriates ; Acculturation ; Adaptation ; Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya ; Hospitals ;

Abstract:

The increasing globalization of the world requires new measurements for businesses if they are to succeed in the international market. Cultural gaps have a great effect on the difference between living and working in one's home country and abroad. The study was based on human capital theory, which states that international migration depends on standard components of individual capital as age, gender, education, skill, experience, marital status, as well as on personality features (ambition to succeed, entrepreneurial spirit, or a willingness to take risks by changing language, culture, and social environment). Expatriates working in Kenya tend to be either highly paid managers of multinational companies, or development and NGO employees and volunteers. Health care industry in Kenya and more specific at Aga Khan University Hospital continues to receive expatriates to compliment local expertise on highly specialized clinical or medical areas. The research objective of this study was to determine factors influencing expatriate cultural adaptation at Aga khan University Hospital in Kenya. The research design employed in this study was descriptive survey design. Data was collected from the expatriate Executives, Managers and Supervisors expatriates in Aga Khan University using questionnaires. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics whereby frequencies, percentages, mean and standard deviations, generated from the various data categories were computed and presented in graphs and tables. The study established that the most significant aspects of cultural training were that expatriates are satisfied with the cultural training provided by the organization, expatriates are satisfied with participation in many local community events and that expatriates are satisfied with the duties of the job during the assignment. The study established that majority of the respondents stayed with their spouse / partner during the assignment. This depicts that the majority of the expatriates valued their families and thus opted to stay with their spouses / partners during the assignment to enhance the cultural adaptation. The study established that reward and compensation affect expatriate adaptation to a great extent. The study recommends review of the existing policies and laws on reward and compensation of the expatriates with a view to ensure that they meet the prevailing international markets rates to retain the expatriates in the organization. The study also recommends that the organization should offer a high quality cultural training to the expatriates coupled with efforts to integration with the local community to maximize their cultural adaptation in Kenya.

Acculturation, coping styles, and mental health of first generation Kenyan immigrants in the United States.

Author: Odera, Lilian A

Awarding University: University of Michigan, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2007

Holding Libraries: Dissertation Abstracts International ;

Subject Terms: Psychology ; Acculturation ; Mental health ; Immigration ;

Abstract:

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among acculturation, acculturative stress, transnationalism, and coping styles among first generation Kenyan immigrants in the United States. This study also investigated the effects of these variables on health outcomes in this immigrant sample. A web-based survey was administered to 209 Kenyans residing in the United States. Questionnaire items assessed levels of American, Kenyan, and Bicultural acculturation, acculturative stress, social support, religious coping, transnational contacts/ties, and demographic factors. Health outcome items assessed depressive and somatic symptoms, and subjective health ratings. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to determine the relationships among study variables. Independent sample t-tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to examine group differences in study variables. Results indicated that higher utilization of religious coping strategies were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms. Female participants also reported higher levels of depressive symptoms and subjective health compared to males. Results also revealed that higher levels of acculturative stress were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms and poor subjective health ratings. With respect to acculturation, results revealed that younger age was associated with American acculturation, while older age was associated with Kenyan acculturation. Findings also indicated that male participants reported higher levels of American, Kenyan, and Bicultural acculturation compared to females. Transnational contact was positively associated with Kenyan and Bicultural acculturation. With regard to coping styles, results revealed that religious coping was associated with older age, shorter length of stay in the U.S., female gender, and transnational ties. These findings suggest that choice of coping styles and acculturation of Kenyan immigrants in the U.S. are affected by demographic factors and transnational ties. In addition, findings suggest that health outcomes are influenced by coping styles, acculturative stress, and demographic factors. These findings contribute to the understanding of the acculturation experience of Kenyan immigrants in the U.S. and indicate the need for further study of adjustment processes in this population. Clinically, these findings may be utilized in the development of culturally-sensitive mental health interventions for Kenyan immigrants in the U.S.

Domestic violence : a consequence of acculturation among Kamba couples

Author: Ndunda, Coretta N

Awarding University: Daystar University, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 2005

Holding Libraries: Daystar University Library ; University of Nairobi Medical Library ;

Subject Terms: Domestic violence ; Kamba (African people) ; Couples ; Acculturation ;

Abstract:

This study holds the view that acculturation is a factor that has contributed to the increase in domestic violence among the Kamba family. The Kamba family has gone through cultural changes especially in communication, arising from the adaptation of foreign cultural values, before, during, and after colonization. These changes were examined from the dimensions of education. The study argued that, while there was little evidence of domestic violence in the traditional Kamba family, the modern Kamba family is a product of the acculturation process. This domestication of foreign cultural values has led to changes in the stock of knowledge, which the husband and wife draw from while communicating. Mead (1955) defines interaction as the conversation of gestures in that during interaction people signal their respective causes of action, consciously or unconsciously, thereby, emitting gestures, while at the same time interpreting the gestures of others. This is a simultaneous process of signaling and interpreting. If there is any communication breakdown (of gestures), the actors revert to frustration, hence, violence. Within all other forms of social set-up, the family is a social institution where intensive interaction takes place and within which communication breakdown can result in serious consequences. In view of the stated research problem and purpose, the research questions were stated and objectives established as a guide for the research. Specifically, the study sought answers to the questions of the prevalent, types and characteristics of domestic violence within the Kamba family, and the extent to which the pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial changes have influenced the traditional Kamba cultural values that previously served as social sanctions against domestic violence. The literature review was undertaken and the relevant theories examined culminating in the operationalisation of spousal violence and the purposive sampling in identifying and selecting the study units. Data collected for analysis was both secondary and primary. Secondary data was collected from records, reports, publications and other internal documents obtained from six organizations currently dealing with issues of gender| domestic violence. Secondary data was also obtained from government?s statistics, and specifically the Demographic Health Survey 2003. Primary data was obtained from key information and interviews conducted with 12 senior officials of organizations dealing with domestic violence based in Nairobi and also with 8 Kamba elders drawn from the Kamba community. The data obtained was mainly qualitative and was analyzed through the use of content analysis methodologies, specifically, case analysis of secondary data to elicit information relevant to the research questions. The results of the data analysis indicated that there was evidence of domestic violence occurring in the Kamba family. The types of domestic violence reported were physical, sexual, and psychological characterized by battering, burning, and sexual assaults among others. The perpetrators of violence were both the husband and wife, though wife battering was more common. Further, spousal violence was reported as being common among the urban Kamba families of Police Constables, Prison Warden, Primary School Teachers, and Military men. The main causes or reasons for violence were unfaithfulness, misunderstanding, frequent quarrels, drunkard ness, and failure to get the preferred child. These factors relate to issues of communication and particular cultural communications. The study concluded that changes in cultural values, norms, beliefs and attitude arising from the sustained domestication of Western cultural values in place of the traditional Kamba cultural values might explain the rising cases of spousal violence. The study recommends a sustained enculturation or incorporation of Kamba value systems, the identification and re adoption of previous traditional value

Discovering the face of an intercultural God : Christian evangelization among the Turkana nomads of Kenya and implications for the worldwide church.

Author: Grenham, Thomas Gerard

Awarding University: Boston College, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 2002

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Turkana (African people) ; Acculturation ; Ethnology ; Christianity ; Evangelism ;

Abstract:

This dissertation defines interculturation as the activity of persons from diverse cultures and religious worldviews mutually and respectfully interacting with the intention of discovering the vision of the Gospel. Seeds of Gospel vision exist in every person, culture, and religion. Religious intercultural engagement uncovers the spirituality of the gospel which can lead to both a local and global commitment for the well-being of every person, culture, and religious perspective. The process of interculturation perceives cultural and religious interdependency as crucial for life-giving relationships within all creation. Worldwide collaboration is necessary to sustain human dignity and life for all. Within an age of globalization that fosters economic interdependency among nation-states, diverse cultures and religious perspectives encounter different challenges and opportunities for understanding religious and cultural identity, faith, human freedom, transcendence, justice, peace, reconciliation, relationships, and so forth. All religious evangelization, particularly Christian evangelization, needs further exploration in order to foster a diverse spiritual solidarity within this interconnected and interdependent world. Religious education functions in nurturing the life-giving seeds of the Gospel into plants of spiritual nourishment that reflect scented flowers of life-giving interpretation, appropriation, and transformation for sustained hope. Agents of Christian evangelization have the task of actualizing Gospel vision through relevant religious practices, localizing this vision within the contextuality of lived human experience, and globalizing this sense of transcendence for human well-being worldwide. For diverse communities of faith, meaning and a sense of belonging are discerned when each engages the other in an evolution of conversation. Such life-giving conversation is underpinned by a respectful reciprocity that shares power to create a conducive environment for mutual trust. This environment shapes and nurtures 'right relationship' with ourselves, others, creation, and God.

The development implications of American evangelicalism in Kenya.

Author: Hearn, Julie Franoise VWK

Awarding University: University of Leeds, England

Level : PhD

Year: 1997

Holding Libraries: Institute of Commonwealth Studies Library ;

Subject Terms: Evangelism/Acculturation/Missionaries ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Brer rabbit is dying : the demise of traditional morality among the Kikuyu people of Kenya and an effort to reclaim it.

Author: Huston, Dewey O

Awarding University: Asbury Theological Seminary, USA

Level : DMiss

Year: 1996

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Kikuyu (African people)/Ethnology/Christianity/Morality/Acculturation/Social life and customs/ ;

Abstract:

Kikuyu traditional enculturation, as demonstrated by the oral literature, contained moral ideals consistent with the universal moral values Jesus taught in the sermon on the mount. These Kikuyu moral ideals are distinct proof that God created all humans in God's own image and has written universal moral law on their hearts (Romans 2:15). Prior to the intrusion of Western ideology, the Kikuyu community emphasized character first and skills second. Intrusion by forces of Western colonialism and missions changed the culture of the Kikuyu, but none was greater than the power of schools. Western education, as introduced by Christian missions, gave prominence to knowledge and materialistic values, thus replacing traditional enculturation with Western ideals. Modern Kikuyu youth strive to emulate the Western lifestyle, hoping to gain all the benefits of Western education and technology. Consequently, Kikuyu youth of the twentieth century have lost respect for their African heritage, suffer a generational gap, and have developed a sense of inferiority and discontinuity with their tradition, resulting in a state of anomie. Kikuyu christian leaders can resolve this moral crisis by believing again in their cultural heritage, declaring the exigency of traditional Kikuyu moral values, and combining the best of the past with modern Western culture.

Television and the shaping of culture in Kenya : a case study of Nairobi high school youths' use of foreign TV programming.

Author: Gathu, Faith Wariara

Awarding University: Bowling Green State University, USA

Level : PhD

Year: 1995

Holding Libraries: University Microfilms International ;

Subject Terms: Television programs ; Secondary school students ; Social conditions and trends ; Acculturation ; Nairobi ;

Abstract:

This study examined the social uses of media technologies, particularly foreign television programs, in the lives of Kenya's urban youth. It provided baseline information about the types of media technologies available to the youth and the manner in which they interacted with both the hardware and the software to construct new cultural meanings. Data were collected by administering an audience survey among 320 high school students in Nairobi, conducting focus group interviews among 50 of those surveyed, and performing in depth interviews with youth counselors. The survey dealt with access, exposure, preferences, viewing experiences, and opinions about foreign programs while the interviews investigated how cultural meanings were constructed. The study was primarily conducted using the media cultural studies approach which engages social issues in the decoding of media texts by way of reception analysis. From the data it was concluded that the television viewing experience was a complex activity in which meanings were constructed at an integrated magical, mythical, and mental-rational level. Foreign TV programs were reported to be more popular than local programs yet most were often viewed with a sense of embarrassment, especially in the presence of parents and younger siblings. Appropriation of the televisual products was demonstrated to contribute to the formation of new class-based cultural communities (the culture of obohoness) in which creative imitation of African American speaking and dressing styles and Caribbean reggae musicians' life styles were characteristic features of these co-cultures. In addition use of foreign TV programs as socializing agents was shown to contribute to conflictual relationships between the youths and their parents and elders. The tension between traditional values and modernity via media products provided a means to question the legitimacy of such traditions as long funeral ceremonies. The tension also contributed to a growing sense of individualism and to an uneasy acceptance of material goods and to the emergence of a stance against patriarchy and paternalistic attitudes. This study further found that textual meanings were interpreted in culturally relevant ways, therefore problematizing what has previously been simplistically labeled as cultural imperialism.

Inculturation of adult baptistimal ritual among the Agikuyu : a comparative study based on the Agikuyu of Murang'a Diocese.

Author: Wainaina, Francis

Awarding University: Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1994

Holding Libraries: Catholic University of Eastern Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Baptism/Kikuyu (African people)/Murang'a, Kenya/Acculturation/Social life and customs/Rites and ceremonies/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE

Inculturation of adult baptismal ritual among the Agikuyu : a comparative study based on the Agikuyu of Murang'a Diocese.

Author: Wainana, Francis

Awarding University: Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Kenya

Level : MA

Year: 1994

Holding Libraries: Catholic University of Eastern Africa Library ;

Subject Terms: Baptism/Kikuyu (African people)/Murang'a, Kenya/Acculturation/Social life and customs/Rites and ceremonies/ ;

Abstract:

ABSTRACT NOT AVAILABLE